Boot brand recs?

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  1. #1

    Question Boot brand recs?

    Let's say I'm feeling lazy... or crazy... I'm so out of the loop now it isn't funny, too. Which brands/models would be worth looking into for a woman with low-arches? Not sure if it makes a difference, but I also have a tendency to underpronate. Yeah, weird combo.

    I really want to go to a bootfitter. But $$$ is definitely an object. And with Ski Sundown's ski swap coming up, I'm just trying to get an idea if there's anything I could look for just in case I may happen across something good... or a good deal online. Then I could always have good custom footbeds made and all that afterwards... But at least I'd be starting with something better than my beginner boots that don't fit anyway.



    Thoughts? Suggestions? Or at least a direction you could send me? I know you're mostly guys on here but most of you know a lot more about gear than I do right now.
    Last edited by severine; Oct 19, 2007 at 1:56 PM.
    "Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own." ~ Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

  2. #2
    With my limited knowledge and experience I would say the brand doesn't matter as much as the fit. Some manufacturers make boots that are larger in the toe box, others might by tighter here there or everywhere. Even within a manufacturer's priduct line different models might fit better than others. What the hell am I trying to say? Try them on before you buy. Make sure the shell of the boot accommodates your shape foot.

    Now someone can swoop in and give you an informed opinion.
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  3. #3
    I figure "try them on" will be the overwhelming response... but I was hoping for a way to get around it. Of course, it doesn't help when Brian mentions online deals for boots.
    "Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own." ~ Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

  4. #4
    Greg's Avatar
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    Shell Size

    Quote Originally Posted by Grassi21 View Post
    With my limited knowledge and experience I would say the brand doesn't matter as much as the fit. Some manufacturers make boots that are larger in the toe box, others might by tighter here there or everywhere. Even within a manufacturer's priduct line different models might fit better than others. What the hell am I trying to say? Try them on before you buy. Make sure the shell of the boot accommodates your shape foot.

    Now someone can swoop in and give you an informed opinion.
    Be sure to go beyond just trying on the boot. Be sure to shell size it as well. Pull the liner out of the boot and put your foot in the empty shell. Move your foot all the way to the front so your toes are touching the front of the shell. You should then only be able to slip one or two fingers between your heel and the back of the shell. Any more than that is too big. With this approach, you may find the correct sized boot is 1-2 sizes smaller than your street shoe size. Eventually, if you get to a boot fitter with them, the shells can be "made" bigger, but not smaller.

    If/when you find a shell that is appropriate after shell sizing, try the boot on with the liner back in it (bring your ski socks!). Wear the boot for some time and try to identify any potential hot spots. Presumably a used boot will already be packed out a bit so I guess assume the fit is not going to change much without some mods by a boot fitter.

    Ideally, you should see a boot fitter and get in new boots that eventually will pack out to fit your foot, not someone else's. Boots are the one piece of equipment you should not skimp on. I understand the cost concern though so if new boots/boot fitting just can't happen, you may luck out at the ski swap and find something that is better than what you have; hopefully only slightly used.
    I ski double black diamonds.

  5. #5
    hammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by severine View Post
    I figure "try them on" will be the overwhelming response... but I was hoping for a way to get around it. Of course, it doesn't help when Brian mentions online deals for boots.
    Go to the swap and try some boots on...also, make sure you do a shell fit when you try the boots on as well.

    As good as online deals are, I'd stay away from buying boots online unless you have tried on the same model and know that a particular model/size fits you well.

    My wife managed to get a decent pair of novice/intermediate boots at the WaWa ski swap for $60...her previous boots were too big but she liked the fit otherwise, so we found the same brand and similar model in a smaller size. We made sure we did the shell fit when she tried the boots on as well.

    Ultimately, the boots may not last for more than 2-3 years, but for $60 I can't complain...now all I need to do is sell the old boots...

  6. #6
    I should clarify that I'm hoping more to score some last season leftovers (new) at the swap than somebody's old boots. I know a few of the local merchants do bring their leftovers to Sundown every year. But thanks for the tips! I'm sure Brian would keep me on track but it's been so long since I've bought boots that I forgot what to look for.
    "Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own." ~ Paulo Coelho, The Alchemist

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg View Post
    Be sure to go beyond just trying on the boot. Be sure to shell size it as well. Pull the liner out of the boot and put your foot in the empty shell. Move your foot all the way to the front so your toes are touching the front of the shell. You should then only be able to slip one or two fingers between your heel and the back of the shell. Any more than that is too big. With this approach, you may find the correct sized boot is 1-2 sizes smaller than your street shoe size. Eventually, if you get to a boot fitter with them, the shells can be "made" bigger, but not smaller.

    If/when you find a shell that is appropriate after shell sizing, try the boot on with the liner back in it (bring your ski socks!). Wear the boot for some time and try to identify any potential hot spots. Presumably a used boot will already be packed out a bit so I guess assume the fit is not going to change much without some mods by a boot fitter.

    Ideally, you should see a boot fitter and get in new boots that eventually will pack out to fit your foot, not someone else's. Boots are the one piece of equipment you should not skimp on. I understand the cost concern though so if new boots/boot fitting just can't happen, you may luck out at the ski swap and find something that is better than what you have; hopefully only slightly used.
    Greg's advice is good and right on when it comes to self discovery...and there isn't anyone on here that can tell you what models or brands to look at without seeing your naked feet right in front of them in all their glory. Your best bet would be to try and find a shop with a good reputation for fitting and see if they have some of last year's product still around...even though they are on sale any good shop will still work with you on the fitting and at the very least, give you a deal on any fitting...but if you buy something at a swap you are SOL if there are any fit issues and you'll either end up tossing them and starting all over or going into a good fitting shop and paying top dollar by the hour. If you had bought a new, year old boot from me I'd have given you all the service you'd get if you bought the current model...but if you brought in a boot from a swap or another shop you'd be paying witch doctor rates for me to fix them. Seriously, grab the two pair of boots you have...the cheapos and the post preggo too tight pair and go find a good bootfitter...let him/her take a look at what you currently own and see if either pair is worth working on. Good bootfitters aren't going to hose you and try to sell you something brand new if what you have will work...a good fitter knows that establishing a long term relationship is in the best intersts of the shop and customer...sometimes it means foregoing a new purchase today in favor of footbeds and some labor but once we've established that trust and relationship we are confident that we've developed a loyal customer and another happy, qualified referral service.

  8. #8
    hammer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eastcoastpowderhound View Post
    Seriously, grab the two pair of boots you have...the cheapos and the post preggo too tight pair and go find a good bootfitter...let him/her take a look at what you currently own and see if either pair is worth working on.
    Would it be possible to do this first, before the swap? You never know...maybe with a just a bit of tweaking you can still use the boots you already own...

  9. #9
    bvibert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eastcoastpowderhound View Post
    Seriously, grab the two pair of boots you have...the cheapos and the post preggo too tight pair and go find a good bootfitter...
    Just to clear things up, she only has one pair of boots. The cheapies are the post preggo too tight pair.
    Brian

  10. #10
    hammer's Avatar
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    It's a shame you folks aren't closer to Concord, NH...

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