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Colorado

Smitty244

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I have a trip to Colorado to ski with a cousin who lives out there. I was new to skiing last season but I’ve been out as much as possible since. I have never been anywhere that had more than 750’ of vertical drop (holiday valley) so I don’t know what to expect. I’m hoping there are slopes for all abilities out there. I’m going to a smaller resort called ski cooper, copper mountain, and probably monarch.


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Smitty244

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Oh, well that’s cool I guess I won’t have to work anymore


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dblskifanatic

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My first reaction was that it is all expert terrain out here! There are runs at any resort that are appropriate for your level of skiing. You did say what your level was. You are not skiing Silverton so you good! Monarch and Cooper are both great for intermediates. There some trails at both that are challenging and probably not appropriate. The lifts are kind of slow at both. Copper might be a little more intimidating but they have terrain for all levels too.


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Zand

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The good news is out of the big resorts in Summit County, Copper might be the best for low level intermediates. Just be ready to have a lot more company on the trails than you're used to.
 

jaytrem

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The good news is out of the big resorts in Summit County, Copper might be the best for low level intermediates. Just be ready to have a lot more company on the trails than you're used to.

I suspect Copper has less skiers per acre than Holiday Valley, but I could be wrong. I'll be there Sunday, will let you know how it compares to Mount Snow.
 

Smitty244

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Also living in northeast Ohio I’ve only gotten to ski powder one day in two years and it was only about 4-5” so if we get dumped on when I’m there that’ll be interesting as well lol.


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Smitty244

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Yeah we are going there the first day to get loosened up a bit


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GregoryIsaacs

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Doesnt Loveland have an entire face dedicated to beginner skiers/learning terrain? Will also save you some $$.

Look into getting Ski Colorado GEM Card for your trip and you'll save even more.
 

Smitty244

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I mean I do all blues and blacks at the resorts within a couple hrs of where I’m from but I just suspect they are much worse out there


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Bumpsis

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You'll have a great time and more than likely improve your skiing skills upon coming back. You'll be amazed how easy the most difficult trails at Holiday Valley will be after your Colorado trip.

I just hope that you'll not have issues with elevation. For some, getting used to being at 7-8k can be a painful experience coming in from the flat lands. Isn't the base elevation of Ski Cooper something close to 10,000 feet?
 

KustyTheKlown

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depends where you go. copper is basically stratton west. not much there that is truly challenging, and a ton of groomed greens and blues. they're just going to be longer than what you are used to, and the elevation may kick your ass depending on your fitness and how fast you adapt. dont drink alcohol for the first 24 hours at elevation.
 

Smitty244

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My cousin told me to drink lots of water before I head out too.


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Abominable

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So exciting! I'll never forget my first trip out west, me and a buddy took the train (!!!) at 16 years old, to Aspen (from just north of NYC).

You've been wearing ten layers of long johns skiing windblown scratchy "packed powder" in low light and freezing temps. You get out there and, sunny! Warm! Beers on the patio in a sweatshirt! Snow, oh my God the snow! I remember us totally overdressed and overheating, blinded without sunglasses and with goggles more appropriate for nightskiing at Mohawk, falling over and actually UNABLE to get up in two feet of fresh snow, just giggling like absolute madmen.

Enjoy it, you'll be spoiled for life.

Drink water, use sunscreen (even if it seems cloudy), take breaks on your runs, and don't go too far off the beaten path (or out of bounds) unless you're with someone who knows what they're doing. Also, keep an eye on where the groomers are, if you get stuck on a mile long bump run with no exit it will really wear you out.
 

big_vert

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Just be ready to have a lot more company on the trails than you're used to.

????????????????? Usually the skier to area ratio in CO is waaaaaaaaaaaaaaay lower than the northleast by like a factor of a gazillion.
 

abc

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depends where you go. copper is basically stratton west. not much there that is truly challenging, and a ton of groomed greens and blues.
The above comment sounds like it's from someone who had never skied Copper! Except I believe you had. So you aren't too good at figuring a mountain out. ;)

To the OP:

Copper is a "wide" mountain, has 3 bases. Conveniently, each base serves up different level of difficulties. If you're an intermediate, I'd suggest you start in the main base, which is the one in the middle. If the run there looks too intimidating for you, head to the right side of the mountain (looker's perspective). That's the side of the resort that's mostly green. Even the blues there are less steep than the blues on the "other side".

Needless to say, the (looker's) left side of the resort are full of blacks. But depends on condition, you may find the blacks out there not as hard as your home mountain!

Yes, the runs will be going on forever. But the snow are often softer and the runs much wider. So it may actually feel easier.

Of the three mountains you mentioned, Copper is the busiest. The other 2 should be pretty quiet.
 

Killingtime

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depends where you go. copper is basically stratton west. not much there that is truly challenging, and a ton of groomed greens and blues. they're just going to be longer than what you are used to, and the elevation may kick your ass depending on your fitness and how fast you adapt. dont drink alcohol for the first 24 hours at elevation.

Two beers at Breckenridge on the first day effed me up good. I learned the hard way
 

KustyTheKlown

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copper is a goddamn joke. the high mountain steep stuff is like 500 vert max. worst terrain in summit/eagle/grand counties by a long shot.
 
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