SOLO - Wilderness First Responder Review

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  1. #1

    SOLO - Wilderness First Responder Review

    I had just returned home from a 9-day Wilderness First Responder course through SOLO Wilderness & Emergency Medicine. I was originally dredding the long class, but it turned out to be one of the best vacations ever.



    Joslin was our instructor and she was very informative with just the right touch of slapstick to keep people laughing and alert. The hands-on approach with full make-up scenarios helped to keep us on our toes for the unexpected. By the end we were all very confident in our abilities to treat injuries in the backcountry and had an absolute blast in the process.

    I highly recommend taking this course.
    Find me at www.ctxguide.com Connecticut Explorer's Guide

  2. #2
    Cool, I've been considering... but it's just hard to justify taking so much vacation days for that course... I already have other courses I'd like to take too, so I gotta make a choice...

    Are you planning on doing any backcountry guiding now?
    Sign, sign everywhere a sign... pointing out the trails, can\'t make up my mind.

  3. #3
    I used to be an alpine backpacking guide in the Black Hills of South Dakota and the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming. I am now in Therapeutic Recreation and will be leading shorter excursions into the backcountry for helping to treat abused and neglected youth.

    Again, the class is really worth the time. I wish I had brought my wife to enjoy the class too.
    Find me at www.ctxguide.com Connecticut Explorer's Guide

  4. #4
    Very cool, and you'll be putting it to very good use!
    Sign, sign everywhere a sign... pointing out the trails, can\'t make up my mind.

  5. #5
    I have often thought about taking this course. I have the vacation time (working at a college means not much going on in the summers) ...just a matter of coughing up a few hundred bucks which is big for poor struggling college grads
    I'm at home and at ease on a track that I know not,
    And restless and lost on a road that I know.
    --Henry Lawson

  6. #6
    The first time that I took Advanced Wilderness First Aid was when my employer paid for it. I would suggest getting a summer job as a guide at a summer camp or outfitter and let them foot the bill.
    Find me at www.ctxguide.com Connecticut Explorer's Guide

  7. #7
    yeah, already have that full time job thing. Maybe I can convince the outting dept on campus to pay for it
    I'm at home and at ease on a track that I know not,
    And restless and lost on a road that I know.
    --Henry Lawson

  8. #8

    Thumbs up Wilderness First Aid

    Dredging up an old topic.

    I just signed up for the basic Wilderness First Aid course, it's 2 8-hour days over the weekend. Vendor is SOLO, sponsored by AMC. For my personal use and any unfortunate soul I may happen upon. It's also well under $200 which makes the course financially more palatable to the average hiker than the Advanced or First Responder.

    It is dreadful to stand around not knowing what to do or not to do. I've previously taken Red Cross First Aid and CPR and this looks to be head and shoulders above that. I call the RC courses "city first aid" where you know you'll have an EMT onsite in 5-10 mins. I know first hand that help is often hours away when you are in the woods, and knowing what to do during that time is essential.
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  9. #9
    For no cost to you, you can take a certified state EMT-B class for free in the evenings if you volunteer and join the local fire department EMS or local EMS rescue squad in your community.

    You need to stay in the game to keep your patient assessment skills at their peak.

    Some fire departments also then pay for water rescue and high/low angle rescue classes, which you may be interested in taking. Many states like NY give you a $200 credit (discount) on your state taxes if you are a member of a volunteer fire dept. or rescue squad.

    To stay on top of your game I would suggest taking an EMT-B class in your state and working as a volunteer EMT with your local fire department or part time paid EMT-B in your community. Taking a Wilderness & Emergency Medicine class is nice. Unfortunately, not putting what you learned to use on real patients is not going to be very useful 2 or 3 years after the class.

    Optionally, you may also want to drive ambulances, fire trucks or be an interior fire fighter. Its fun volunteering to climb a ladder with 35 lbs or fire fighting gear with air pack and going into a smoked filled room.

    Link to EMT forum http://www.emtlife.com/

    BTW another option is National Ski Patrol Outdoor Emergency Class (OEC), which runs about 80 hours of training for a very reasonable price of $60. Check out classes in your area on www.nsp.org, which is down right now until 8/17/2009.
    Last edited by catskills; Aug 14, 2009 at 11:18 AM.

  10. #10
    [QUOTE=catskills;449859]For no cost to you, you can take a certified state EMT-B class for free in the evenings if you volunteer and join the local fire department EMS or local EMS rescue squad in your community.

    FYI - The Wilderness First Responder Course covers first aid techniques exclusive for a non-urban environment. You can be a wilderness EMT, but there are definitely differences with some of the techniques VS a standard EMT.

    As for the simple Wilderness First Aid, I would recommend the Advanced Wilderness First Aid because it covers more of the life-threatening treatments.

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