Any Crossfitters on the board? - Page 2

AlpineZone

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by deadheadskier View Post
    That's a good deal. Most of the time I see prices like 10 sessions for $150.
    Most places have a monthly fee for unlimited classes, but do offer drop-in rates.
    Whatever hits the fan will not be distributed evenly.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by wa-loaf View Post
    I should quit drinking for a while to really make some progress with weight, but that's probably not going to happen ....
    I've said this to myself probably 100 times! Usually then followed up with something like "because I am working out a bunch, I can KEEP drinking!"
    '07--08 season: 51 Days, '08-'09 season: 55 Days, '09-'10 season: 41 Days, '10-'11 season: 49 days, '11-'12 season: 40 Days '12-'13 season: 57 days, '13-'14 season, 60 days '14-'15 season 60 days, '15-'16 season 52 days, '16-'17 season: 50 days '07-'17 seasons: 515 Days

  3. #13
    I did Crossfit from 2006-2009, but it was never my main goal. I was mainly into endurance sports and used Crossfit for strength/conditioning.

    Crossfit is very good at forcing people to get into shape quickly. They do this by (generally) making every workout into a competition. That is not sustainable long term and WILL lead to injuries.

    When Crossfit is done correctly (with proper build ups and intensity) it very much resembles most proper strength and conditioning programs, it's just easier to follow because of the CULTure of the Crossfit gyms. THERE ARE LOTS OF CROSSFIT GYMS DOING THINGS "RIGHT", but there are probably more that are not.

    All that being said, my conditioning workouts are still Crossfit inspired, but they aren't very far away from what I was doing while training for hockey as a kid.

    There's all kinds of other stupidity around Crossfit, long sets of Olympic lifting, repeatedly hammering the same muscle groups over and over (you did 100 pullups yesterday, you'll do 100 more today!) that have been proven to directly result in injuries.
    Not to mention they are the only exercise group in the world that has to actively teach each other about rhabdomyolysis because it's a legitimate concern.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by ironhippy View Post
    THERE ARE LOTS OF CROSSFIT GYMS DOING THINGS "RIGHT", but there are probably more that are not.
    I think this is the key. Gotta find a place you are comfortable with that will build you up and not just throw you in.
    Whatever hits the fan will not be distributed evenly.

  5. #15
    so was crossfit a good training program for skiing ?
    shit happens, wear a helmet.

    2016/17
    MT Snow - 12.30 1.7 1.29 2.4 2.11
    Attitash - 2.17
    Black MTN - 2.18
    Wildcat - 2.19
    Eldora - 4.7
    Snowmass - 4.10
    Aspen - 4.11

  6. #16
    Scruffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    In the shadow of the moon.
    Posts
    948
    Quote Originally Posted by gmcunni View Post
    so was crossfit a good training program for skiing ?
    In a word, no.

    x-fit is good at conditioning you for x-fit. You're usually too toast for anything else, unless you really discipline yourself and don't push like the culture pressures you to. I've been x-fitting for 6 years now. I only go 2-3 times a week, usually 2, sometimes 1, or even 0 since I'm out of town a lot. I really have to dump my ego and scale for what I want to accomplish, and not what everyone else is doing, or what the trainers want you to accomplish. x-fit is good for 20 somethings that want to be military buff. If you're in your 40's or up, you're going to have delayed onset muscle soreness on top of delayed onset muscle soreness. This effects your skiing, running, biking, etc..

