What's the Best Lesson that You've Learned from Your Time Hiking and Backpacking?

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  1. #1

    Lightbulb What's the Best Lesson that You've Learned from Your Time Hiking and Backpacking?

    9 Lessons We Learn from the Backcountry



    There's no question that time spent in the great outdoors can teach us some pretty serious lessons...and some not so serious ones, too. What's your favorite lesson that you've learned in your time hiking and backpacking?

  2. #2
    Did not hike much in New England, my wife hated getting eaten alive. We used deet to ward them off but somehow they still came. However, since we have been out in CO we started hiking again and so far bugs are limited. Important to stay on trail though that are some dangerous animals out here beside those large felines. Wife almost stepped on this!
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    If you take what the mountain gives you, you will always have fun!

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by dlague View Post
    Did not hike much in New England, my wife hated getting eaten alive. We used deet to ward them off but somehow they still came. However, since we have been out in CO we started hiking again and so far bugs are limited. Important to stay on trail though that are some dangerous animals out here beside those large felines. Wife almost stepped on this!
    Yikes!

  4. #4
    bigbog's Avatar
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    Nothing extroardinary,
    Prepare enough to be one with nature and treat the outdoors/wildlife with respect and you won't have very many issues. If you pack first aid for possible injury, the odds are you'll stay healthy.
    SteveD

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bigbog View Post
    Nothing extroardinary,
    Prepare enough to be one with nature and treat the outdoors/wildlife with respect and you won't have very many issues. If you pack first aid for possible injury, the odds are you'll stay healthy.
    That's a great point. First aid is always worth the weight - if for no other reason than to thwart Murphy's Law!

  6. #6
    Abubob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbog View Post
    Nothing extroardinary,
    Prepare enough to be one with nature and treat the outdoors/wildlife with respect and you won't have very many issues. If you pack first aid for possible injury, the odds are you'll stay healthy.
    Quote Originally Posted by ianscampbell View Post
    That's a great point. First aid is always worth the weight - if for no other reason than to thwart Murphy's Law!
    I learned the hard way why I should pack an ace bandage and some gauze. Just as important is what NOT to pack. But deciding what is too much takes some dialing in and will change with the season and terrain.
    "Happiness equals reality minus expectations." Tommy Magliozzi

  7. #7
    I learned that all Bears are smarter than your average Bear. They are amazing at figuring out how to get to your food hanging between two trees. I now put my food in a bear proof canister.

    I have learned that tents with with large rain flys that drop water on the ground at least 1.5 feet away from your tent will keep you nicely dry. My North Face tent I purchased in 1973 is much better than anything you can buy today.

    If you going on a day hike that may mean hiking out in the dark you will probably be hiking out in the dark. Therefore bring at least two flashlights that work. That hiking out of the woods in the dark with no moon and no flashlight is way overrated.

    Weather that is about 35 to 40 degrees and rain is a real problem trying to keep your body temp regulated. No really!!!!!

    Don't get lost and do your homework before entering the woods.

    Always leave a note where you will be entering and leaving the woods.

    Last but not least. Assume your cell phone will not work.

  8. #8
    Abubob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catskills View Post
    I learned that all Bears are smarter than your average Bear. They are amazing at figuring out how to get to your food hanging between two trees. I now put my food in a bear proof canister.

    I have learned that tents with with large rain flys that drop water on the ground at least 1.5 feet away from your tent will keep you nicely dry. My North Face tent I purchased in 1973 is much better than anything you can buy today.

    If you going on a day hike that may mean hiking out in the dark you will probably be hiking out in the dark. Therefore bring at least two flashlights that work. That hiking out of the woods in the dark with no moon and no flashlight is way overrated.

    Weather that is about 35 to 40 degrees and rain is a real problem trying to keep your body temp regulated. No really!!!!!

    Don't get lost and do your homework before entering the woods.

    Always leave a note where you will be entering and leaving the woods.

    Last but not least. Assume your cell phone will not work.
    ++1
    "Happiness equals reality minus expectations." Tommy Magliozzi

  9. #9
    You’re stronger than you think:
    Love this quote:

    No matter how tiny or weak you are, backpacking teaches us how much we can surprise ourselves. Yeah, perhaps your backpack may be the same size of you (if it is, then pack lighter!), but at the end of the day, you carried it without any problems. It may have been uncomfortable at times, but it wasn’t impossible.


    So true...

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