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How do you keep your feet dry and warm?

skiahman

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Looking for sweaty foot remedies......

Just got a new pair of Salomon RS 100's and like every other boot I've owned, my feet sweat in them to the point where I need to replace my socks with a dry pair mid day and then take a hairdryer to the inner boot at day's end because they're wet too. I use thin ski socks and have even gone no socks but that doesn't work well.

What do AZ'ers do to keep their feet and boots dry? Thanks for any help!
 

drjeff

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Spray anti perspirant on my feet just before I put my ski socks abd boots on in the morning works well for me. I haveva few ski buddies who swear by some baby powder in their ski socks to help with moisture control.

Personally I think the next great advance in boot liners will be when someone devises a truly wicking material for them. The droves of us "swesty feet" folls will be eternally grateful!! :)
 

ski stef

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yeah, not totally shocked but if my feet over heat i'm ok with it.. i get concerned when i can't get my feet warm enough (days like today) where my toes are frozen, heat up in the lift line where they then start to burn (almost more painful than when they are just cold)...... ya unfortunately i have no advice for you, borderline jealousy...

 

deadheadskier

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Hotronics have been a game changer for me. I never have issues with cold feet anymore. Switch them on level 2 and I'm good to go for the day.
 

ski stef

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^met a woman on the gondola at Breck who was using those. She only had great things to say about them. Can you really feel that pad that goes underneath your linings? I feel like that's the main reason I don't use hand/toe warmers. That little space (literally a mm) between the heater, liner and my sock would bug the crap out of me
 

wa-loaf

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^met a woman on the gondola at Breck who was using those. She only had great things to say about them. Can you really feel that pad that goes underneath your linings? I feel like that's the main reason I don't use hand/toe warmers. That little space (literally a mm) between the heater, liner and my sock would bug the crap out of me

I'm really particular about feeling extra stuff in my boots and I don't notice my hottronics. If you don't want to make the leap to the hottronic, bootgloves work pretty well too. They just look kinda goofy.
 

hiroto

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... then take a hairdryer to the inner boot at day's end because they're wet too.

Doesn't help for the midday, but you may want to invest in boots drier. My boots also gets wet no matter how cold the temperature is and boots drying is the must at the end of the day. I happen to have futon drier with shoes/boots drying attachment so I'm using that, but you could buy one of those boots drier on the market.
 

skiahman

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Good ideas, drjeff, I will give those a try. If I am lucky it will work and I won't need a boot dryer. Thanks for the suggestion, AZ'ers!
 

Glenn

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Similar problem...but not as bad. My feet will sweat...then get cold. The idea drjeff posted sounds good. Maybe I'll give it a shot. For now, every day after skiing, the boots go on a boot dryer. It's amazing how much moisture you can see now that the shells (on some boots) are semi see through.
 

Skimaine

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Started using the antiperspirant last year and I think it helps. I also have a boot dryer to make sure the boots are dry and avoid any boot funk.
 

drjeff

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My wife was fit for a new pair of boots this past Sunday. While she was being fit, we started talking with the fitter (who is a good friend) about some of the main causes of "wet" boots, he pulled the liners on my wife's old pair, and started talking about how the exterior of the liner in many boots is basically vinyl which allows no breathing/wicking of the sweat from one's foot :eek: In essence if your feet sweat while skiing, you end up trapping them in a cold "sauna" and the chances of keeping one's foot dry and warm starts decreasing quickly. This is an area where he has hopes that manufacturers will come up with a more breathable, yet durable liner in the future.

Pulling one's liners after a day on the hill to dry both the outside of the liner and the inside of the shell is a good idea. As Glenn mentioned above, some shells now are relatively translucent (mine included) and you can very often see some decent amount of condensation inside the shell (and not in an area where one might expect some external snow leakage to occur either).
 

kickstand

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Pulling one's liners after a day on the hill to dry both the outside of the liner and the inside of the shell is a good idea.

IMHO, this should always be done. If you're going to spend hours at the bootfitter and hundreds of dollars on boots, you should take care of your equipment. If you don't pull the liners, your boots will stink, get moldy, ruin the liners....for something that takes 3 minutes to do, it's definitely worth it. When I used to do a seasonal rental, I loved the sight of everyone's liners around the wood burning stove at the end of a great day of skiing.
 

darent

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^met a woman on the gondola at Breck who was using those. She only had great things to say about them. Can you really feel that pad that goes underneath your linings? I feel like that's the main reason I don't use hand/toe warmers. That little space (literally a mm) between the heater, liner and my sock would bug the crap out of me
the heat element in hotronics when properly installed in the footbed doesn't protrude from the footbed, when it is cold I use toe warmers, but I put them on top of my foot right above my toes. I don't even know they are there.
 

Bene288

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A buddy of mine skis in plastic bags, swears it keeps his boots dry. He just steps into thin grocery bags when he's getting into his boots. It seems like it would enable your foot to slide around in what little room you may have in your boot though.

I have the same problem. Recently (this season), I've been wearing thin dress socks underneath my smart wool. It seems to help keep the boot dry. It used to be I'd change socks everyday by lunchtime, now I can make it comfortably the whole day unless I'm really getting after it.
 

skiNEwhere

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I'm sorry if I am hijacking this thread but I don't think my question merits a new one.

My feet are usually ok until it drops below zero. I've tried toe warmers but they are hard to put in and feel weird in my boot. A few years ago at K (2005 I think) it was -30 at the peak and I was enjoying the line free lift lines so I didn't stop as soon as I should've, when I went to the lodge my feet were practically white and I had to go through the extremely painful thawing process. I always kind of thought the battery boot warmers were kind of a gaper thing, but I'm starting to reconsider. Is it possible that the tightness of your boots can cause this? Are there certain material socks that are better at keeping your feet warm?
 
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