(half)Rockered skis: Bogus?

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  1. #1

    (half)Rockered skis: Bogus?

    It was demo day today at Belleayre, so I skied those most of the day.

    I wanted to try this half-rockered construction - it isn't really full rockered like for powder skis.

    I think the skis I demoed were Elan Waveflex xTi Fusion.

    They didn't really wow me. I like slalom race skis, and the radius was right, but they skied too easily. Didn't feel like I was "on rails", but instead felt like I was "on rail".

    My conclusion about this "Rockered" thing: it is pretty bogus. Unless you have not learned to carve yet. I imagine a non-carver could carve pretty quickly with those. They feel like beginner skis, but can still be skied hard.

    They skied well in bumps, because the outside edge would not get in the way, ever.

    I said to the Elan rep after I skied them, "If I just detuned about 4 inches of my outside edge, I would effectively have a rockered ski." He agreed.



    O, and the newer Atomic Nomads can't hold a candle to the older Metrons. Too damp to be much fun. Is everybody dumbing down their skis just to be able to call them "all mountain"?

    Top skis of the day for me were Elan SLX slalom racers.

  2. #2
    There is no comparing a race SL ski to a rockered all mountain ski. They are designed for totally different users. I have a race ski that carves amazing turns, but sucks trying to throw them through trees or natural terrain. My Blizzard Bushwacker can carve decently, but is so much fun in the trees, or the sides of trails.

    And you are correct the Nomad, cant be skied like the old Metrons. Different style of ski. If you want a great carver from Atomic get on the D2 series, not the Nomads. The Nomad is a very fun all around ski.
    104(12/13)
    105
    (13/14)
    48(14/15)
    35(15/16)
    Rossi Soul 7 w/ Marker F12 (188 )
    Blizzard Brahma Limited Edition (180)
    Atomic Redster XT(175)

  3. #3
    The main benefit would be for soft, natural snow. There is an unbeleivable benefit to a rockered ski with little to no camber for me anyway in soft natural snow. I still keep a traditional cambered pair for firm conditions but I can assure that fat rockered skis have changed a whole lot for me and many others.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by thinnmann View Post
    It was demo day today at Belleayre, so I skied those most of the day.

    I wanted to try this half-rockered construction - it isn't really full rockered like for powder skis.

    I think the skis I demoed were Elan Waveflex xTi Fusion.

    They didn't really wow me. I like slalom race skis, and the radius was right, but they skied too easily. Didn't feel like I was "on rails", but instead felt like I was "on rail".

    My conclusion about this "Rockered" thing: it is pretty bogus. Unless you have not learned to carve yet. I imagine a non-carver could carve pretty quickly with those. They feel like beginner skis, but can still be skied hard.

    They skied well in bumps, because the outside edge would not get in the way, ever.

    I said to the Elan rep after I skied them, "If I just detuned about 4 inches of my outside edge, I would effectively have a rockered ski." He agreed.

    O, and the newer Atomic Nomads can't hold a candle to the older Metrons. Too damp to be much fun. Is everybody dumbing down their skis just to be able to call them "all mountain"?

    Top skis of the day for me were Elan SLX slalom racers.
    If you liked the old atomic metrons (I LOVED my 3 pairs of B5's that I owned over the years), forget about the Nomads and give their DF 75's a try! Just a sweet, 14M radius front side power carver (and my replacement for my beloved Metrons).

    AS for the rocker concept and short radius front side power carving, well one of the owners of the shop where I buy the majority of my gear at (including my new DF 75's a few weeks ago), whose a big time racer, out it to me this way when I told him that I wanted a new front side power carver and asked about rockered options: "Do you see any world cup racers on rockered skis?" End of story on front side power carvers and rocker for now atleast in my book!
    '07--08 season: 51 Days, '08-'09 season: 55 Days, '09-'10 season: 41 Days, '10-'11 season: 49 days, '11-'12 season: 40 Days '12-'13 season: 57 days, '13-'14 season, 60 days '14-'15 season 60 days, '15-'16 season 52 days, '16-'17 season: 50 days '07-'17 seasons: 515 Days

  5. #5
    Not sure if you guys are getting what I am saying for the HALF rockered design. The skis are designated "Left" and "Right". The inside edge is traditionally cambered, and the outside edge is also cambered, but there is an alleged "rockered" component to the tip. What it comes down to, is this: the cambered outside edge is 5 inches shorter. When you put the skis together, base to base, and look at the inside edge side, they touch just about at the finish of the curve in the shovel. But when you look at the outside edge side, they touch about 5 inches further down the ski. This is why I think it is sort of bogus. All anyone has to do is detune 5 inches of the outside edge of a traditional ski to get the same effect. Remember detuning? We did it with straight skis before we started beveling the bottom edges on shaped skis....

  6. #6
    sounds like a gimmick then

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by snoseek View Post
    sounds like a gimmick then
    Ginnicks in ski equipment? No way! Never happens. All ski technology is meticulously developed through empirical methodology and ineffective technologies are never ever sold to the public. No ski manufacturer would ever lie or cheat to make a profit.

  8. #8
    I've skied rockers on every terrain I could. They handle awesome in pow and have the short feel of a snow blade everywhere else. For beginners and intermediates, this "snow blade" feel promotes easy turning and is probably a welcome change on soft groomers, bumps or in the trees.

    Expert skiers beware once you leave the pow. They're too soft for any sort of grip on hard pack and at speed they're almost unpredictable when the tips and tails are bouncing off any surface that isn't pristine. Here again, think of how a snow blade would handle on ice or at speed.

    In all my years of skiing, "There has never been an all mountain ski." Rocker technology hasn't changed that statement either. Add a pair to your quiver, but keep those GS and SL skis tuned and ready.
    Quiver:
    Rossignol Experience 88 - 172cm (All Mountain)
    Rossignol 9SL - 161 (SL carver)
    Rossignol WC GS - 181cm (GS carver)
    Rossignol Z10 - 162cm (Bumps, crud & park)
    Rossignol Super 7 - 180cm (Powder)

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Cheese View Post
    I've skied rockers on every terrain I could. They handle awesome in pow and have the short feel of a snow blade everywhere else. For beginners and intermediates, this "snow blade" feel promotes easy turning and is probably a welcome change on soft groomers, bumps or in the trees.

    Expert skiers beware once you leave the pow. They're too soft for any sort of grip on hard pack and at speed they're almost unpredictable when the tips and tails are bouncing off any surface that isn't pristine. Here again, think of how a snow blade would handle on ice or at speed.

    In all my years of skiing, "There has never been an all mountain ski." Rocker technology hasn't changed that statement either. Add a pair to your quiver, but keep those GS and SL skis tuned and ready.
    +1

    I got a pair of Nomads that I could use in the powder, glades and bumps, and even in the parks. However if it's all hardpack conditions I still use my Elan race skis. The Atomics do hold a decent edge on the hardpack, just not as good as the older racing skis. I've learned to tame the Atomics at high speeds and on hardpack, it was just some getting used to. But still, I'll always throw the Elans in the truck when I leave.

  10. #10
    Another good adage that i've heard said many times over by industry reps, shop owners and ski instructors, "good technique always trumps ski design"

    In no way do I mean this to turn into a flame war and/or am making any assertations about anyone, but for many of the general skiing public looking to expand their quiver, the best thing they could do is put that $$ they'd spend on quiver expansion towards some lessons

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