Mogul Skis

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Thread: Mogul Skis

  1. #1

    Talking Mogul Skis

    Always enjoyed skiing bumps. Getting more "into it" recently. Started thinking of picking up a dedicated bump ski.

    I'm 5'-8" and about 165-175lbs, I consider myself a pretty aggressive skier. I currently ski on a pair of G3 Saints at 176cm for my non-powder and non-tele days.

    What size bump ski should I be looking at?

    I saw the K2 244's, Dynastar Twister's, and the Elan Bloodline's . Are they any good? Trying not to break the bank here either... Open to used if needed.

    Thanks in advance and Merry Christmas!




  2. #2
    I think the 173 k2's or the 175 twisters would be perfect. I'm slightly taller than you and have the 173 k2s and really like them. Have also skied the twisters and I really couldn't tell much difference. You can find the k2s on eBay for under 500 and that includes the look pivot 14 bindings, which is a great deal.


    Sent from my iPhone using AlpineZone

  3. #3
    Nice! Hopefully mogul skiing makes a comeback. I’m just under 5’10 and around 170 pounds and have 175 twisters. It’s so hard to demo mogul skis so I’m not sure if longer would be better, but I’m happy with the size. I also got a new pair on eBay with look pivot bindings for under 500 bucks total ( in April a few years ago so not sure what the price is now). I prefer them over my Volkl kendos except for in powder or heavy wet snow. Barely feels like you have any skis on your feet they are so light.

  4. #4
    How aggressive do you ski bumps? And for that matter, HOW do you ski bumps? The K2s are alright... they're a little soft, and they don't hold an edge particularly well. I skied K2 bump skis for a while, but find them too squirrelly at this point. I'd consider the Twisters a step up from the K2s. They're the ski of choice among most serious recreational bump skiers. If you want to take it to the next level of serious bump skiing, ID One and Hart are the way to go. They're expensive, but they perform. You can occasionally find good deals on eBay. Shaman is another option now as well, though I've not skied on them. I've been skiing the same pair of Hart F17 WC skis for 8 or 9 years now. No joke. Well more than 100 days on those poor things. They don't have the rebound they used to have, but they still rip, and they hold an edge way better than K2 or Twister.

    As for size... 170-175cm would be about right, I think. And don't forget to couple those bump skis with some good, short poles. At 5'-8", you probably need 40" poles. And Look Pivot bindings are ideal. But most importantly, get a binding that can be mounted flush on the skis without a lifter plate.

    And if anyone needs proof that 8 year old F17s can still perform, here's the evidence (I'm in the retro red Fate getup at 0:51, 1:51, etc.):



    I'm happy to be back east. But I do miss being close enough for whimsical day trips to WP/MJ.
    Last edited by BushMogulMaster; Dec 24, 2017 at 5:04 PM.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by BushMogulMaster View Post
    How aggressive do you ski bumps? And for that matter, HOW do you ski bumps?
    Exactly.

    When you watch bump skiers, and look at their skis, you'll see at least 4 distinct categories.

    Category 1. Competition bump skiers. These skiers ski the zipperline, and are on a modern dedicated bump ski.

    Category 2. Old stylers on 200cm straight skis, fewer turns, more thumping.

    Category 3. Recreational advanced bump skiers. These skiers are also in the fall line, but with more tail swishing and less absorbtion. Less impact, they rarely take the full mogul head on, but can when necessary. Typical skis are 80 to 95 cm freeride or twin tips.

    Category 4. Dolphin turners. These skiers are carving wide arcs down bumps, noticeably different than zipperlining. No pivot slips at all. They come at the trough from an entirely different angle, crossing the fall line more but with far less skidding. Skis are stiff tortionally, more sidecut, and frequently are sub 85mm. Turns are aggressively unweighted, with air over the mogul top not uncommon.

    Identify your style, then consider your skis.

    (Disclaimer: not all skiers are limited to 1 style, or type ski.)

