Stowe/Mt. Mansfield, VT 4/25/2009

AlpineZone

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1

    Camera Stowe/Mt. Mansfield, VT 4/25/2009

    Date(s) Skied: April 25th, 2009

    Resort or Ski Area: Stowe, VT

    Conditions: ~80 F in the early afternoon at the Midway Lodge (~1,700'), 60s F in the Mt. Mansfield alpine (~4,000'+), ripe corn snow below ~3,600' with some sloppy snow above that elevation due to recent snowfall.

    Trip Report: The boys were more interested in planting flowers with Mom on Saturday than skiing, so unfortunately I couldn’t interest them in going out for some turns. This meant that I was on a solo outing, but the upside was that I’d be able to do a much bigger tour than I would have been able to with Ty, or especially with Dylan. The skies were clear and blue all Saturday morning on what was likely our warmest day of the spring up to that point. The temperature was already around 80 F when I pulled into Stowe’s Midway lot (~1,700’) in the early afternoon, and with the forecast for temperatures in that range, I hadn’t been too optimistic about the snow quality. My major goal was to at least get in a good workout, so I was willing to negotiate some sloppy snow on the descent if that was the way it had to be.

    Snow was available right from the Midway Lodge elevation, with just a couple hundred feet of fairly flat walking on grass to get on it from the parking lot. I was immediately surprised when I got on the snow and found that it wasn’t sloppy at all; it was all corn with just the top inch or so loosened up. That’s the sort of corn that seems to provide some of the easiest turns, so I was immediately enthusiastic about the potential for a quality descent. There wasn’t much of a breeze in the lower elevations, but the snow helped keep the air temperature a bit cooler and the ascent was very enjoyable. For ascent attire I’d gone about as minimally as I felt comfortable doing, with a short sleeve polypropylene T-shirt and my ski pants with the side zippers fully open, and that worked out to be a comfortable setup for the temperature. I hadn’t made a non-powder ascent on skins in a while, and I was quickly reminded how the lightness of Telemark gear allows you to simply fly up the slopes. Before I knew it I was up at the Cliff House (3,625’) and feeling great, so I decided to keep going up into the alpine.



    I set my skis onto my pack and hit the climbing gully. There was a bit of rotten snow in spots, and as I didn’t immediately find a boot ladder, I had visions of an inefficient, sloppy climb with lots of post-holing. I’d already post-holed a few times in the outskirts of the gully (it only took one of those to remind me to get my ski pants zipped up at least halfway) but fortunately, about 50 feet up the climbing gully I found a boot ladder made by some nice big feet. That made the going fairly smooth, and the views of the Green and White Mountains continued to improve with each step. Near the top of the gully, I ran into a guy about to descend. He had spent an overnight or two on the mountain, and said that he’d been amazed to find fresh powder on Friday morning when he’d started skiing. It sounds like along with Thursday morning, Friday morning had also been good in the higher elevations with regard to fresh snow. The downside of the fresh snow was that conditions in the alpine were still a bit sloppy. The new snow had not yet cycled to corn in the highest elevations, so it just wasn’t going to provide an optimal surface. By the time I departed from my conversation in the gully, I was moments from the Mansfield ridge line. Up on the ridge I enjoyed the new westerly views of the Champlain Valley and Adirondacks, and decided to stop in at the top of the Chin (4,395’) since I was so close. There was a small group of college students enjoying the popular leeward side of the summit, and there was a pleasant breeze of probably 15 MPH or so. The high temperature for the day at the Mt. Mansfield stake came in at 67 F, so I suspect that the summit maximum temperature was probably close to that. Getting an April day like that at the top of the Chin is certainly a treat.







    For my descent, I wasn’t able to ski right in the summit or the West Chin area due to lack of snow, but I was able to ski down the gully where the Long Trail drops away from the Chin as it heads south. It was quite a perspective to see the snow create a flat surface through the gully, when in the off season it’s a 10-foot deep chasm containing the hiking trail. I had to remove my skis to descend the very top of the climbing gully, but below that point one could keep them on continuously. As expected, the new snow up high that hadn’t fully cycled to corn wasn’t as nice as the corn snow on the bottom 2,000’, but I actually had some fun turns in the climbing gully, and it let me work on Telemark turns in steeper, tighter confines. I still had to make some alpine turns and throw in some side slipping up there since some areas were just so tight, but overall the gully allowed a good mix of styles. The crème de la crème of snow surfaces for the day was probably the top half of the Gondolier descent. There must have been very little traffic up there because most of the snow surface was just a smooth layer of ripe corn. The lower half of Gondolier still had nice corn snow, but the surface wasn’t as smooth as the top half of trail. Perhaps the lower elevations had experienced more melting that started forming aberrations in the surface. Based on my GPS data, it looks like my descent was 2,720’, not quite what you can get for vertical in the winter when you head all the way back down to Route 108, but still a decent run. There were still about 7 feet of snow at the stake on Saturday, and even though that level has dropped some with the recent warmth we’ve had, skiing should available on Mt. Mansfield for a while.









    J.Spin

  2. #2
    NIce TR there Jspin! TR's have now been taken to a new technological level!
    '07--08 season: 51 Days, '08-'09 season: 55 Days, '09-'10 season: 41 Days, '10-'11 season: 49 days, '11-'12 season: 40 Days '12-'13 season: 57 days, '13-'14 season, 60 days '14-'15 season 60 days, '15-'16 season 52 days, '16-'17 season: 50 days '07-'17 seasons: 515 Days

    '17 - '18 Season:
    November: 12,18,19,24,26 (Mount Snow)
    December: 2,3,10 (Mount Snow) 9 (Stratton)

  3. #3

  4. #4
    thetrailboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    NEK by Birth; Alta/Snowbird by Choice
    Posts
    26,345
    Items for Sale
    Wow, amazing TR. That puts mine to shame....

    Always a pleasure to read your reports. If you and the family are ever skiing at SB, let me know. Would love to take a few runs.
    Live, Ski, or Die!


  5. #5
    Cool Data! Gets me thinking....

  6. #6
    TheBEast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Too far south, MA
    Posts
    1,574
    Very nice report!

    What kind of GPS unit do you have?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by drjeff View Post
    NIce TR there Jspin! TR's have now been taken to a new technological level!
    +1 Awesome.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBEast View Post
    Very nice report!

    What kind of GPS unit do you have?
    Really, that's pretty neat.

  8. #8
    Always loved your TR and pics. This def. takes it to a new level. Good stuff man.
    '04-'05 - 2 days
    '05-'06 - 11 days
    '06-'07 - 20 days
    '07-'08 - 19 days
    '08 - '09 - 23 days
    '09 - '10 - 16 days
    '10 - '11 - 12 days
    '11 - '12 - 6 days
    Lifetime Total - 109

    Namaste you guys!

  9. #9
    Not a big TR poster and now never will be

    Great report!!!!

  10. #10
    very cool. way to get some.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:00 AM.