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Ski Area Staffing Concerns

raisingarizona

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There were many people who worked at Stowe when I did solely for the pass. For starters, I wanted to ski weekends too, I'm sure many did, but if you dont need the part-time in the first place (I didnt) why work for a restaurant or something like that and still pay $200 or $300 for a pass when you can just get the pass for free working for the resort itself! Not to mention, it was fun working at Stowe, grinding it out as a dishwasher or hostess at a Mexican restaurant? Not so much.
One of the best jobs I’ve ever had for ski bumming was working the dish pit at the Spring City Diner, Steamboat back in the mid 90’s.

Restaurants are killer gigs for the ski bum. The hours are perfect (dinner only joint), you often get a shift meal, a couple of shift bears and it provides the social scene for that need. It’s all drugs, sex and skiing all day long. FKNA

I often really miss feeling that kind of freedom.

Another killer gig is being the evening bell hop. We used to set up the halls for corporate catering gigs at the Snake River Lodge (probably named something different now and this one was a summer day job) and my checks were often around 1500. That was 2000. I got 1200 one time for moving a couch down from a suite. I had a radio so I’d spend time sleeping in my van after big, late nights. That was some of the best times of my life!
 
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snoseek

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One of the best jobs I’ve ever had for ski bumming was working the dish pit at the Spring City Diner, Steamboat back in the mid 90’s.

Restaurants are killer gigs for the ski bum. The hours are perfect (dinner only joint), you often get a shift meal, a couple of shift bears and it provides the social scene for that need. It’s all drugs, sex and skiing all day long. FKNA

I often really miss feeling that kind of freedom.

Another killer gig is being the evening bell hop. We used to set up the halls for corporate catering gigs at the Snake River Lodge (probably named something different now and this one was a summer day job) and my checks were often around 1500. That was 2000. I got 1200 one time for moving a couch down from a suite. I had a radio so I’d spend time sleeping in my van after big, late nights. That was some of the best times of my life!
100 percent. Many years working nights in restaurants in ski towns. Roll into a warm kitchen after skiing all day and eat whatever you want, work till 10 or 11. Drink a couple beers and smoke a fatty, sleep, wake up and do it all over again!
 

Hawk

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I can't think of anybody that just left because of the resort was bought by a big company. I will say that there has been a pretty good size departure in the last year or two for various reasons. Some management directive, some for better pay oportunitues, some covid related, some just fed up. I can think of at least a dozzen off the top of my head.
Ok One more. Looks like Diggity is going to Bolton to start a new Adventure Blazers type program. Gonne miss him. Are they doing Adventure Blazers and Bush Pilots this year at Sugarbush?
 

kbroderick

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100 percent. Many years working nights in restaurants in ski towns. Roll into a warm kitchen after skiing all day and eat whatever you want, work till 10 or 11. Drink a couple beers and smoke a fatty, sleep, wake up and do it all over again!
From what I hear, that works great at 20 or 25. I don't recommend it getting closer to 40.
 

snoseek

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From what I hear, that works great at 20 or 25. I don't recommend it getting closer to 40.
I do the same sorta thing but moved to events. Yeah cooking line and closing in on 50 aint for me. I still like to cover a shift every once in awhile...mostly in winter when events grind to a halt, then again i hardly work in the winter. Most people I know older still in have a massive drinking problem amongst other issues. It doesnt have to go that way though.
 

raisingarizona

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I do the same sorta thing but moved to events. Yeah cooking line and closing in on 50 aint for me. I still like to cover a shift every once in awhile...mostly in winter when events grind to a halt, then again i hardly work in the winter. Most people I know older still in have a massive drinking problem amongst other issues. It doesnt have to go that way though.
The trade and drinking and drugging seem to go hand and hand.
 

Hawk

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Why not?

As long as you have no other baggage such as kids.
LOL by your reply I have to make the assumption that you are under 40? I did this for 3 or 4 years in my 20's and after about 3 or 4 months of ski season, I was totaly drained. That is a 16-17 hour day of hard work at least 5 days a week and if it is a powder day it is even more taxing. Unless you are in really good shape in your 40's and have not had any significant injurys or medical issues under your belt, that is an extremely hard ask of your body. I could not do that.
 

abc

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Being 40 or 50 surrounded by 20 something year olds would be depressing for myself but if it doesn’t bother ya then cool.
If I'm depressed by simply being surrounded by 20 something year olds in my work environment, I would have had to quit my profession (software engineering) a couple decade ago!

I found surrounded by 20 year olds quite invigorating. Granted, these are not 20 year olds working in dead end jobs. These are inquisitive 20 year olds just starting out with abundant enthusiasm. More like a professor working with graduate student all day. They're my equal in some ways. While in other ways, they look to me for experience.
 

abc

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LOL by your reply I have to make the assumption that you are under 40? I did this for 3 or 4 years in my 20's and after about 3 or 4 months of ski season, I was totaly drained. That is a 16-17 hour day of hard work at least 5 days a week and if it is a powder day it is even more taxing. Unless you are in really good shape in your 40's and have not had any significant injurys or medical issues under your belt, that is an extremely hard ask of your body. I could not do that.
I'm quite a few years over 40. And don't have the health to do it any more. But back in my 40's, I was as good as in my 20's. Actually I was healthier in my 40's than in my 20's, thanks to having taken charge of my lifestyle instead of following the herd of 20 year olds I was part of. No significant injuries up to that point.

But I do get the point it's not sustainable. If you do that in your 20's year after year, it's gonna catch up with ya long before you reach 40. But it isn't the age. It's just how many years you can do that. Like you found out, you can't do it year round, or not for many years.
 
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kbroderick

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Why not?

As long as you have no other baggage such as kids.
I take a lot longer to recover now than I did then. I have worked F&B recently, and I can function just fine working 5-6 hours at a desk and then waiting tables until close; I cannot be on the hill all day, run home, shower & change and wait tables until close (and get up and do it again). Once or twice a winter, yes; even once a week, though, I just need more sleep than that allows (and that's without going out and socializing with F&B coworkers post-shift).
 

snoseek

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In my experience so far the simple act of being on you feet and physically working while dealing the endless mindfuck that is hospitality keeps me young to a degree.

Back in May into June I worked 40 something long hard days straight and yeah I just can't take that kind of abuse anymore that damn near broke me
 

raisingarizona

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I take a lot longer to recover now than I did then. I have worked F&B recently, and I can function just fine working 5-6 hours at a desk and then waiting tables until close; I cannot be on the hill all day, run home, shower & change and wait tables until close (and get up and do it again). Once or twice a winter, yes; even once a week, though, I just need more sleep than that allows (and that's without going out and socializing with F&B coworkers post-shift).
Yup, it was really fun up until about 33-34 years old, then it was time to move on for me.

I’m 46 now and I can still handle really hard work or a big day of skiing but I can’t do both in the same day.
 

kingslug

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Its why I'm going to open up my own little biz...handyman. I was thinking of just getting any old job but then I would still be answering to someone. I figure with all the rental properties all over VT I can drum up some business. Hell..just showing up consistently and doing a good job knocks out half tour competition.
 

ThatGuy

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You should have no trouble finding clients, there’s a surplus of people looking for work done.
 

tumbler

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Its why I'm going to open up my own little biz...handyman. I was thinking of just getting any old job but then I would still be answering to someone. I figure with all the rental properties all over VT I can drum up some business. Hell..just showing up consistently and doing a good job knocks out half tour competition.
you listen well :p good, trustworthy people are hard to find.
 
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