Northeast Temps vs. Colorado - Page 2

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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by billo View Post
    I disagree. The coldest days in Colorado are clear and calm and the thinner, drier air makes it feel much warmer. Meanwhile, in the NE the coldest days often have wind.
    I guess you have a good point with the air content, but I wear the same stuff and have no ill effects. Then again, I'm not a bundle up in 100 layers person either, I dress pretty lightly. Thin underarmour, maybe a sweatshirt (or not), and a jacket, that's it.
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  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by BenedictGomez View Post
    I guess you have a good point with the air content, but I wear the same stuff and have no ill effects. Then again, I'm not a bundle up in 100 layers person either, I dress pretty lightly. Thin underarmour, maybe a sweatshirt (or not), and a jacket, that's it.
    I have been gearing up the exact same way I did back east. T-shirt, thin base layer, UA sweatshirt or Spyder pullover then Jacket. Ski pant with a single base layer. same mittens and socks. I never wore a face mask back east even on the coldest days and to do not now.



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  3. #13
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  4. #14
    After reading through this thread. I thought it through a bit and since we have been here we have not had any days that were below zero. In fact our coldest day was around 5 degrees which is still very cold. Someone mentioned that the coldest days here are clear and calm - nope. Breck and A Basin can get pretty windy and cold just because of their exposure. The top of A Basin especially can feel very cold with the wind. Coldest days have been windy and cloudy. Generally due to a cold front. That being said nothing compared to New England deep freezes. Overall, I think it is more pleasant but I also think that New England is more prone to wider temperature swings where there are thaws in January and then get cold as hell in February. But that is what makes it good sometimes - fewer people.

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    2016-2017 target - 50

    If you take what the mountain gives you, you will always have fun!

  5. #15
    I do get excited when there is frigid cold for a few weekends mid season due to the lack of crowds.

    So overall you'd say CO does not get as cold, but is more consistently cold?

  6. #16
    I think you have to factor in the humidity. It's much higher on the lower elevation eastern mountains which will make it feel colder at the same temp as the high elevation low humidity west. I have never been skiing in the Pacific Northwest, but would suspect it feels colder there as well.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by dlague View Post
    After reading through this thread. I thought it through a bit and since we have been here we have not had any days that were below zero. In fact our coldest day was around 5 degrees which is still very cold. Someone mentioned that the coldest days here are clear and calm - nope. Breck and A Basin can get pretty windy and cold just because of their exposure. The top of A Basin especially can feel very cold with the wind. Coldest days have been windy and cloudy. Generally due to a cold front. That being said nothing compared to New England deep freezes. Overall, I think it is more pleasant but I also think that New England is more prone to wider temperature swings where there are thaws in January and then get cold as hell in February. But that is what makes it good sometimes - fewer people.
    Not the same at all as my experience. Colorado Springs gets wide variation in temperatures, snowing one week and warm the next. I agree that the Springs doesn't get the bitter cold the mountains do, but no one skis in the Springs anyway. While I was living in the Colorado mountains, well below zero was the norm. The coldest winter was 3 weeks of 20 below weather, meaning that for 3 weeks the temp did not get above -20. The coldest night was -39F at base elevations. My truck barely started at -35F, I didn't even try at -39. I hitchhiked into work that day. Cars that started had block heaters that were plugged in.

    Yes, cold days at Breck can be windy, but those are cold days in the +15 to -10F range. Add some wind chill in. Once it goes below that in true temperature, it's usually a pool of cold air with a high pressure bubble settling in from the Yukon, and there is blue sky and little wind and the bottom falls out of the thermometer.

    The air below -20 has a 'bite' to it. It is NOT the same as -20 wind chill. It burns a little breathing. I think that just like the altitude, you acclimate to it eventually as the vessels close to the skin adapt to keeping more warm blood flow. I remember not layering up too much more for that cold, (I had a very warm down parka) but you better stay active. I lived in long underwear that stretch, indoors, in bed, work. Only came off for showers. Let me tell you the burn of cold car seat vinyl at -35F is something to experience.

    Quote Originally Posted by skiur View Post
    I think you have to factor in the humidity. It's much higher on the lower elevation eastern mountains which will make it feel colder at the same temp as the high elevation low humidity west. I have never been skiing in the Pacific Northwest, but would suspect it feels colder there as well.


    No, for several reasons. First, there is almost no moisture (of significance) in the air once you get below zero. Second, the source of the cold air for NE is Canada, think Alberta Clipper. That air mass is both cold and dry. Moist air masses come from the Atlantic Ocean in a classic Nor'easter scenario. That weather brings snow (or rain) in the well above zero range, frequently in the 20's. So for that air mass, yes it has more water content than out west, and yes it will feel colder at 25F in Vermont than 25F in Colorado. But a damp 25F feels like late spring compared to 30 below. I've lived in both, and I think the damp cold is colder business is more urban legend than reality.

    Real cold is also different as physical properties change. Snow get less slippery and squeaky. Grease and oil thicken and won't rotate at first. Rubber (as in car tires) stiffens to where it won't return to round. Bearings fail. Fan belts snap. Batteries have minimal power. Glass is very brittle.

    It does make sense that high elevation air will feel less cold than low elevation air at the same temperature and humidity. Less dense air will conduct less heat away from your body. I'm not sure that's anywhere near the major factor though.

    Last edited by mister moose; Oct 15, 2017 at 2:43 PM.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ALLSKIING View Post
    Bump
    Why? lol
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