9% Tax Proposal on NH lift tickts - Page 9

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  1. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdfreetuna View Post
    You highlighted, roughly: "I don't believe government should be involved in education at all."

    Crazy talk? That's a pretty mainstream opinion, and certainly the prevailing view among those who choose alternatives to public education.
    Government is fully involved in K-12 education. Your "main stream" opinion is the government should NOT?



    Makes me wonder what "stream" you're swimming at.

  2. #82
    thetrailboss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Killingtime View Post
    Oh Yay, more money added to the cost of this sport.


    https://www.conwaydailysun.com/news/...982efef7e.html

    https://unofficialnetworks.com/2019/...ticket-tax-nh/

    CONCORD Lawmakers are expected to consider a bill next year that would tax ski lift tickets at the same rate as the rooms and meals tax in New Hampshire.

    As expected, a ski industry official said they are preparing to oppose it.

    State Rep. Craig Thompson (D-Harrisville), said he is floating the idea as a way to create a scholarship program for New Hampshire students to attend in-state colleges and universities. Revenue would help middle-income and lower-income students, he said.
    They must have gotten the idea from Vermont....
    Live, Ski, or Die!


  3. #83
    LOL. Perhaps the good people of NJ should build a wall to keep out these evil leftists from New York who are taxing their guns and bibles to send poor people to colleges they don't need because it's better to live in ignorance when your life is serving burgers and fries to some preferred demographic at a Turnpike rest area. I'm pretty sure the war on the modern welfare state was lost in American in 1935. I think the war on higher education can still be won as it becomes easier and easier to learn the fundamentals of accounting and other useful disciplines by watching videos on youtube.

  4. #84
    Quote Originally Posted by abc View Post
    Government is fully involved in K-12 education. Your "main stream" opinion is the government should NOT?

    Makes me wonder what "stream" you're swimming at.
    You never heard eliminating DOE proposed?

    Basic politics lesson: Some people prefer a more expansive role for the government, others prefer a more limited role of the government.

    "Get the government out of education" is a common sentiment with libertarians and conservatives. Go out and meet some of these folks and get exposed to different ideas!

  5. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by bdfreetuna View Post
    "Get the government out of education" is a common sentiment with libertarians and conservatives.
    Not the libertarians I hang out with!

    The government wasn't involved in education if you go back a couple centuries. That must be a happier time!

    (there're still a lot of countries where the government don't bother with education, most of them in Africa, I think)

    One thing we very much know. Uneducated population is a lot easier to govern.

    Wonder which leftist government shot themselves in the foot, way back when...

  6. #86
    The idea behind getting the government out of school is that it would improve education.

    Public schools have largely failed, yet we continue to defend them as a sacred institution. I'm sure you're well aware that USA ranks below 20-30 countries on quality of education. Why shouldn't we be #1 or at least right up there? It's pretty easy to discern where the problem lies.

    I'm not sure if public schools should be completely eliminated, but it's just a fact that those who attend private schools, religious schools, charter schools, technical schools, or home schooled surpass the public school students in every metric.

    So why would I support the least successful schools that put a tax burden on the entire nation?

    What I do support is vouchers or other programs for low income kids to attend a quality school. And a tax cut which corresponds to the newly-eliminated public expenses.

  7. #87
    JimG.'s Avatar
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    I went to a private high school. Shortly after I graduated I decided if I had children they would attend public schools. Private schools are for folks who want to learn and socialize with others who are exactly like them. We prefer diversity of all sorts in this family and firmly believe it is best to live and let live. That does not mean we approve or agree with everything such an environment fosters, but we can agree to disagree. That's called reality.

    All of my boys graduated/will graduate from a public high school. We moved to this school district for the public education opportunities. We have lived here 17 years and the school budget has never been defeated at the ballot box. I am happy to pay my local and school taxes because this school district is excellent. There are some great private and parochial schools nearby, and many attend those schools which is also fine with me.

    I do not believe that government should stay out of education; schooling is necessary and frankly without some kind of outside supervision many would just skip school altogether. If you live in a community it is your duty to support the school system even if you decide to pay for a private school on your own. That's civics 101.

  8. #88

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    Majority of those countries rank above the US have "government involved" education systems!

    Talk about throwing the babe out with the bath water.

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by JimG. View Post
    Private schools are for folks who want to learn and socialize with others who are exactly like them.
    Interesting. My experience was the opposite -- we had kids from probably 30 different countries at the school, every corner of the world practically. There was more "diversity" in any way I can think of compared to the public school. The only non-diverse commonality would be that everyone attending had parents who could afford the tuition or get scholarships.

    I am considering sending my daughter a historically black private school (because it's nearby and meets our requirements). We are not a black family (not that skin color is real diversity anyway). These things really depend on the circumstances.

  10. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimG. View Post
    All of my boys graduated/will graduate from a public high school. We moved to this school district for the public education opportunities. We have lived here 17 years and the school budget has never been defeated at the ballot box. I am happy to pay my local and school taxes because this school district is excellent. There are some great private and parochial schools nearby, and many attend those schools which is also fine with me.
    The US (public) education system is somewhat unique in that it's strictly based on your home address. That led to the coupling of house price to the quality of schools. There're plenty of very good public schools, mostly in affluent neighborhoods. The "national average" is dragged down by the poorly run schools, typically in poor neighborhood. Basically, an economical divide.

    I grew up in a different country. My school years coincide with a period of "experiment" to strictly enforce address to school choice. The result was pretty disappointing. Eventually, the policy was abandoned. And students are allow to cross district boundary if they don't mind the longer travel time, with better result.

    As a victim of that policy, my school days were largely spent doing my own study while the teacher tried to ram the basic knowledge into the few slowest students, many of whom refuse to learn. So I can't say the quality of schools I attended was brilliant. I succeeded IN SPITE of the school, mostly because my parents instilled in me that "knowledge is power". It's never been truer in today's highly technologically advanced world we live in. That, being the element missing, which contributes more to the poor education system than whether government is involved or not.
    Last edited by abc; Nov 6, 2019 at 1:18 PM.

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