• Welcome to AlpineZone, the largest online community of skiers and snowboarders in the Northeast!

    You may have to REGISTER before you can post. Registering is FREE, gets rid of the majority of advertisements, and lets you participate in giveaways and other AlpineZone events!

Ski areas that "seed" moguls

Greg

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 1, 2001
Messages
31,154
Points
0
As an aspiring bumper, I love the evenly spaced bumps on less steep terrain acheived by manmade moguls. Let's list all the ski areas that you know of that offer "seeded" mogul runs. I know Loon does it, and I believe Catamount does on their Catamount trail. Based on Sunapee's challenge response, it seems they do to. Apparently Jiminy will start this season and Windham indicates they've been making moguls. Any other ski areas that you know of?
 

thetrailboss

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 4, 2004
Messages
29,248
Points
83
Location
NEK by Birth
Greg said:
As an aspiring bumper, I love the evenly spaced bumps on less steep terrain acheived by manmade moguls. Let's list all the ski areas that you know of that offer "seeded" mogul runs. I know Loon does it, and I believe Catamount does on their Catamount trail. Based on Sunapee's challenge response, it seems they do to. Apparently Jiminy will start this season and Windham indicates they've been making moguls. Any other ski areas that you know of?

I tried Sunapee's last year and they were truly ice bumps. :-? Not fun by any means.

A few years back I saw Sunday River get White Heat ready for Bust and Burn and what they did was to groom over the bumps (using a winchcat) and let their ski patrollers/instructors carve out the bumps.
 

Charlie Schuessler

New member
Joined
Nov 7, 2002
Messages
1,126
Points
0
Location
Mont Vernon NH
With all due respect, I love unevenly spaced & sized bumps found on steep terrain created by skiers using their skis. I feel better on conditions like that rather than the machine made bumps created by the grooming crew…to each his own.
 

Tin Woodsman

Active member
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Messages
1,010
Points
38
I think man-made bumps are a pathetic abomination that take away from the challenge of skiing moguls. They are homogenized and normalized. Wouldn't want anyone to have to deal with unevenly spaced bumps and learn how to handle it, now would we? I guess if you think that wide, straight trails that hold snow only due to snowmaking are what skiing's about, then man-made bumps will be for you. To each their own I suppose, but it really just dumbs down the experience, IMHO.
 

Greg

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 1, 2001
Messages
31,154
Points
0
Tin Woodsman said:
I think man-made bumps are a pathetic abomination that take away from the challenge of skiing moguls. They are homogenized and normalized. Wouldn't want anyone to have to deal with unevenly spaced bumps and learn how to handle it, now would we? I guess if you think that wide, straight trails that hold snow only due to snowmaking are what skiing's about, then man-made bumps will be for you. To each their own I suppose, but it really just dumbs down the experience, IMHO.
I disagree. Charlie can vouch for my mogul skills which are beginner to intermediate at best. I've found that seeded runs on the blues are (1) encouraging and (2) enjoyable. I think that it's better to offer intermediate bump runs that help skiers improve, and at the same time preserve the bump runs that form naturally on advanced terrain as a result of skier traffic. If a ski area even allows bumps to form on an intermediate run, they tend to be uneven and erratically spaced and not exactly conducive to learning to ski moguls correctly. I'm all for sowing the seeds...
 

Charlie Schuessler

New member
Joined
Nov 7, 2002
Messages
1,126
Points
0
Location
Mont Vernon NH
Greg understates his mogul skills which approach advanced skill level. Self evaluation is difficult and I find he has very good balance, good independant foot action and good pressure skills. All required for bump skiing.

I agree that seeded runs on the blues are encouraging and enjoyable for the recreational skier. Also it's better to offer intermediate bump runs that help recreational skiers improve, rather than they be on advanced terrain where they become discouraged and in the way...

It is difficult watching any person struggle (seemingly for thier lives at times) on a trail like Superstar or Downdraft at Killington, and I suppose to have an alternative bump trail is good for everyone...
 

Greg

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 1, 2001
Messages
31,154
Points
0
Charlie Schuessler said:
Greg understates his mogul skills which approach advanced skill level.
Maybe by the end of this coming ski season...
 
T

trailbiscuit

Guest
Most ski areas (98%) that host bump competition will seed their moguls. A groomer will go out a lay the basics with a machine, and then let good bumpers ski them in. At SR, it's usually the Gould Academy freestyle team. And 99% of the time, you'll find these on White Heat. If you're looking for goods bumps, I would recommend trying to hit a ski area right after a bump competition, that's when they're usually the best. Unless, of course, it's 18 degrees out and it was 43 and rainy the day before. Can you say, "shattered patella"?
 

Tin Woodsman

Active member
Joined
Jul 12, 2004
Messages
1,010
Points
38
I don't disagree that enabling intermediatte skiers to learn the bumps is a good thing. By no means should aspiring bumpers be relegated to the likes of Outer limits to learn that skill. But I think there is a better way to do it than man made bumps. For example, Semi-tough at SB North may just be the best intermediate bump run I've ever seen. Perfectly pitched ego bumps where the trail always eases off the pitch just in time to slow you down after a steeper section. You can take it in 7 or 8 discreet sections at your own pace, stopping when you want to on a flat. SB North, in its wisdom, pretty much leaves this trail to bump up most of the time. Other hills should learn from this, as it provides a MUCH better launching pad for the aspiring bump skier vs. something they won't experience in the real world of moguls.
 

bvibert

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Aug 30, 2004
Messages
30,394
Points
38
Location
Torrington, CT
Semi-tough is a fun trail. I skiied it when we were at SB last year. There wasn't too many bumps on it when I skiied it though...
 

jwind

New member
Joined
Aug 9, 2004
Messages
52
Points
0
Location
Portland, Maine
trailbiscuit said:
Most ski areas (98%) that host bump competition will seed their moguls.

Absolutely correct. As a former freestyle skier, i can attest to this. A groomer can't just go out and make bumps... it takes skiing afterwards. the groomer is just there to create an even tempo for competitions and such.

trailbiscuit said:
A groomer will go out a lay the basics with a machine, and then let good bumpers ski them in. At SR, it's usually the Gould Academy freestyle team. And 99% of the time, you'll find these on White Heat.?

Funny you mention that. As a Gould Academy Alum i was one of them folks at one time...
 

sledhaulingmedic

New member
Joined
Jun 21, 2004
Messages
1,425
Points
0
Wachusett, 10th Mt.

I think seeding moguls becomes more important as snowboarding becomes more popular. They just can't get a good start, particularly at an area with a lot of intermediate and below level riders.
 

pfedorch

New member
Joined
Jan 29, 2013
Messages
5
Points
0
Mount Snow in Vermont shows seeded moguls on intermediate and beginner trails. I, personally, like it when they groom only half the trail, leaving skiers with the option to enter and leave the mogul field at any time.
 

pfedorch

New member
Joined
Jan 29, 2013
Messages
5
Points
0
Yeah, I noticed that after I'd posted. Found this forum by googling "seeded moguls" and thought it was worth joining, and adding my two cents. I'm amazed at how many posts some of the members, like yourself, seem to have (thousands!).
 

AdironRider

Active member
Joined
Nov 27, 2005
Messages
3,228
Points
38
Wachusett, 10th Mt.

I think seeding moguls becomes more important as snowboarding becomes more popular. They just can't get a good start, particularly at an area with a lot of intermediate and below level riders.

Any backup for that statement?
 
Top