hiking in flip flops? - Page 2

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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by dmc View Post
    You don't have to apologize for your opinion...
    I didn't?

    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by billski View Post
    I didn't?
    No you didn't...
    "Sometimes the rock n roll life is not all rainbows & fairy dust..." - Fake Jerry

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by dmc View Post
    No you didn't...


    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Warp Daddy View Post
    on easier stuff i'll wear my Keens
    I'm thinking about replace my 10 year old Tevas... How do you like Keens? Get any nasty looks on the trail?
    "Sometimes the rock n roll life is not all rainbows & fairy dust..." - Fake Jerry

  5. #15
    thetrailboss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmc View Post
    I'm thinking about replace my 10 year old Tevas... How do you like Keens? Get any nasty looks on the trail?
    I don't think it is a matter of "opinion" or "nasty looks," but one of common sense and safety. I've seen folks hike barefoot before. Folks can hike in whatever they want and I don't care until someone has to risk their life to go rescue them because they rolled an ankle or injured themselves.
    Live, Ski, or Die!


  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by thetrailboss View Post
    I don't think it is a matter of "opinion" or "nasty looks," but one of common sense and safety. I've seen folks hike barefoot before. Folks can hike in whatever they want and I don't care until someone has to risk their life to go rescue them because they rolled an ankle or injured themselves.
    Maybe so and maybe not... Some terrain sure - hike in Tevas.. Some tough terrain - wear your boots... Maybe even consider breaking out the double boots for those really crazy hikes..

    People hike the Tuckerman trail in sneakers all the time.. I've even seen Tevas. I've never seen a Ranger stop someone for that. I'm sure they can handle a "rolled" ankle... I've seen them handle worse..

    It's always black and white with you guys when it comes to your opinions... .

    just my opinion...
    "Sometimes the rock n roll life is not all rainbows & fairy dust..." - Fake Jerry

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by dmc View Post
    It's always black and white with you guys when it comes to your opinions... .

    just my opinion...
    Agree. It all depends on the application for sure. When I'm out bushwacking, I want something with full protection. Then again, a "suburban" trail, or even hiking on volcanic rocks, sneakers are just fine. Not so sure I'd want to be in Tevas when I hit the muck or mid-trail moose droppings!

    The last thing I worry about is how I look when I'm hiking. I don't think the wildlife care what I wear either.
    Sent from my TACPOD (Tactical Airborne Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Pod) using Satellite TADIL J Alternate Gateway Controller (Alternate STGC) via Blackjack

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by billski View Post
    Agree. It all depends on the application for sure. When I'm out bushwacking, I want something with full protection. Then again, a "suburban" trail, or even hiking on volcanic rocks, sneakers are just fine. Not so sure I'd want to be in Tevas when I hit the muck or mid-trail moose droppings!
    If it's muddy I don't wear Tevas... I got a pair of footwear for every occasion...
    "Sometimes the rock n roll life is not all rainbows & fairy dust..." - Fake Jerry

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by severine View Post
    I've hiked in Tevas, but that was a long time ago. I suppose if you want to go archaeological, it's probably better for you because feet weren't designed to be contained in shoes anyway. And there is a movement now for barefoot running. On the other hand, how do you get a good footing/grip on the rockier stuff?
    I've often found that I get better grip on wet rocks with barefeet than I do with shoes. Spent a lot of time scrambling over rocks in VT swimming holes during the summer as a kid. Always felt safer barefoot.


    Quote Originally Posted by thetrailboss View Post
    To be honest, if we are talking about a hike up a 4,000 footer, and I am carrying even a daypack, I always reach for my Asolo 520 full hiking boots. Sneakers or "low cut" approach shoes are still not a good idea because of the lack of ankle support.
    I really don't hike much at all these days, but I did constantly in High School. I've rolled my ankles way worse in full on hiking boots than I have in 'low cut' shoes. I find with a full up boot, if you start to roll over you go all the way, where as with a lower cuff you're able to flex a bit more.

    I pretty much just trail run these days a couple of times a month on the Big A. Wear my normal running shoes. I think the keys to not rolling an ankle are staying light on ones feet and trying to stay up on the balls of your feet even going downhill.

    The barefoot running movement makes a lot of sense to me. I don't see why it wouldn't translate to hiking just the same.

  10. #20
    Open toe is not a good idea when hiking any where there is exposed rock, root, or other such potentially painful and injury causing topographical features. Keen and Teva make "open" hiking shoes with closed/ruberized toe. If you want to have open feet without socks, that would be the way to go.

    Quote Originally Posted by thetrailboss View Post
    "low cut" approach shoes are still not a good idea because of the lack of ankle support.
    I have hiked with low cut hiking shoes for as long as I have been hiking and have had no issues. Plenty of support. Even for lugging ski gear up to Tucks. This is all personal preference based on individual physiology. Lack of ankle support is not an issue for many hikers. I actually value lateral movement when hiking. Trail runners would also would not wear boots.
    -Steve
    TheSnowWay.com "Skiing is not a sport, it is a way of life." - Otto Schniebs

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