• Welcome to AlpineZone, the largest online community of skiers and snowboarders in the Northeast!

    You may have to REGISTER before you can post. Registering is FREE, gets rid of the majority of advertisements, and lets you participate in giveaways and other AlpineZone events!

Ski Waxing - Can you judge when it's "right" by touch??

Sum1

New member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
60
Points
0
Location
CT
Hi All,

I've been waxing and tuning my skis for a couple of seasons and I'm still trying to get the waxing part "right."
The wax I use: Purl Microcrystalline Speed Wax Purple - All Temp
In the beginning, I tended to melt on far too much and leave most of it on - it felt pretty smooth and slippy while skiing and I didn't think it could possibly hurt the skis any, so I stuck with that for a while.
Now I want to improve technique by following some youtube vids, and online how-to's.
So, I'm using less wax material, letting it sit overnight, carefully scrape it down to a fine layer, and then swipe the bases vigorously with a combo. of Rough ---> Medium ---> Fine Scotch-brite sheets.

Upon completion, I definitely see a nice sheen on the bases, but they seem a bit tacky, almost like some fine lint is left on the surface. Is this generally what you get with using the Scotch-brite sheets; or, is this not a good finish and I need to start over?

Likely I won't have a chance to test the ride tomorrow, so trying to figure out if I'm on the right track or need a do-over.

Thank you for your help.
 

bigbog

Active member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Messages
4,882
Points
38
Location
Bangor and the state's woodlands
Fwiw...for the skiday wax...wait(let dry in room temp for ~1hr), scrape and then just brush...
Iron with the thin sheets if too much wax has been dripped onto base...y/n? ...But the softer brush seems to do the trick for creating a slick base = works for me in cold temps(blue wax), but I have had a shop wax em' and the bases were a more wet texture...:dontknow:
 

drjeff

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
18,197
Points
113
Location
Brooklyn, CT
If you're worried about excess residue post scraping and brushing (or even pre-waxing) get yourself a roll of Swix Fiberlene paper - it does a great job of removing surface debris without affecting the structure of the base. And a small roll should last you easily 100 tunes
 

Sum1

New member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
60
Points
0
Location
CT
Fwiw...for the skiday wax...wait(let dry in room temp for ~1hr), scrape and then just brush...
Iron with the thin sheets if too much wax has been dripped onto base...y/n? ...But the softer brush seems to do the trick for creating a slick base = works for me in cold temps(blue wax), but I have had a shop wax em' and the bases were a more wet texture...:dontknow:

Thanks for your reply, BB. If I'm understanding right, sounds like you prefer a nylon brush after scraping off the wax - that makes for a smooth base. Use the scotch-brite sheet only if it looks/feels like I may need to take off a bit more wax?
 

Sum1

New member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
60
Points
0
Location
CT
If you're worried about excess residue post scraping and brushing (or even pre-waxing) get yourself a roll of Swix Fiberlene paper - it does a great job of removing surface debris without affecting the structure of the base. And a small roll should last you easily 100 tunes

Dr. Jeff, thanks too for the guidance.
I'm checking out the product and trying to figure it out -- so you actually spread the dripped wax by placing the iron on the sheet? And the Swix sheet will spread the wax without absorbing it all?

Thanks.
 

drjeff

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
18,197
Points
113
Location
Brooklyn, CT
Dr. Jeff, thanks too for the guidance.
I'm checking out the product and trying to figure it out -- so you actually spread the dripped wax by placing the iron on the sheet? And the Swix sheet will spread the wax without absorbing it all?

Thanks.

Nope - you tune + wax as usual and then both prior to waxing to remove an file debris and/or dirt on the base and then after waxing/scraping/ brushes use the fiberlene to remove any post waxing debris - almost think of it as a "handi-wipe" for skis!
 

skirick

New member
Joined
May 21, 2008
Messages
39
Points
0
Location
Westchester County, NY
I've been tuning and waxing for a long time, but the one thing that I never quite got the hang of is how much to scrape off. At 1st I was scraping until I wasn't getting too much more off. After and while I realized that maybe I was taking too much and now I only make 3 or 4 passes. Anyone have a take on this?
 

