Poison ivy spotting

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  1. #1
    Edd's Avatar
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    Nov 2006
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    Poison ivy spotting

    Article I just read with some basic info and some small hope for future treatments.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...ruins-your-sum

    Iíve had it twice, once from hiking in Sequoia National Park in CA and another time after my vehicle broke down off of 495 in Mass. Both were awful for me so Iím keenly interested in not catching again. Since the CA incident, Iíve never hiked in shorts again, nor will I.

    The article states that the ďleaves of 3Ē thing still holds true but I see shit like that all the time so Iím not confident in spotting it. It amazes me that we donít have a stronger handle on treating cases after catching it.

  2. #2
    I got it so many times as a kid, I'm beginning to think I've become immune to it. It's been probably 20 years since I last got it. My childhood experiences with it were pretty awful. A few times resulted in having to go on a steroid treatment as my eyes became swollen shut.

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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Edd View Post
    Article I just read with some basic info and some small hope for future treatments.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...ruins-your-sum

    I’ve had it twice, once from hiking in Sequoia National Park in CA and another time after my vehicle broke down off of 495 in Mass. Both were awful for me so I’m keenly interested in not catching again. Since the CA incident, I’ve never hiked in shorts again, nor will I.

    The article states that the “leaves of 3” thing still holds true but I see shit like that all the time so I’m not confident in spotting it. It amazes me that we don’t have a stronger handle on treating cases after catching it.
    We eat the stuff in Pa. ....Its everywhere . Seriously people have different sensitivities. As a kid in a new house with parents that were clueless they pulled it off the trees and burned it . I had it everywhere, on one eye , it was a horrible week for me but one thing that helps is swim a heavily chlorinated pool .



    I have tons of it on my property and rarely get it any more . My neighbor gets it from a distance . A couple years ago I cut a few trees down and the wind happened to be blowing toward her house 200' away . She had a moderate outbreak without even touching it.

    We also have poison Sumac ..looks like a small walnut tree.

  4. #4
    machski's Avatar
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    Yeah, both my wife and brother are hyper allergic to it but I never get it. So bad fory wife, she'll get it from our pets after they contact it.

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  5. #5
    Interesting article, I'm glad they showed some varieties. Poison Ivy is really an interesting plant in all it's phenotypes and adaptations.

    Never have caught it even after inadvertently rolling around in it as a kid. Not trying to test that theory but so far so good.

    Really interesting plant though, to be honest I think the classification system is incorrect and there are at least a 2-3 sub-species. Poison Oak should also be a sub-species, it's hardly distinct from the shrubbier phenotypes of Poison Ivy itself. Poison Sumac isn't a true Sumac and basically another shrubby kind of Poison Ivy except with more leaves.

    I've also seen *plenty* of 5 leaf poison ivy. While the 3 leaf thing is a good starting point, this plant is really closer to something like Marijuana where the number of leaves and shape of the leaves can greatly vary (within limits).

    edit: should have specified the 5 leaf variety come in 2 types... one is regular poison Ivy with an extra pair of leaves down the stem. The second is 5 leaves coming out of the same axis, which is known as Virginia Creeper at least in our part of the country, but can have similar itchy/rash effects as Poison Ivy.

    IMO all adaptive/phenotypical varieties of the same thing and take caution with certain 5 leaf look-alikes.
    Last edited by bdfreetuna; Jun 18, 2018 at 10:22 AM.
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