SOLO - Wilderness First Responder Review - Page 2

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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by catskills View Post
    For no cost to you, you can take a certified state EMT-B class for free in the evenings if you volunteer and join the local fire department EMS or local EMS rescue squad in your community.
    Quote Originally Posted by Connecticut View Post
    FYI - The Wilderness First Responder Course covers first aid techniques exclusive for a non-urban environment. You can be a wilderness EMT, but there are definitely differences with some of the techniques VS a standard EMT.



    As for the simple Wilderness First Aid, I would recommend the Advanced Wilderness First Aid because it covers more of the life-threatening treatments.
    Connecticut - As a NY State EMT-B volunteer with local Fire Department and member of NSP trained in OEC I understand the differences between urban and outdoor wilderness first aid. Your right there is a difference. That said, in many situations the patent assessment and patient care is the same in both urban and non-urban environments.

  2. #12
    nice sounds like an awesome trip!!!! remember to stay safe in the woods.I try to have a safety meeting often,,

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by catskills View Post
    For no cost to you, you can take a certified state EMT-B class for free in the evenings if you volunteer and join the local fire department EMS or local EMS rescue squad in your community.

    BTW another option is National Ski Patrol Outdoor Emergency Class (OEC), which runs about 80 hours of training for a very reasonable price of $60. Check out classes in your area on www.nsp.org, which is down right now until 8/17/2009.
    Thanks for publicizing the options. In my case, I've made the very deliberate choice to enroll in a 2-day WFA, after experienceing a rescue first-hand. Unfortunately, my life's position has consumed most available hours and vacation days; I am at the wrong point in my life to make commitments to rescue squads or SAR teams.

    I am certain that what I can learn in two days will be of sufficient value for a 2-day commitment and that it can and will be useful.
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  4. #14
    [QUOTE=Connecticut;450122]
    Quote Originally Posted by catskills View Post
    As for the simple Wilderness First Aid, I would recommend the Advanced Wilderness First Aid because it covers more of the life-threatening treatments.
    I wholeheartedly agree that AWFA is a sound investment.

    I have elected to break my training into two pieces, since my life's commitments with family and work consume most of my life and vacation time, which is why most of my hiking is relegated to day trips. There is no way I can take four contiguous days away. The Hulbert Center has a practicable approach, breaking AWFA into two 2-day weekend pieces.

    It's my understanding that Advanced provides more in-depth on each topic, more hands-on improvisational practice and more leadership. In talking with the leaders, I did not get the impression that additional life-threatening injuries were covered.

    I would also have to disagree with "catskills" on his or her comment, "Unfortunately, not putting what you learned to use on real patients is not going to be very useful 2 or 3 years after the class." Being aware of the issues, what to do, what not to do, can still be greatly useful, even though you are not crafted at it. This I saw first hand as various people came to assist. Some had no idea, some knew that I should not continue walking, knowing when to call for help, when to wait, are crucial. I think your comment is appropriate at an EMT level of service, which I do not aspire to.

    I hope I'm never in a position to need to dispense anything. But nothing would be worse than being in an incident and not having any clue. With that thought, I'm off to class in November....
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  5. #15
    I was a volunteer EMT for many years. It's very rewarding. I'm no longer certified, but it's like to do ems again, I just don't have the time.

  6. #16
    I'm just back from WFA class. I loved it. In fact, I don't feel real confident, now that I know what I don't know. I'm now motivated to go on to advanced to get into more detail. However,after living through a rescue, there are a huge number of learnings. I am confident that if I REMEMBER everything, I'll be fine. So with that in mind, a quick checklist goes into my pack, along with certain things I might not have before considered.

    Having seen first hand the process: first, second assessment, plan, etc. is a methodology that can be applied anytime, years later. I'm not medically trained, and I don't consider Red Cross courses to be training for wilderness experience, so most everything except bandaging was new to me.

    16 hours over 2 days is long, but it is so chock-packed with info, tests and drills that it's going to take a lot of time to internalize it. The war stories during breaks and lunch were invaluable. Good news is that I have other hikers to bounce it off of. Yeah, it was quite a sacrifice of a beautiful weekend, but it's an investment I'll have forever.

    Do it.
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  7. #17
    I would recommend with each renewal taking the next level up. In other words WFA to AWFA to WFR to WEMT. This will not only keep your skills up, but it will also provide enough challenge to stay engaged.

    Safe Hiking.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Connecticut View Post
    I would recommend with each renewal taking the next level up. In other words WFA to AWFA to WFR to WEMT. This will not only keep your skills up, but it will also provide enough challenge to stay engaged.

    Safe Hiking.
    The plan is to advance to AWFA. Problem with WFR and EMT is that there is no time in my life for that much away time and the remainder of my obligations
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Connecticut View Post
    I would recommend with each renewal taking the next level up. In other words WFA to AWFA to WFR to WEMT. This will not only keep your skills up, but it will also provide enough challenge to stay engaged.

    Safe Hiking.
    AFA is rarely offered any more. Even though I'd like to see it. Right from SOLO's mouth. I'm not in a position to devote five days to WFR.
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  10. #20
    Bump

    Did WFA refresher in Lowell MA last weekend. Felt more like a AWFA or WFR course this time. I went once before, (this time as a refresher) but this was way better. Definite Brain Overload, but enough info to last a lifetime. Everyone should do this one.

    There is another one slated for REI Reading, Mass in January.
    http://www.rei.com/event/32704/session/40870

    Wilderness First Aid at REI Reading
    Begins: 1/21/2012 9:00 a.m.
    Event Location: REI Reading
    Event Fee: See event details
    Ends: 1/22/2012 6:00 p.m. (EST)
    Instructor: WMI & REI Instructors
    Description: REI is collaborating with the Wilderness Medicine Institute of NOLS to offer a comprehensive two day course that will teach you the wilderness medicine skills you need to recreate with confidence in the backcountry. From the Patient Assessment System through traumatic, medical, and environmental emergencies, you'll experience a wide variety of topics designed to prepare you to act if an accident occurs. This is a 16 hour course over two days. The course begins at 9am each day and runs through 6pm, with an one hour break midday. Minimum age is 16 years old. You will have both in store classroom time and hands on practice scenarios. Practice scenarios may take place outside in various weather conditions; be prepared for inclement weather. No prerequisites required. Successful completion results in a Wilderness Medicine Institute of NOLS Wilderness First Aid certification. This course may be used to recertify Wilderness First Responder, Wilderness Advanced First Aid and Wilderness EMT (wilderness portion only) certifications if you hold a current/in grace year WMI certification. Participants using the WFA to recertify their WFR need to pass both a written and a practical test.
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

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