Winter time what hills will AZ people go to this season - Page 6

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  1. #51
    As long as only one parent is on the chairlift at a time, it's legit. Get one of those clear plastic pass holders so you aren't zip-tying your pass to your jacket.

    One problem with RFID unfortunately is that some mountains will identify you by name, and may question a Steve that looks like a Jennifer. Then again, maybe not in this day and age. Both parents can always dye their hair purple to avoid that line of questioning.



    Anyway, curious which mountains offer a "2 parents / 1 at a time pass". Probably irrelevant unless one wants to pay $149 window rate.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by bdfreetuna View Post
    As long as only one parent is on the chairlift at a time, it's legit.
    You can believe that if you want, but that's not actually the case unless a resort specifically allows it. Most passes/tickets clearly say "non-transferable" on them or when you purchase them. If you buy a non-transferable pass, it is not "legit" to share it between parents even if only one is on a chairlift at a time. Can they prosecute you if they catch you? Technically yes, but most likely they wouldn't. I'd think worst case they would revoke the pass and warn you not to do it again. Now if you were caught and warned once by a resort that didn't allow it and then did it again anyway, then all bets are off.

  3. #53
    Natural Law > US Constitution > Contracts & Treaties > Legislation > Local Ordinances > Common Sense > Fine Print on Back of Lift Tickets

    That's how I look at it anyway. Like other have said it wouldn't even cross many people's minds that it would be a "violation" in any way at all. You pay for 1 day of lift access for one person, pretty simple. I think if a mountain were to "prosecute" someone for sharing a ticket while the other sits in the lodge or using other resort services/meals, it probably wouldn't go anywhere legally.

    If it did become a major case somehow, I wouldn't put it past a ruling that banning lift ticket one-at-a-time sharing is an illegal practice that screws the consumer with no good cause.

    Edit: The reason I say it's "legit", is because it's clearly not stealing. On the contrary, the mountain that insists you need to buy 2 tickets for only 1 person to be skiing all day is the one doing the stealing.
    Last edited by bdfreetuna; Nov 13, 2019 at 2:30 PM.

  4. #54
    Wouldn't this be similar to letting someone use my season pass on a day where I wasn't skiing or even in the same state as the mountain in question?

    These mountains do not want to be robbed of the "opportunity" to sell that extra day pass, or thats how it was explained to me when my cousin let his college buddy use his pass and got caught red handed when they looked that the picture on the scan gun.

    I also believe some resorts give bonuses to the scanners who turn them in as well.

  5. #55
    Not similar to handing out your Seasons Pass on days you're not using it. That actually does rob the ski area, as your seasons pass does not entitle you to ski every day out of a full season, it only entitles you to ski every day you can actually show up yourself.

    In the case of two parents sharing a ticket, each one is using a full day pass to ski approximately half a day each. The mountain suffers no loss except from a perspective of greed and taking advantage of customers.

    The best solution is for all mountains to offer parent-share tickets at the same price as regular tickets, and with the same available discounts, so they won't suffer any hassles or confusion. Everybody wins.

  6. #56

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    Tuna, are you a lawyer? I'm not. But I find your argument unconvincing.

    "it only entitles you to ski every HOUR (or MINUTE) you can actually show up yourself".

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by abc View Post
    Point being, ski area have the freedom to offer discount to whoever and whenever. It's a business. It can choose to offer discount to attract ANY underrepresented demographic to boost business!

    New parents are just one such demographics. They don't have as much time. They're probably feeling a bit of financial pinch. So if a mountain choose to make it extra appealing to ski for them to ski in THAT mountain, they're free to do so!

    It's pretty obvious with the other discounts as well.

    If it's good for business, other mountain will follow (especially if it's publicized in social media or ski magazines). But any mountain is free to NOT follow suite if they feel it's not worth the hassle. Example, Vail resort does NOT offer a senior discount on the Epic Pass!
    I agree and my wife and I abided by Mt. Snow's/Peak's rules and did not share our season pass.
    Offering some type of pass for new parents is good business sense.
    Just like offering discounts for young adults and seniors. Especially the young adult passes - you get them into the sport on the cheap when they don't have much money and then in theory in their 30's when they have a family and money, everyone is into it and spending their money on the sport, at the resort, etc.
    And a lot of times, if there wasn't a discount, that person is going to go elsewhere or not at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by bdfreetuna View Post
    Not similar to handing out your Seasons Pass on days you're not using it. That actually does rob the ski area, as your seasons pass does not entitle you to ski every day out of a full season, it only entitles you to ski every day you can actually show up yourself.

    In the case of two parents sharing a ticket, each one is using a full day pass to ski approximately half a day each. The mountain suffers no loss except from a perspective of greed and taking advantage of customers.

    The best solution is for all mountains to offer parent-share tickets at the same price as regular tickets, and with the same available discounts, so they won't suffer any hassles or confusion. Everybody wins.
    Exactly.
    Parents with a newborn both trying to ski/ride are not trying to screw over the mountain... they're trying to enjoy doing what they love and involving their family... which will often times translate into said child(ren) becoming a future customer. It is just good business sense/practice.

    Quote Originally Posted by abc View Post
    Tuna, are you a lawyer? I'm not. But I find your argument unconvincing.

    "it only entitles you to ski every HOUR (or MINUTE) you can actually show up yourself".
    I'm no lawyer, I forget if tuna is, I know we have some on here.
    But, I'm like 99.99% sure that whatever they put in the fine print goes basically.
    Just like you sign away your liability.
    However, there is always extenuating circumstances.

    For a pass, in court, I'm guessing you would have no leg to stand on, just like you can't have 2 people use the same ticket for a sporting event, concert, etc.

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by bdfreetuna View Post
    In the case of two parents sharing a ticket, each one is using a full day pass to ski approximately half a day each. The mountain suffers no loss except from a perspective of greed and taking advantage of customers.

    The best solution is for all mountains to offer parent-share tickets at the same price as regular tickets, and with the same available discounts, so they won't suffer any hassles or confusion. Everybody wins.
    On the contrary of not suffering a loss, the mountains that offer "infant care tickets" or whatever-its-called, actually bring in some revenue versus bringing in $0.00. As such, I'm somewhat surprised this is not as standard a practice as offering Senior lift tickets.
    President - Bicknell's Thrush Extermination Solutions (BTES), LLC



  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by abc View Post
    Tuna, are you a lawyer? I'm not. But I find your argument unconvincing.

    "it only entitles you to ski every HOUR (or MINUTE) you can actually show up yourself".
    Nope but I never heard of anyone thinking parents sharing tickets for sake of watching the kid was a bad thing until 30 minutes ago; that said I'm perfectly comfy with my position, and perfectly comfy if others disagree or weigh the issue differently.

    My kid is only 2 so it won't be long before I look for "friendly" mountains, so to speak. I'm not looking to blatantly violate policies, but "unfriendly" mountains will lose my business. May do a little on location research this winter.

  10. #60
    Quote Originally Posted by Jcb890 View Post
    I agree and my wife and I abided by Mt. Snow's/Peak's rules and did not share our season pass.
    Offering some type of pass for new parents is good business sense.
    While I dont disagree with your second sentence, the spirit of what I'm talking about doesn't extend out as well to season passes. If you've purchased a season pass you've already made the commitment & thus presumed acknowledgement that you somehow are in fact able to ski a LOT of days, even though you have a baby (maybe grandparents live nearby?).

    The reason I think this makes much more sense for single day tickets, is that for parents buying these, it is likely literally the only way they'll be able to enjoy even a handful of days skiing per season while taking care of a newborn.
    President - Bicknell's Thrush Extermination Solutions (BTES), LLC



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