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Thread: Mogul Skis

  1. #21
    I am a recent Twister convert. Switched from Hart F17 Classic STs mid-season last year. The stiffness and extra side-cut of the STs made them a nice option on groomers, but the Twisters blow them away in the bumps, especially icy NE bumps, where the ease with which they can be skidded and set on edge are probably their best quality. In soft spring bumps, pretty much anything works fine. A lot of folks are on ID-ones these days, but they are extremely expensive and hard to demo unless you go to a camp. They have a "beginner's" bump ski in their line-up that seems interesting, given that most dedicated bump skis are designed and intended for competitors.


  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by BushMogulMaster View Post
    How aggressive do you ski bumps? And for that matter, HOW do you ski bumps? The K2s are alright... they're a little soft, and they don't hold an edge particularly well. I skied K2 bump skis for a while, but find them too squirrelly at this point. I'd consider the Twisters a step up from the K2s. They're the ski of choice among most serious recreational bump skiers. If you want to take it to the next level of serious bump skiing, ID One and Hart are the way to go. They're expensive, but they perform. You can occasionally find good deals on eBay. Shaman is another option now as well, though I've not skied on them. I've been skiing the same pair of Hart F17 WC skis for 8 or 9 years now. No joke. Well more than 100 days on those poor things. They don't have the rebound they used to have, but they still rip, and they hold an edge way better than K2 or Twister.

    As for size... 170-175cm would be about right, I think. And don't forget to couple those bump skis with some good, short poles. At 5'-8", you probably need 40" poles. And Look Pivot bindings are ideal. But most importantly, get a binding that can be mounted flush on the skis without a lifter plate.

    And if anyone needs proof that 8 year old F17s can still perform, here's the evidence (I'm in the retro red Fate getup at 0:51, 1:51, etc.):



    I'm happy to be back east. But I do miss being close enough for whimsical day trips to WP/MJ.

    Great video, that is how I would like to ski bumps. Referring to Mister Mooses post, I would like to be a Cat1, but I would say I fall somewhere between, more like a Cat3 or Cat4. I can ski bumps zipper line, but only on a more moderate pitch or for a shorter distance (I need to work on my stamina before crushing T2B bumps). I love to crush spring bumps but want a ski that can help me crush icy moguls that we all too often find on the east coast that much better.

    I saw a mogul clinic at K-mart that is ran by some olympians and has different levels, so I was thinking of doing that this season too.

    I would love a pair of Hart F17s based on what I have read, but there are a little out of my price range!


    I can't comment on which specific skis, but it sounds to me like the OP wants a ski that is best designed for ripping a zipper.

    I've only skied one pair of modern bump skis, a set of Harts. The performance was stunning compared to any other kind of ski. The equivalent would be skiing a true race ski down some gates and comparing it to other kinds of skis. Night and day.
    Exactly. I used to race and nothing compares to using a slalom ski on a slalom course. A one-ski quiver is nice, but in reality you will never hit the same performance as a specialized ski. This is one of the reasons I want a dedicated bump ski. Same goes with my Powder skis, you can't compare an all-mountain ski to fat powder planks...

    A lot of folks are on ID-ones these days, but they are extremely expensive and hard to demo unless you go to a camp
    That seems to be one of the biggest problems too. I want to demo but there aren't many around here. I've been leaning towards the Twisters, most like 175 based on what I have read thus far.

    Thank you everyone for the well thought out replies here.

  3. #23
    On another note, any idea why the K2 244's aren't on their website?

  4. #24
    Btw, where can you demo Twisters in SoVT? (preferably near Killington, but near Okemo or Magic would also be OK)

  5. #25
    Given the common scenario that skiing bump runs also involves skiing a lot of other terrain that is usually hard-pack, I would be interested in hearing about skier experiences with the Dynastar Twister beyond bump runs. I realize that the narrower Twister would not work well for powder, but on the rare powder day I would plan to use my existing wider old K2 Extremes which work quite well for me in powder.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by JimS View Post
    Given the common scenario that skiing bump runs also involves skiing a lot of other terrain that is usually hard-pack, I would be interested in hearing about skier experiences with the Dynastar Twister beyond bump runs. I realize that the narrower Twister would not work well for powder, but on the rare powder day I would plan to use my existing wider old K2 Extremes which work quite well for me in powder.
    With the exception of loose granular (since they are so light and can get deflected a little easier), they are good on hard pack and ice. This obviously assumes they are well tuned. Just don’t expect to be carving trenches.

  7. #27

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    So to chime in as a long time bump skier. Hands down, F17 Classic (not the ST), is great in bumps and hard pack. It has a GS cut with some modifications so it blows away the twisters\ k2\ idone on all other conditions. I have owned 5 pair of them, 175cm. They now have the Classic ST II which I demo'd last spring and it is equally an amazing ski.

  8. #28
    What's the best way to demo a pair of F17s? Even buying a new pair doesn't look easy. It's like the Hart website is trying to discourage buying them. They don't even have pictures or details of the 2018 models.


    Sent from my iPhone using AlpineZone

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Griswold View Post
    What's the best way to demo a pair of F17s? Even buying a new pair doesn't look easy. It's like the Hart website is trying to discourage buying them. They don't even have pictures or details of the 2018 models.
    Yeah, I got the distinct impression that Hart might be going out of business soon. Does not inspire confidence.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by eatskisleep View Post

    I saw the K2 244's, Dynastar Twister's, and the Elan Bloodline's . Are they any good? Trying not to break the bank here either... Open to used if needed.
    IMO, Twister has great value when cost is factored in. Along with a seeded runs, I take mine into the glades and natural trails. It takes a beating on hidden rocks and to a lesser extent tree/bush roots.

    As mentioned they are narrow so it makes for quicker turns. IMO, the important item not mentioned is the flex pattern, the tip is soft while the tail is stiff. When timing the load at the front part of the skis is right, you can control your descent, in speed and direction. That coupled with absorption is how skiers can maintain a direct line in a bump field. The stiff tail act as a leverage to 'pry' yourself over center in case you get in the back seat. That's why mogul skis have more of center mount than the new model skis where the latter has less tail length but it looks like rockers have the boot mount more toward center. IMO, if you want to ski a direct line, you will have to change your technique toward a mogul turn, which means front loading and some pivoting. Pure carving and going arc to arc is pointless and dangerous in the narrow trails we have here in NE. So I don't see why having more shape than a twister is needed but that's my opinion.

    What I have found after skiing on twisters for over 10 years (end of my third pair) is the ski will lose it torsional rigidity. That edge hold on boiler plate isn't as solid, yes... sharpening them will help but I can still feel the difference to a freshly mounted twister. I bought an old Volkl rebellion mogul ski (89 63 78 ), the underfoot is thicker than the twister by ~ 1/4 inch. When I took them out it with hard pack and boilerplate mix in the troughs and flat sections, they provided a solid edge hold. I haven't made the Volkl my everyday ski yet so I can't say anything about durability.

    As for bindings, try to find deals for Look/Rossi or Salomon
    bindings. Find the models that have elasticity travel at the toe piece. If you hit the face of the mogul the wrong way (and it happens), these types of bindings will give a little before a release. As an example, my old marker bindings will release on the slightest jarring, it got to a point I can tell at what angle and where at the underfoot. The new marker bindings, the royal series have elasticity travel but i think they are too expensive. Look/Rossi and Salomon are still the better value. Look has been the choice for most free ride types and Sallys have bindings just as light as the Markers.
    I rather be @ss noodling

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