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Who makes adult one-piece ski suits for women?

seriously

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Started skiing last year, got about 30 days in. Learned quickly. Love it, and chomping at the bit to head out this season already.

My only problem is I was never able to get warm enough, which made it a very challenging season (I'm a very small person and my blood pressure is dangerously low and I have anemia -- won the body dysfunction lottery). Went through about 20 different combinations of layering and outer items, nothing was enough. Underneath it all my skin was cold as a dead fish. And it was too bulky -- I could barely move when I had five shirts on and five pairs of pants.

This year I'm trying to streamline as much as possible -- just bought the new Columbia heated vest which should fix everything since apparently my body generates zero heat (fingers crossed), and added the Airblaster Ninja Suit as a one-piece base layer.

Now, I'd like to do a one-piece snow suit, just to keep things easy, and keep my entire body covered with no gaps. I've found the Airblaster suit, but it is for younger snowboarders, not really my thing. I need a more age-appropriate, less eye-blinding option. However, it looks like no one actually makes one-piece suits for women.

Does anyone know who is manufacturing them this year? Thanks.
 

ScottySkis

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Did you wear good thermals polypropylene is great it will help keep you warm and dry even if it gets wet.

I
 

seriously

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Unfortunately I tried everything - polypropylene, silk, fleece, merino wool, alpaca wool, the Columbia Omniheat line, UA's Cold Gear, a North Face hardcore winter runner's suit, all the Hot Chillys line, thermal runner tights, I think I spent over a thousand dollars just on baselayers. I would wear many at the same time. Nothing worked. The problem is your body has to generate heat for them to work -- mine just doesn't. Underneath all those layers my skin is like ice -- nothing generated. That's why I'm trying the Columbia heated vest -- maybe if that generates the heat for me I will be warm?
 

ScottySkis

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Unfortunately I tried everything - polypropylene, silk, fleece, merino wool, alpaca wool, the Columbia Omniheat line, UA's Cold Gear, a North Face hardcore winter runner's suit, all the Hot Chillys line, thermal runner tights, I think I spent over a thousand dollars just on baselayers. I would wear many at the same time. Nothing worked. The problem is your body has to generate heat for them to work -- mine just doesn't. Underneath all those layers my skin is like ice -- nothing generated. That's why I'm trying the Columbia heated vest -- maybe if that generates the heat for me I will be warm?

That sucks sorry you spent so much money, all I can say is maybe have a hair dryer under your coat,lol.

Sent from my ADR6410LVW using Tapatalk 2
 

seriously

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I don't know much about the one piece suits, but 30 days in your first year is pretty impressive!

It's hard for me to say, I'm from the south, born and bred, so the whole thing was foreign to me -- don't really know what a normal season is. Started completely afraid to put the skis on, thinking I was going to die, surely, but ended up confident on blues and "light" blacks. Can't wait to keep going. Have a lot of free time so I was able to hit Sunday River, Killington, Okemo, Jay, Sunapee, Waterville Valley, Bretton Woods, Pico, and Smuggs, all several times. Was amazing fun, looking forward to hitting Sugarloaf, Sugarbush, Loon, Gunstock, Cannon, Stowe, Stratton...all the ones I missed.

Just dying for the snow to start, and to find a way to keep warm.
 

seriously

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Nick

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It's hard for me to say, I'm from the south, born and bred, so the whole thing was foreign to me -- don't really know what a normal season is. Started completely afraid to put the skis on, thinking I was going to die, surely, but ended up confident on blues and "light" blacks. Can't wait to keep going. Have a lot of free time so I was able to hit Sunday River, Killington, Okemo, Jay, Sunapee, Waterville Valley, Bretton Woods, Pico, and Smuggs, all several times. Was amazing fun, looking forward to hitting Sugarloaf, Sugarbush, Loon, Gunstock, Cannon, Stowe, Stratton...all the ones I missed.

Just dying for the snow to start, and to find a way to keep warm.

That's great!

You should come join us at our annual Summit at Sugarloaf Feb 8- 10th.

http://forums.alpinezone.com/showth...-February-8th-10th-2013-at-Sugarloaf-Mountain

On the topic of snow suits, unless you are skiing deep powder, typically you will be OK with separates and a jacket that has a snowskirt or might be a little longer with a waist cinch.

What are you using now for clothes?

I typically use thermal base layers, and then a thin shell over it. if it's colder, I will throw on a midweight layer as well. My jacket has both a snowskirt and a cinch at the bottom so it seals me up pretty good. You could also wear overall snow pants that go up higher as well.

I know you said it doesn't work for you, but I don't know how much warmer a one piece is. The only real advantage to one pieces is no snow getting to your body, I don't know that they are necessarily warmer.

Maybe you should eat more fattening foods or something before the winter hahaha.... built up some more natural insulation :lol:
 

bigbog

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It's hard for me to say, I'm from the south, born and bred, so the whole thing was foreign to me -- don't really know what a normal season is. Started completely afraid to put the skis on, thinking I was going to die, surely, but ended up confident on blues and "light" blacks. Can't wait to keep going. Have a lot of free time so I was able to hit Sunday River, Killington, Okemo, Jay, Sunapee, Waterville Valley, Bretton Woods, Pico, and Smuggs, all several times. Was amazing fun, looking forward to hitting Sugarloaf, Sugarbush, Loon, Gunstock, Cannon, Stowe, Stratton...all the ones I missed.