Sum1

New member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
60
Points
0
Location
CT
@skirick - Since my skills are not refined, it's been hard for me to tell what is the right amount of wax to put on and take off. My skis feel pretty frictionless leaving alot of wax on the skis. More experienced DIY-Ski guys have told me that I should take more off the ski so I'm giving it a try.
 

planb420

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
874
Points
0
Location
Winsted, CT
I've been tuning and waxing for a long time, but the one thing that I never quite got the hang of is how much to scrape off. At 1st I was scraping until I wasn't getting too much more off. After and while I realized that maybe I was taking too much and now I only make 3 or 4 passes. Anyone have a take on this?

SCRAPE IT ALL OFF......I tune not only my QUIVER (As I have seen this term con\me under fire today, but I'm using it anyway) of 6 boards but all my friends as well. Also to minimize the amount of wax waste I have stopped using the drip meathod and adopted briefly rubbing the bar of wax on the iron till its molten and then rubbing it on the board in stripes. I have noticed a much greater waxz savings...FYI
 

marcski

New member
Joined
Jan 10, 2005
Messages
4,576
Points
0
Location
Westchester County, NY and a Mountain near you!
I was always under the impression that you want the wax in the base not really on it. I scrape well (it also helps to keep the scrapers sharp, they tend to dull fairly easily making for more work), then brush. I use a few strokes with a brass and then a nylon brush. Save the scotch pads for cleaning pre-wax.
 

〽❄❅

Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Messages
474
Points
16
Location
Philadelphia
[h=2]Ski Waxing - Can you judge when it's "right" by touch??[/h]Brazilian Waxing, American Waxing and French Waxing, hell yeah! ...Ski Waxing...thats a new one must be Polish? But yes i can.
 

Sum1

New member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
60
Points
0
Location
CT
I have stopped using the drip meathod and adopted briefly rubbing the bar of wax on the iron till its molten and then rubbing it on the board in stripes. I have noticed a much greater waxz savings...FYI

Thx PlanB, that's an interesting technique I would never have thought of.
Might try that as I learn to become more precise in using the iron.
 

Sum1

New member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
60
Points
0
Location
CT
you want the wax in the base not really on it. . . . I use a few strokes with a brass and then a nylon brush. Save the scotch pads for cleaning pre-wax.

I like that about the wax -- think of it as integrating into the base, not trying to add another layer to the base.
Next round, I'll give my nylon brush a try in place of the Scotch-sheets.
Thx for the tip.
 

planb420

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
874
Points
0
Location
Winsted, CT
Also try Crack Grease wax...STELLAR STUFF in all conditions and wears quite well. The smells are off the charts...favorites right now are PB&J and Dirty Hippie
 

Sum1

New member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Messages
60
Points
0
Location
CT
I wanted to report back.
I woke up early Sunday and had that restless feeling . . . a few hours later approx. 8:30 am, I'd somehow transported to the base at Killington. :)
Gotta give myself some credit, the skis felt good all day, smooth and easy.
There was an inch or two of overnight fluff on top of some very firm/icy hard pack.
Light snow on/off most of the day and most points on the map held up well until 3 pm.
Once the sun dipped to a certain point and temp changed a few degrees, suddenly everything felt scraped off and iced.
The main point: starting to get a better feel for what I'm doing and incorporating your thoughtful suggestions is only going to make it better.
Let the good times roll!
Thanks for your input.
 

planb420

New member
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
874
Points
0
Location
Winsted, CT
http://www.crackgrease.com/storeusa/usa.html

It says snowboard wax - is it okay for skis too? no difference?


No Diff at all...I use it on both myself.

Also if this helps this is my method as posted in another thread (mostly anyhow):

"Figure I'd post my method here and see what the Veteran waxers out there think. Its a system I have worked on for the past 3 seasons or so, it just got too expensive to take it somewhere to have it done only to get back an inferior product..especially when i get out over 80 days and have 6 boards.



My setup is about as basic as it gets as far as my "Board Vice" goes, my "vice" is simply one 6ft long 2x4 with 2 milk crates attached, and to keep the top sheet undamaged I have placed old kitchen towels over the edges of the milk crates where it contacts the board.
:dontknow:
There are many ways to wax your board but I'll write up just a general waxing for riding. (other kinds are like a hot scape or waxing the base for storage).

The Gear you will need: Plastic scraper(s) always best to have more than one (one with a notch for cleaning wax off the edges is ideal but not nessessary, a also dont use metal ones), Gummy Stone (red) to debur edges, cork brush, nylon bristled brush (texture brush), Waxing Iron (NOT A HOUSEHOLD ONE...will work but not nearly as well) trust me and invest your money here...usually about 40-60 bucks for a decent one, Swix "scotch brite" pads, Murphys Citruis Oil Soap spray (base cleaner), and wax (user preference). Safety materials (ganja), beers, and some tunes.

