Skis for a beginner

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  1. #1

    Skis for a beginner

    Hello. I am a beginner skiier, and I am looking to purchase new skis so that I can stop wasting money on rentals. I have skiied for a few years, but I am not all that comfortable since I only ski a few times each year (pretty much stay on greens). I used to use my sister's skis but I think since they don't fit very well, they may be adding to my fear of going too fast or being out of control. I am a 5'3" female, weighing about 120-125. I have found a few "decent" options online, but I am not sure if they are right for me or my ability. I have been told to look for something between 150 and 160, probably on the lower end would be better. Here is a little of what I found (I'm looking for used or cheaper skis):



    Used Salomon MLX 150 (quite a few years old)
    New Dynastar Omedrive Downhill Skis 154 cm (2004 model)
    New Nordica N7.1W Carving Skis 150 cm (2004 model)
    New Atomic e3 Carving Skis 150 cm (2004 model)
    I've also seen some Rossignol 10.4 and 10.6 cut skis, I think 160's

    Any other ideas? Do any of these sound good for a beginner my size? Are some brands just not worth the money? I've heard Rossi's are the best. Which should I look for and which should I avoid? If I buy without bindings, anyone have suggestions on bindings or DIN level? Thank you very much for your help!!!

  2. #2
    bvibert's Avatar
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    Being a beginner level I doubt you would notice much difference in any ski. If it were me I would just go to a ski shop and get what ever beginner/intermediate ski package they have that fits your budget.

    Either way let a qualified shop adjust your bindings.
    Brian

  3. #3
    most shops will have a great beginner package (skis, bindings, poles) pick that up, make some progress, have fun....
    updownupdownupdownupdown

  4. #4
    definitely recommend a beginner package at your local shop. do you already have boots and poles? regardless, you don't want to buy a ski that is 'too much for you', i.e. not intended for a beginner. these types of skis will hold you back and punish you if you don't have good technique yet. i would not recommend shopping online for beginner skis unless you know exactly what you are looking for. i am not familiar with beginner lines and can't help you, but a ski shop can.
    -Steve
    TheSnowWay.com "Skiing is not a sport, it is a way of life." - Otto Schniebs

  5. #5
    Z .... you may want to see if any of those beginner ski package has anything "women specific." I've seen K2 First Loves in a package before. My wife bought a pair of Fischer Vision vi20's last year in a package as well.

    I don't claim to know much about gear, but I'm soaking in what I can. I believe women specific skis have, amoungst other things, their binding mounted a bit closer to the tips of the skis to compensate for a woman's different center of gravity.

    Steve, am I right on this one?

    edit: I did a little research for you. Click Here For the Whole Article

    By contrast, ski engineers do all kinds of math problems based on weight distribution to figure out where the bindings should be placed on a women-specific ski. Ski manufacturers have generally found that women's bindings should be about two centimeters farther up than men's, and women's skis reflect this with a forward binding mark. Proportionally speaking, men tend to have more weight around their shoulders; therefore they shift weight with the upper body. Women's concentration of mass tends to be lower, around the hips. They rely more on the lower body to initiate weight transfer. On skis women's weight is concentrated more toward the tail. In ski instructor lingo, this puts women "in the backseat." Moving the binding up a little compensates for that.
    ~Rich~

  6. #6
    Thanks for your suggestions. I went to a ski store a few weeks ago, and they didn't have any beginner packages in my price range at the time (I'm a poor graduate student!), but I appreciate your suggestions. I'll keep looking and maybe rent until I see some end of the season sales on the right package. I do not have poles or boots yet either.

    Does anyone have suggestions on what I should look for at the store? Are ski shops usually honest about finding the right ski for you or just selling you what they have?

    Thanks again!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by z-trio
    I'll keep looking and maybe rent until I see some end of the season sales on the right package. I do not have poles or boots yet either.

    Does anyone have suggestions on what I should look for at the store? Are ski shops usually honest about finding the right ski for you or just selling you what they have?

    Thanks again!
    Check the edit I made above, z-trio...a little bit information for you. Waiting for the season isn't a bad idea. Make sure you don't settle for just anything when it comes to boots. Getting a good pair boots that fit you well is important.

    As far as the motives of shops go ...... your better off talking to people in your area and finding out which shops will work with you and not give you the "hard sell" If your in the Northeast, someone here will be able to recommend a good shop.

    Good Luck
    Welcome to the forum
    Post often
    and .... don't forget to keep us posted on your purchase!
    ~Rich~

  8. #8
    Thanks for the research! That's very interesting, particularly since I've never used skis that were fixed just for me...just borrowed or rented skis. And, I've never actually enjoyed skiing that much because I am always a little afraid. The boots I borrow from my sister are definitely too big so I move my foot and nothing happens in terms of turning. So I really appreciate your help and look forward to getting good gear for me.

    In terms of shops, I am in the Northeast. I'm in Portsmouth, NH. I've gone to Golf and Ski Warehouse and really liked the man who helped me, but they just didn't have anything at the time I could afford. Since it's not "my sport," I don't want to make a huge investment. I only ski a few times each year, but I hate the waste of money and time getting rentals.

    Thanks again.

  9. #9
    Sky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by z-trio
    Are ski shops usually honest about finding the right ski for you or just selling you what they have?
    Great question. At some point and at most shops....someone is bound to offer you what they have left. But as folks above have stated...as long as it's not a performance ski, as long as it's your length...you should be OK.

    Check out the web pages for the specific brands.

    Atomicsnow.com, Volkl.com (considering the Attiva line for my wife actually). Just bought my daughter Fischer RX4s (last year's ski came with a binding, got it @ Wachusett). Not a women's specific ski, but low-level enough and with enough "shape" etc to make a vast improvement over her "junior" skis (little kid's skis).

    Anyway...think of all the different brands and check their web sites. They all offer women specific skis. Once you get familiar with the specific "lines" for women, you'll be more confident/informed as you shop around.

    Good luck and keep us posted!

  10. #10

    Re: Skis for a beginner

    Quote Originally Posted by z-trio
    Here is a little of what I found (I'm looking for used or cheaper skis):

    Used Salomon MLX 150 (quite a few years old)
    New Dynastar Omedrive Downhill Skis 154 cm (2004 model)
    New Nordica N7.1W Carving Skis 150 cm (2004 model)
    New Atomic e3 Carving Skis 150 cm (2004 model)
    I've also seen some Rossignol 10.4 and 10.6 cut skis, I think 160's
    I recently bought the Dynastar Omedrive 154cm online, probably even from the same ebay seller you're checking. The skis have been great so far. Simply fantastic. I've skied for 8 years but only started skiing a lot last winter.

    I also bought some Fischer bindings online. The skis cost about $100 with shipping, the bindings about $60 with shipping, and mounting at a local Ski Market was $40. Total: $200 for skis and bindings. I had shopped around for a long time but couldn't find a better deal than this. Sometimes stores would have a $199 ski deal but the skis were usually not my size.

    Being also a poor grad student, I wouldn't have been able to afford my own skis without buying stuff online. I bought my boots in person though--there's no other way.

    BTW, I'm 5'6" and 128 lbs, and the 154cm skis have worked well so far.

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