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by mister moose View Post
    Exactly.

    When you watch bump skiers, and look at their skis, you'll see at least 4 distinct categories.

    Category 1. Competition bump skiers. These skiers ski the zipperline, and are on a modern dedicated bump ski.

    Category 2. Old stylers on 200cm straight skis, fewer turns, more thumping.

    Category 3. Recreational advanced bump skiers. These skiers are also in the fall line, but with more tail swishing and less absorbtion. Less impact, they rarely take the full mogul head on, but can when necessary. Typical skis are 80 to 95 cm freeride or twin tips.

    Category 4. Dolphin turners. These skiers are carving wide arcs down bumps, noticeably different than zipperlining. No pivot slips at all. They come at the trough from an entirely different angle, crossing the fall line more but with far less skidding. Skis are stiff tortionally, more sidecut, and frequently are sub 85mm. Turns are aggressively unweighted, with air over the mogul top not uncommon.

    Identify your style, then consider your skis.

    (Disclaimer: not all skiers are limited to 1 style, or type ski.)
    I say who cares how you ski. You want some mogul skis then just get them. To me, you don’t have to be a pro to ski on dedicated mogul skis. As long as you like moguls they will make you better and they are still fun on groomers ( at least mine are). Also sounds like you already have a pair that fits into the other “categories”. Good advice on the poles as you will want short poles, otherwise your pole plants will be over your head when your knees are bent.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by mister moose View Post
    Exactly.

    Category 3. Recreational advanced bump skiers. These skiers are also in the fall line, but with more tail swishing and less absorbtion. Less impact, they rarely take the full mogul head on, but can when necessary. Typical skis are 80 to 95 cm freeride or twin tips.

    (Disclaimer: not all skiers are limited to 1 style, or type ski.)
    Senor Moose, any specific recommendations for the Cat 3 bumper?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty4514 View Post
    I say who cares how you ski. You want some mogul skis then just get them. To me, you don’t have to be a pro to ski on dedicated mogul skis. As long as you like moguls they will make you better and they are still fun on groomers ( at least mine are). Also sounds like you already have a pair that fits into the other “categories”. Good advice on the poles as you will want short poles, otherwise your pole plants will be over your head when your knees are bent.
    Fair point but I think mister moose's post should be regarded, and is the best post yet in this thread overall.

    I am a Cat 3 bump skier who occasionally zipper lines and tends to ski Cat 4 style when the bumps are smaller or more random.

    Cat 1 and Cat 2 bump skiers would want a much different ski than me. Cat 3 and Cat 4 bump skiers can use 1 ski quiver all-mountain skis.

  9. #9
    I can't comment on which specific skis, but it sounds to me like the OP wants a ski that is best designed for ripping a zipper.

    I've only skied one pair of modern bump skis, a set of Harts. The performance was stunning compared to any other kind of ski. The equivalent would be skiing a true race ski down some gates and comparing it to other kinds of skis. Night and day.

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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by bdfreetuna View Post
    Fair point but I think mister moose's post should be regarded, and is the best post yet in this thread overall.

    I am a Cat 3 bump skier who occasionally zipper lines and tends to ski Cat 4 style when the bumps are smaller or more random.

    Cat 1 and Cat 2 bump skiers would want a much different ski than me. Cat 3 and Cat 4 bump skiers can use 1 ski quiver all-mountain skis.
    Moose’s post is well thought out, but sorry I disagree. Having skied on both mogul skis and all mountain skis I can’t see a scenario where mogul skis wouldn’t be better in moguls (except if there is fresh snow on them). Doesn’t matter if you are Mikael Kingsbury or just starting. They are lighter, narrower, quicker, more flexible (usually in the tips), and still hold a good edge when well tuned, and all categories of skiers would benefit from using them. I do agree with the third post (Mogulmaster) that there are definitely differences in different mogul ski brands which should be considered, but at that point it probably takes a certain level of “category 1” skier to even notice.

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