The Process:
Step one: Remove Bindings and ALL HARDWARE (i.e. if its a burton channel remove the sliders) if you dont the metal will heat up once the iron is applied and cause you base to pucker...not the end of the world but it will make things harder to scrape later on.

Step two: Clean the top sheet, channel, inserts from tip to tail with the Murphys and some paper towel.

Step Three: Now flip the board its time to inspect the base/edges and give the base a good prep. Iwill visually check all the edges to look for seperations or gaps. (found one early enough a few seasons ago to have burton replace the board for no charge, so this can pay off) I will also check for deep scratches/core shots (areas of missing ptex all the way to the wood core). Once the inspection is done I will take the nylon brush and brush the entire base tip to tail to remove sand and other imbedded debris.

Step Four: Take your gummy stone to the edges and run it flat along the base edge around the entire board to remove the small burrs that develope while riding, then do the same on the sidewall edge laying it on the edge at the same angle and running it along the edge the same as the base. (This is also the time I would de-tune the edges, but thats for another post) Once you have de-burred your edges run your paper towel with some Murphys on it to clean up the shavings.

Step Five: Lightly spray the base with the Murphys and wipe tip to tail in a firm back an forth motion. This should remove any loose wax particles and any other unwanted particulate on your base before you add you new wax and lock it in the pores. MAKE SURE TO LET THE BASE COMPLETELY DRY OUT from the Murphys before you move on to the next step!!

Step Six: Now its time for the wax, I like to take the bar and do a quick rub down from tip to tail to ensure coverage. Then you take the Iron and melt the wax till its molten and stripe it across the base. Make sure you concentrate the majority of the wax along the edges as they are what gets used the most when riding. Dont go crazy in this stage...remember whatever extra you put on not only do you have to scrape off but its also lost cost interms of wax. (it will take you a few times to get the perfect amount) When I wax my boards I tend to do a wax blend depending on conditions... (all in the same step so in the next it is melted into the base together) Apply wax to the curved tip and tail sparingly as its a pain in the ass to scrape off later.) My favorite wax is "CRACK GREASE CHOAD CHEESE WAX".

Step Seven: Use your iron to melt the wax into the base from tip to tail (DO NOT move the iron in an edge to edge motion...ONLY TIP TO TAIL) PRO TIP: DONT LEAVE THE IRON IN ONE PLACE OR WORK ONE SPOT TOO LONG, as this could burn the base and close the pores in that spot forever, it could also lead to delam in your board...both suck SO DONT DO IT!

Step Eight: Patience........let the board sit as long as you can, this allows the pores in the base to close and lock in the wax you just worked so hard to lay into it. I prefer to let it sit over night to be sure, but if your in a hurry you can just find a cool spot in your house and place it there for a few hours before moving on.

Step Nine: Scrape and Scrape and Scrape.....and just when you think your done SCRAPE AGAIN!!!!!! Seriously you will hate yourself if you dont get it all so keep going till nothing comes off. When scraping vary the edge your using on your scraper as the miniscule edge variences will keep you from removing the wax efficently (as the edges dull they can be resharpened with a dremel tool). DO THIS TIP TO TAIL AS WELL! (the reason this is stressed is because the board texture runs from tip to tail and you want to maintain that structure as much as possible through this process). If you have a scraper with the notch use it to clean the wax off all edges, if not then use the skinny edge to clean off the rails.

Step Ten: The finish, once all has been scraped off then take your Nylon/Texture brush and use it in a Tip to Tail motion to re-structure your base as well as cleaning wax debris out of said texture. I then like to take my cork brush and with firm even pressure I wipe from Tip to Tail to work in any remaining bits of wax that went unchecked in the earlier steps. (this brush creates friction and helps to melt and distribute the leftover wax into the base, the base should have almost a glossy look) Once the cork brush done I then take a Swix "scotch brite pad" and gently wipe from Tip to Tail to re-lay the texture back into the base. (this texture is key to breaking the suction between your board and the thin layer of water formed beneath it while riding.)

Step Eleven: Remount and ENJOY THAT SHIT!":thumbup:
 
Top