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where should you live NYTimes quiz

deadheadskier

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The stretch between Portsmouth and Portland is one of the best places to live in New England.

Easy access to mountains, ocean, lakes, and Boston.

I love Vermont, but I grew up near the ocean and I miss it quite a bit.

I would extend that stretch south to Newburyport and Amesbury area. I said I couldn't live in Mass, but I guess I could live in those two communities. They're both more similar to the Southern Maine and NH Seacoast area than suburban Boston. But the tax advantages of living in NH during working years makes this a better choice.

All the reasons you listed are what I love.

After living in Mass until 14, I spent high school, college and most of my 20s in VT. I loved it, but vastly prefer where I am today. I only occasionally miss VT and that's really just the easier access to Northern VT skiing.
 

LonghornSkier

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New Canaan, CT, Lexington, MA, and Summit, NJ. Funny thing is I grew up next to Lexington and swore I’d never go back.

Reality is-being in my late 20’s and in a career heavily weighted toward the northeast (that requires being semi-tethered to an office)-that I’ll probably end up somewhere similar to what was suggested by the NYT. That said-would prefer to get a bit more bang for my buck housing wise. More of a Ridgefield or Bedford guy than a Lexington/New Canaan.
 

snoseek

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I would extend that stretch south to Newburyport and Amesbury area. I said I couldn't live in Mass, but I guess I could live in those two communities. They're both more similar to the Southern Maine and NH Seacoast area than suburban Boston. But the tax advantages of living in NH during working years makes this a better choice.

All the reasons you listed are what I love.

After living in Mass until 14, I spent high school, college and most of my 20s in VT. I loved it, but vastly prefer where I am today. I only occasionally miss VT and that's really just the easier access to Northern VT skiing.
Amesbury has come such a long way in my lifetime. I like that whole area from the coast to haverhill. And yeah even haverhill is somehow not as shitty as it once was.
 

Smellytele

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Right where I want to be
Amesbury has come such a long way in my lifetime. I like that whole area from the coast to haverhill. And yeah even haverhill is somehow not as shitty as it once was.
haverhill used to be the part of the golden line. Lowell, Lawrence and Haverhill. All had their individual problems.
 
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deadheadskier

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Jayson Blair and Jill Abramson

haverhill used to be the part of the golden line. Lowell, Lawrence and Haverhill. All had their individual problems.

Haverhill and especially Lowell have certainly turned things around in the past 20 years. Lawrence not as much. I have a number of friends who have moved to Lowell in the past 15 years. Most of these folks lived down near Boston in either Alston or Cambridge. They all dig Lowell. Lots of Boston type amenities downtown, but much more affordable and easier access to the country.
 

Bumpsis

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Fun quiz. Puts me pretty much in places that I already know and like, NH, VT, although some of the places are misses. It also puts me in Great Barrington - never been there. Ususally just blow through Berkshiers. It would be an interesting project to just go and visit the places on the list that came up.
 

KustyTheKlown

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Fun quiz. Puts me pretty much in places that I already know and like, NH, VT, although some of the places are misses. It also puts me in Great Barrington - never been there. Ususally just blow through Berkshiers. It would be an interesting project to just go and visit the places on the list that came up.

Route 7 thru northwestern Mass is a nice drive thru some cute towns. I haven’t done much more than drive thru but they seem like pleasant places to live. Prob not cheap.
 

Edd

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My answers put me in Berlin, NH. I would have expected NH, but closer to Concord.
Berlin is decently situated for a skier. I haven’t been watching but I’d expect real estate to perk up there at some point if it already hasn’t.
 

deadheadskier

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I'm not sure on real estate perking up. The town is still shedding population. The increase in ATV tourism has helped the local economy some, but the job opportunities are still pretty slim. Gorham population continues to decline as well.
 

BenedictGomez

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I thought people were moving out of NH. Made me wonder "what's wrong with me?"

Look at census data (all publicly available info), NH & ME are the only northeastern states which didnt lost population in the last few years, which makes sense given NH is the only northeastern state which isnt completely bat**** insane. For instance, New York State lost about 125,000 people in the last few years, which, if it was your job to understand population dynamics, this fact would be almost imperceptibly shocking to you given all the advantages it has in terms of immigration - yet people are fleeing like crazy.
 

Abubob

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Look at census data (all publicly available info), NH & ME are the only northeastern states which didnt lost population in the last few years, which makes sense given NH is the only northeastern state which isnt completely bat**** insane. For instance, New York State lost about 125,000 people in the last few years, which, if it was your job to understand population dynamics, this fact would be almost imperceptibly shocking to you given all the advantages it has in terms of immigration - yet people are fleeing like crazy.
It thankfully isn’t my job to keep of population growth or decline. If it’s grown it must be pretty recent. I know of several families that have moved out of the area in the last 10 years and maybe 6 individuals that have moved into the state. Just my own experience.
 

deadheadskier

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Look at census data (all publicly available info), NH & ME are the only northeastern states which didnt lost population in the last few years, which makes sense given NH is the only northeastern state which isnt completely bat**** insane. For instance, New York State lost about 125,000 people in the last few years, which, if it was your job to understand population dynamics, this fact would be almost imperceptibly shocking to you given all the advantages it has in terms of immigration - yet people are fleeing like crazy.

What source are you looking at?

Mass is still growing too.

 

BenedictGomez

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What source are you looking at?

Mass is still growing too.

I was writing about, "in the last few years", not the standard 10 year data. If you just look at Census data from 10 years to 10 years basically everyone gains population except a few states because the country is growing in general, especially via foreigners immigrating. Here's a little blip I just found on bankrate showing the movement.

 

thebigo

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Except for November and April. Those months, like the rest of New England, positively suck.
November is one of the best months of the year. The tourists are gone, trails are dry, air is crisp, bugs are dead - I hike with my dog daily at lunch the entire month. April has some of the best spring skiing.

May absolutely sucks, the minute the may flys swarm, I retreat indoors.
 

deadheadskier

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November is one of the best months of the year. The tourists are gone, trails are dry, air is crisp, bugs are dead - I hike with my dog daily at lunch the entire month. April has some of the best spring skiing.

May absolutely sucks, the minute the may flys swarm, I retreat indoors.

You're out of your mind. Over half the month of November is dreary, wet and 45 degrees. Just pure frustration waiting for ski season to start. Just look at this year and last as prime examples.

And April is 100% overrated for spring skiing in New England. For every one bluebird day, there are 2 that are cloudy, 35 degrees, coral reef surfaces or it's raining. The diehard skiers question why almost every place shuts down by mid April and that's the reason. It's too unreliable. We average like 20 days with precipitation that month and it's mostly rain.

Easily the worst weather in Northern New England is from about 10/20 - 11/20 and about 4/15 - 5/15. Skiing sucks most of the time and it's not warm or dry enough to do anything enjoyable outdoors. May flies aren't really an issue out on Winnipesaukee.

Hopefully in retirement for those two months, I'll be right where I'll be tomorrow. On a boat in the Gulf in 70+ degrees and sunshine.
 
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