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by gmcunni View Post
    so was crossfit a good training program for skiing ?
    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy View Post
    In a word, no.

    x-fit is good at conditioning you for x-fit. You're usually too toast for anything else, unless you really discipline yourself and don't push like the culture pressures you to. I've been x-fitting for 6 years now. I only go 2-3 times a week, usually 2, sometimes 1, or even 0 since I'm out of town a lot. I really have to dump my ego and scale for what I want to accomplish, and not what everyone else is doing, or what the trainers want you to accomplish. x-fit is good for 20 somethings that want to be military buff. If you're in your 40's or up, you're going to have delayed onset muscle soreness on top of delayed onset muscle soreness. This effects your skiing, running, biking, etc..
    I disagree. I didn't get much skiing in this year, but when I went to Jackson it made a big difference in me being able to ski hard for a lot longer than usual. I'm still going 4-5 times a week, and love the progress and when I can beat the 20 year olds (sometimes). I do keep a mind on if muscles or body parts are getting over worked and then just take an extra day off or scale the workouts. Would I do a killer WOD the day before a big ski trip? No because that's dumb. Over all I'm much fitter than last year and that translates to all sports. I do need to up the cardio now that the weather is getting nicer. Our workouts tend to consist of a strength portion (working squats for example) and then the WOD of the day; these are what really work you, but most are pretty short coming around 10-15 minutes. Adding a couple 30-40 minute runs a week helps me burn the fat off easier.
    Whatever hits the fan will not be distributed evenly.

  8. #18
    Scruffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    In the shadow of the moon.
    Posts
    948
    Quote Originally Posted by wa-loaf View Post
    I disagree. I didn't get much skiing in this year, but when I went to Jackson it made a big difference in me being able to ski hard for a lot longer than usual. I'm still going 4-5 times a week, and love the progress and when I can beat the 20 year olds (sometimes). I do keep a mind on if muscles or body parts are getting over worked and then just take an extra day off or scale the workouts. Would I do a killer WOD the day before a big ski trip? No because that's dumb. Over all I'm much fitter than last year and that translates to all sports. I do need to up the cardio now that the weather is getting nicer. Our workouts tend to consist of a strength portion (working squats for example) and then the WOD of the day; these are what really work you, but most are pretty short coming around 10-15 minutes. Adding a couple 30-40 minute runs a week helps me burn the fat off easier.

    Well, I guess it would also depend on what level of conditioning an individual was before starting x-fit, what other forms of exercise/training they do, how old they are, what their training goals are, etc..

    I was already fit, for the sports I trained for, before I started doing x-fit. Sure, my overall conditioning has changed as I work other muscles or the same ones differently. x-fit tends to be more weight training centric, which develops fast twitch muscle fibers that fatique quicker. My road biking and running has suffered as my muscles changed and my training time concentrated differently. My ski endurance has not changed much.

  9. #19
    Scruffy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    In the shadow of the moon.
    Posts
    948
    http://www.backcountry.com/explore/t...55963_ac3b532b

    I'm still doing crossfit, but I'm working more eccentric workouts in as ski season nears.

    Check out the article linked above for a reason why heavily weighted squats are not the best training modality for skiing.

    My biggest mistake as a strength and conditioning coach occurred the first year I designed a dry land training cycle for local skiers here in Jackson. Skiing is leg-intensive, and so was my program. My athletes did thousands of heavy front squats, back squats, loaded lunges, dead lifts, Bulgarian Split Squats … we hammered the legs. I completed the training sessions myself and we all built stronger legs, as measured by gym numbers. I was super proud of myself.
    But the mountain isn’t the gym, and she wasn’t impressed.
    I knew I had made a huge programming mistake my first run at the Jackson Hole Ski Resort, opening day, early in December. Halfway down the slope, my legs were dying! I had to stop and rest. I couldn’t believe it. I barely managed to ski half the day, before retreating to the lodge to cry in my hot chocolate.
    Where had I messed up? Upset athletes and intense research, including calls to the Olympic training center, drove me to the answer.
    My dryland program had focused on concentric leg strength. But alpine skiing demands eccentric leg strength.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy View Post
    http://www.backcountry.com/explore/t...55963_ac3b532b

    I'm still doing crossfit, but I'm working more eccentric workouts in as ski season nears.

    Check out the article linked above for a reason why heavily weighted squats are not the best training modality for skiing.
    That's a good article. I'll say my crossfit does incorporate a lot of lunges and air squats into the workouts. I'll point this out to my coach though.

    Whatever hits the fan will not be distributed evenly.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:33 PM.