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Visibly High Edges

ss20

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Jan 13, 2013
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I don't even need a truebar, I can see it with my eyes and feel it with my fingers. What's concerning me is I've never had this problem before, I'm always good about keeping stuff tuned up. So it's been maybe 22-25 ski days since a grind. Probably the longest number of ski days for this pair without a shop tune, but they're three years only and now my poor condition skis. What's interesting is it's only really really edge high on one side of one ski.

How edge high is it? The girl running the tune shop at windham today said "probably take 30 passes" on the belt when I showed her...I know that's a lot hahaha. She also said she would file it down first to do less wear on her machine. I only started feeling "something" the past few ski days...now I know what it was lol. As I said, never had high edges like THIS before. I'm taking them to the local shop to be fixed tho.

A- is it concerning that is only one edge of one ski?
B- is it concerning this is only happening roughly 25 days without a grind?
C- what will the shop do to fix this? Curiousity question more than anything.
 

drjeff

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Jan 18, 2006
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Brooklyn, CT
I don't even need a truebar, I can see it with my eyes and feel it with my fingers. What's concerning me is I've never had this problem before, I'm always good about keeping stuff tuned up. So it's been maybe 22-25 ski days since a grind. Probably the longest number of ski days for this pair without a shop tune, but they're three years only and now my poor condition skis. What's interesting is it's only really really edge high on one side of one ski.

How edge high is it? The girl running the tune shop at windham today said "probably take 30 passes" on the belt when I showed her...I know that's a lot hahaha. She also said she would file it down first to do less wear on her machine. I only started feeling "something" the past few ski days...now I know what it was lol. As I said, never had high edges like THIS before. I'm taking them to the local shop to be fixed tho.

A- is it concerning that is only one edge of one ski?
B- is it concerning this is only happening roughly 25 days without a grind?
C- what will the shop do to fix this? Curiousity question more than anything.
How many days were on what could be characterized as coarse, abrasive snow?

Also do you alternate which ski goes on your left and right feet, or always put the same ski on the same foot?

High number of days on abrasive snow and skis always on the same foot can do that.

A good stone grind should solve it, then keep them waxed regularly to reduce the risk of base burn along the turning edge which can accelerate wear of the base material.
 

ss20

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Location
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How many days were on what could be characterized as coarse, abrasive snow?

Also do you alternate which ski goes on your left and right feet, or always put the same ski on the same foot?

High number of days on abrasive snow and skis always on the same foot can do that.

A good stone grind should solve it, then keep them waxed regularly to reduce the risk of base burn along the turning edge which can accelerate wear of the base material.

I would say most of the days are on hard man-made. Unfortunately they are identical skis....I know many companies are getting away from this so it's easier to alternate. Knowing we are creatures of habit even in our minute habits there's probably a very good chance the skis are on the same feet and not getting switched to a 50/50 mix or even close. I am good about waxing (it's the easiest thing to do!) but it is generic Hertel wax. Pretty soft stuff meant for all conditions. Do you think getting some cold-weather harder wax would be better for the skis on cold hardpack days when there's no snow softening?

To me it's just strange this would be an issue for me. Never seen it before. Not sure what I'm doing now that's different from the past...made me suspect it's an aging/durability issue with the skis but maybe 20ish days on hard snow would be enough?

I'll be taking them to the shop and first thing back I'll mark them with some old fashion duct tape so I can alternate properly!
 

drjeff

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Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
17,339
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Location
Brooklyn, CT
I would say most of the days are on hard man-made. Unfortunately they are identical skis....I know many companies are getting away from this so it's easier to alternate. Knowing we are creatures of habit even in our minute habits there's probably a very good chance the skis are on the same feet and not getting switched to a 50/50 mix or even close. I am good about waxing (it's the easiest thing to do!) but it is generic Hertel wax. Pretty soft stuff meant for all conditions. Do you think getting some cold-weather harder wax would be better for the skis on cold hardpack days when there's no snow softening?

To me it's just strange this would be an issue for me. Never seen it before. Not sure what I'm doing now that's different from the past...made me suspect it's an aging/durability issue with the skis but maybe 20ish days on hard snow would be enough?

I'll be taking them to the shop and first thing back I'll mark them with some old fashion duct tape so I can alternate properly!
Honestly last season, after attending a TOKO waxing clinic, I changed how I wax my skis, after doing it pretty much the same way for 35yrs, and it made a difference with respect to base burn adjacent to the edges for sure!

I now put down either a cold temp blue wax or medium temp red wax if it's going to be a warm weekend. Wax it in, let it cool, scrape and brush. Then based on the likely air and snow temp the next day, I then use a temp specific spray paraffin overlay. Let it dry, and brush it. That's it. Then if it's a weekend, after day 1, I reapply the spray paraffin before day 2 and then again before day 3. The decrease in base burn adjacent to the edges is clearly apparent, and my skis run great all weekend long.

Get that harder, cold level wax ironed I first to really protect the base!>[
 

jimmywilson69

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Oct 18, 2010
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Location
Dillsburg, PA
Honestly last season, after attending a TOKO waxing clinic, I changed how I wax my skis, after doing it pretty much the same way for 35yrs, and it made a difference with respect to base burn adjacent to the edges for sure!

I now put down either a cold temp blue wax or medium temp red wax if it's going to be a warm weekend. Wax it in, let it cool, scrape and brush. Then based on the likely air and snow temp the next day, I then use a temp specific spray paraffin overlay. Let it dry, and brush it. That's it. Then if it's a weekend, after day 1, I reapply the spray paraffin before day 2 and then again before day 3. The decrease in base burn adjacent to the edges is clearly apparent, and my skis run great all weekend long.

Get that harder, cold level wax ironed I first to really protect the base!>[
Are you using the harder cold weather wax just near the edges or the entire base?

I've done the cold wax near each edge then added regular wax in the middle on top
 

drjeff

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Location
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Are you using the harder cold weather wax just near the edges or the entire base?

I've done the cold wax near each edge then added regular wax in the middle on top
Full width cold weather (Toko Blue for me) wax as my base - sometimes for anticipated warmer days (say 30+ degrees) I'll use a medium temp (Toko Red) as my base wax, and then after scraping and brushing, a more temp specific spray paraffin overlay.

For example, today at Mount Snow the temps are supposed to be in the upper 20's/low 30's so I hot waxed a red base, and then overlayed with yellow (warm) spray paraffin. Depending on how many runs I take today, I may or may not reapply the spray paraffin for tomorrow, and based on the temps the next few days, won't apply another base hot wax layer for 3 or 4 days of skiing and/or a dramatic drop in temps
 
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