Road Bike Buying Advice - Page 3

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  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by MR. evil View Post
    Many of the upper end MTB makers are stating to use Reach and Stack for sizing bikes as its a more meaning full way to size a bike vs TT and ST lengths. I wonder if road bikes will soon follow
    I'm seeing reach and stack in more and more geo tables lately. Still not as widely adopted as it should be. I think TT and HT measurements are sufficient for getting a good size. You can always fine tune with moving the seat, flipping the stem, or getting a longer or shorter stem, as well as adjusting spacers.
    -Steve
    TheSnowWay.com "Skiing is not a sport, it is a way of life." - Otto Schniebs

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by MR. evil View Post
    Keep in mind that when buying a Spesh, Trek, Cannondale, etc you are not only paying for a bike but also the name on the down tube. You will be able to stretch your money further if you look at some of the bike company's that are not house hold names such as Jamis and Giant to name a couple.
    LOVE my Jamis Xenith Endura 2 that my LBS got me into last June
    '07--08 season: 51 Days, '08-'09 season: 55 Days, '09-'10 season: 41 Days, '10-'11 season: 49 days, '11-'12 season: 40 Days '12-'13 season: 57 days, '13-'14 season; 60 days '07-'14 seasons: 353 Days

  3. #23

    Update

    Went to a shop in Portland today to test ride the Defy.

    Because I am only 5'7, I fit nicely in between the small and the medium. I took the small out first and rode it around for a bit. Had to adjust the seat once to get the proper leg extension but after that, the bike fit well. It's looking like the small Defy 1 is going to be the winner. I want to check out a Trek 2.1 just to see how it rides but, really, at almost $200 more for similar components, it seems silly.

    Just a quick fit question, I noticed when I was riding around, my knees came up a bit higher than I am used to. (or, maybe because of body position on the MTB I never notice it) Is this normal? (they don't come up to my chest or anything that extreme) Does this make sense?

  4. #24
    If you are buying from a shop, they should make sure the bike is setup correctly for you (pretty much is the biggest reason to buy from a shop). Your contact with the bike is pedals, seat, and handlebars so those should be the three areas of potential adjustment: seat up or down, seat forward or back, or stem flipped or longer/shorter/different angle. They should be able to look at you on the bike and at least get things close.

    You are going to be more stretched out (upper body) on a road bike even with relaxed geometry compared to a MTB. But your legs shouldn't be smashing into your chest. Have the shop take a look at your fit if you buy and they'll make sure everything is good (or they should if they are a good shop).
    -Steve
    TheSnowWay.com "Skiing is not a sport, it is a way of life." - Otto Schniebs

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by riverc0il View Post
    If you are buying from a shop, they should make sure the bike is setup correctly for you (pretty much is the biggest reason to buy from a shop). Your contact with the bike is pedals, seat, and handlebars so those should be the three areas of potential adjustment: seat up or down, seat forward or back, or stem flipped or longer/shorter/different angle. They should be able to look at you on the bike and at least get things close.
    Yeah, the tech looked at me, adjusted the seat up, and decided against swapping the stem around. He thought that if we had gone up a size, we would want to switch it. We didn't fuss with the seat forward or back positioning.

  6. #26
    My recommendations; if you plan to ride 50 or less miles go for the aluminum, light and stiff, the stiffness allows for efficient transfer of power, however on rides of 50+ miles, the stiffness of aluminum allows for the pain of each bump and hole you hit to be transferred to your body. For 50+ miles, I recommend Chromoly (not as stiff or light as aluminum). Or Carbon, love my carbon frame bike, light, stiff, but absorbs the road bumps and holes, setback, expensive.

  7. #27
    2 points:

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick View Post
    I've got an old 1985 Nishiki in the basement I can sell you
    If it fits, depending on which Nishiki, you could do lots worse. I commute 26 miles r/t on a 1984 Nishiki Prestige with double-butted Tange tubing that I've been riding since I rolled it out of the bikeshop in 1984. None of the original components but it's a great frame (now converted to fixed gear).

    Unrelated to the Nishiki love: Obviously I'm fond of steel frames but my road and tri bikes have all been more recent vintage aluminum and there's no need to rule it out as I think it's the best value for money in the current bike market. The so-called harshness of alu frames can easily be mellowed out with carbon forks (most modern alu bikes have carbon fork), and running slightly wider tires (700x25), filled to around 100-110 psi instead of 120. Carbon frames are obviously all over now but you can get a better spec'd bik with alu not carbon with no significant weight penalty. And I've seen enough "catastrophic failure" pics of carbon bikes that I'd want a new high-end frame in carbon, would be leery of used and/or cheap.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by andyzee View Post
    My recommendations; if you plan to ride 50 or less miles go for the aluminum, light and stiff, the stiffness allows for efficient transfer of power, however on rides of 50+ miles, the stiffness of aluminum allows for the pain of each bump and hole you hit to be transferred to your body. For 50+ miles, I recommend Chromoly (not as stiff or light as aluminum). Or Carbon, love my carbon frame bike, light, stiff, but absorbs the road bumps and holes, setback, expensive.
    The one thing about carbon frame bikes and the ride/performance, and this comes from not just personal experience, but also from talking with and observing dozens of members of my local bike club (roadies, mountain bikers and cyclocross enthusiasts) is that once you go carbon, you're not going back to steel/aluminum
    '07--08 season: 51 Days, '08-'09 season: 55 Days, '09-'10 season: 41 Days, '10-'11 season: 49 days, '11-'12 season: 40 Days '12-'13 season: 57 days, '13-'14 season; 60 days '07-'14 seasons: 353 Days

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by drjeff View Post
    The one thing about carbon frame bikes and the ride/performance, and this comes from not just personal experience, but also from talking with and observing dozens of members of my local bike club (roadies, mountain bikers and cyclocross enthusiasts) is that once you go carbon, you're not going back to steel/aluminum
    I agree with this 100%.
    It's the reason why Carbon is selected by virtually all professional cyclists. When was the last time you saw a pro on aluminum or steel? 1995 or maybe even earlier.


    A friend just bought a full carbon Scott road bike with Shimano 105 for only $1500. It was new but a leftover, year or two old. There are deals out there if you look around.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by drjeff View Post
    The one thing about carbon frame bikes and the ride/performance, and this comes from not just personal experience, but also from talking with and observing dozens of members of my local bike club (roadies, mountain bikers and cyclocross enthusiasts) is that once you go carbon, you're not going back to steel/aluminum
    Yep, for sure. When I went from aluminum to carbon, I couldn't believe the difference.


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