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backcountry skiing

bruno1

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What are some good backcountry skiing trails in the N.H and Vt. area? I'm an advanced resort skier but want to earn some turns this year. It will be my first year skiing backcountry.
 

riverc0il

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Pick up David Goodman's book on backcountry skiing. It has a lot of touring stuff in it but about half of the book is downhill oriented and has all the classics. A good first option might be hiking up the Tuckerman Ravine Trail to HoJos and skiing back down the Sherburne Ski Trail in Pinkham Notch.
 

Puck it

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If we get snow in the Boston area. Hit up some of the lost areas such as in Woburn or Prospect Hill in waltham.
 

bruno1

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If we get snow in the Boston area. Hit up some of the lost areas such as in Woburn or Prospect Hill in waltham.
Really! Woburn and Waltham, who would thought that. Somebody mentioned cardigan or chucurra off of the kankamangus
 

snowmonster

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Cardigan is worth it and is an easy way to get into the sport. Hit either the Duke's Trail or the Alexandria Trail. Chocorua is too much of a slog. Moosilauke is a great tour but may be too much for a beginner. I'd save that for later. The trick to getting into bc skiing is to start with the marked trails and get a feel for how your body reacts and how you handle your gear. I agree with Riv's recommendation, pick up the Goodman book. That's what I did. All the tours already mentioned are in the Goodman book plus a few more. It gives you a good list to start from as well as directions. The Sherburne is a good intro.

I skinned Prospect Hill in Waltham. Wait for lots of snow and hit it quickly. Bring rock skis. Just one short pitch. If you're looking to skin around Boston, find a friendly golf course or go to NELSAP.
 

Puck it

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I left off Boston Hill in Middleton, too. I just go behind my house skinning. There is not much for downhill, there are some decent short pitches to get the lungs and legs going for more stuff.
 

David Metsky

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Goodman's book is certainly the place to start. Both Cardigan and Chocorua are mentioned in the book but Cardigan is a much better option for a new backcountry skier. Moosilauke (that's my trip report) is a wonderful ski destination but it's a bigger mountain and requires a bit more of a commitment. Sherby is a great place to get your feet wet (so to speak) about some of the challenges that the backcountry affords. Do you have AT or Tele gear? If not, do you have snowshoes? Nothing will make your day more miserable or attract the ire of other backcountry skiers and riders than postholing the trails.
 

bruno1

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Goodman's book is certainly the place to start. Both Cardigan and Chocorua are mentioned in the book but Cardigan is a much better option for a new backcountry skier. Moosilauke (that's my trip report) is a wonderful ski destination but it's a bigger mountain and requires a bit more of a commitment. Sherby is a great place to get your feet wet (so to speak) about some of the challenges that the backcountry affords. Do you have AT or Tele gear? If not, do you have snowshoes? Nothing will make your day more miserable or attract the ire of other backcountry skiers and riders than postholing the trails.
AT gear, my setup is volkl gotama(golden Buddha) in 176, marker duke bindings and g3 skins. Can't wait to test them out.
 

Nick

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Hmm.... I should pick up AT bindings this year ... this thread i smaking me drool. I have done very little (actually, almost no) backcountry skiing before. Other than charging through uncharted woods at resorts from the lift.
 

snowmonster

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Nothing will make your day more miserable or attract the ire of other backcountry skiers and riders than postholing the trails.

The eleventh commandment is: Thou shall not posthole.

Hmm.... I should pick up AT bindings this year ... this thread i smaking me drool. I have done very little (actually, almost no) backcountry skiing before. Other than charging through uncharted woods at resorts from the lift.

Does this include our adventures at MRG last year? Let me know if you want to join me on one of my adventures. I usually do an end of the season Tux trip. Happy to share the trail with you.
 

Nick

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Does this include our adventures at MRG last year? Let me know if you want to join me on one of my adventures. I usually do an end of the season Tux trip. Happy to share the trail with you.

It does include MRG :) ... actually in that case I lied as I forgot, I did ski Tux once, about ten years ago :)

I'd love to do it again this year. I'm really really hoping for a big snow year!
 

Huck_It_Baby

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I just go behind my house skinning. There is not much for downhill, there are some decent short pitches to get the lungs and legs going for more stuff.

Very cool. I can skin up behind my house too. I have 500-600 Vertical full of trails and pretty sizable cliff drops and steeps!
 

snowmonster

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^ I have a golf course behind my apartment that used to have a rope tow. It's a NELSAPed area. When Boston gets a big dump, I hike over there for a few turns. The advantage of a golf course is that the greens are so well manicured, there are no rocks to worry about. It's not much but, at the very least, it allows me to practice my skinning and self-arrest skills.
 

Puck it

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^ I have a golf course behind my apartment that used to have a rope tow. It's a NELSAPed area. When Boston gets a big dump, I hike over there for a few turns. The advantage of a golf course is that the greens are so well manicured, there are no rocks to worry about. It's not much but, at the very least, it allows me to practice my skinning and self-arrest skills.


Mount Hood?
 

bruno1

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I also think Goodman's book is a great place to start.

Here's a collection of reports (some with video) of places I've been around New England in the past few years: http://nebackcountry.blogspot.com/p/trip-reports.html

Although, part of the fun is scouting out new places to explore.
I was looking at your some of your photos from your collection and noticed the one from killington 2010. If that photo was from that freak storm in oct. I hiked and skied it also.
 
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