Just dying for the snow to start, and to find a way to keep warm.

This seriously sounds like a dmc troll with good humor!LOL.... Well, if legit...all you mentioned above(in your previous reply) is WAYYY too much! As some have mentioned...keeping it simple, **With the Appropriate MATERIALS**, is what works.
What I didn't see(maybe missed via my rushed reads) is a very thin, light silk/wool skin(base) layer. "PolarMax midweights" and others are common brands. The largest market is in-shape, teens/20somethings....and my opinion on some of the base-layering products, tailored to them is not that great for everyone else.
Remember what actually keeps one warm is the AIR in-between the layers...so if you over-scrunch your layers = end-result will often not be what you expect. 1) skin(base) layer wicks perspiration off your skin... 2) light layer for warmth over that, and 3) outer breatheable jacket/shell. If you go heavier(think one-piece) on the outside...make the #2 inner layer real light. If you're also loading up with either too many or the wrong material of sock....cold can work its way up from your feet to your core. The core is everything.... Also look at your boot fit...you maybe be buckling down too much to make up for a boot that's a shellsize too big...y/n?
 

severine

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Welcome! Overdoing the layers could be what's making them not work--I agree with that. I have found that I've been able to get down to a merino wool base layer and just my jacket/ski pants over that; one additional midweight layer on really cold days. You think adding more layers helps, but it makes things worse.

That said, one-piece skiwear for women is hard to find. Could be the fact that nobody wants that dragging on the floor in the ladies room on bathroom breaks--I shudder just to think it would come in contact with! Bogner used to make them--think high-end 80s--but I don't know if they do anymore, or if you'd want to sink that kind of pocket change into a onesie. What about bibs with a jacket over that? More functional, easier to find.

A couple years ago, one of the big names did have some one-piece styles, but the name is escaping me right now. If I think of it or find it, I'll let you know. Good luck!
 

riverc0il

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I'll second severine's comment that multiple base layers is going to do more harm than good. Three layers is usually recommended: base, insulation, outer. You may want to look into expedition weight layers, e.g. something like Patagonia Capilene 4. Layer over it with a down puffy and a hard shell. If that doesn't keep you warm, you better get used to being cold. :)

Another thing you might consider is doing some light exercise before starting to ski. Your body WILL produce excessive amounts of heat if you do something like a short hike. Then layer up. Grab your skis and hike up the bunny hill. When you are burning up super hot (won't take long if you are fully dressed, trust me), ski back down.
 

LiquidFeet

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Over on Epic there was a long thread on current one-piece suits. The people posting were all guys, I think, but the manufacturers who make them for guys may also make them for women. Here you go:

http://www.epicski.com/t/113478/should-i-go-for-a-one-piece-suit-this-season

Also, do you wear a helmet? If not, you need to. Its greatest value is to keep your head warm, and all the blood that flows through your head needs to be warm if you don't want a cold body. If you have a helmet, add under it a wool or fleece beanie, and use two fleece neck gaiters around your neck. You can also add a band around your ears and a face mask. Goggles, of course. If you keep your head warm it will help a lot. The only part of my body exposed to the air is the tip of my nose. I have Reynaud's syndrome and am uncommonly cold in perhaps the same way as you.

Wear mittens on your hands, not gloves. No glove will be as warm as a pair of mittens. Buy a box of 50 sets of hand warmers, the little packages that get warm when you open them, and put one in each mitten right above your fingertips, touching your skin. Your hands will be very happy. Try some other type of insulation first before goosedown in those mittens, because down tends to get soggy. No good.

Do you have Hottronics in your boots to keep your feet warm? If not, there's a great way to spend $200, oh and get the extra clip thingy that keeps the expensive batteries from falling off and getting lost. That is a VERY good investment. If you aren't prepared to do that, then buy a box of 40 toewarmers, and stick one to the top of each sock before you squeeze your foot into the boot. DO NOT put them under your foot as the instructions say; that's going to be painful in ski boots. If neither of those tactics is not sufficient to give you warm feet, buy Boot Gloves sized to fit your boots. They keep the wind out and hold in that warmth that the bootwarmers or heaters add. Warm feet make for a happy skier.

If you haven't bought boots yet, be sure to read this before buying.

http://www.epicski.com/a/boot-fitting-which-boot-will-work-for-me

Read it carefully, print it out, and take it with you to the ski shop. If the bootfitter does not do all the things this article says to do, walk out. You need boots whose shells are very very uncomfortable snug at the start. If you get boots too big, you'll end up cranking the buckles down tight and that will cut off circulation in the boots making your toes freeze. Too-big-boots are very common; they make the feet freezie and the skier miserable.

Welcome to the best winter obsession ever!
 

SKIQUATTRO

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the chemical heat packs for toes dont work as they need air to keep the heat going, a ski boot is pretty air tight..
 

SKIQUATTRO

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Liqidfeet....I have Reynaud's syndrome as well...taking Nifedical ( a calcium channel blocker. It works by relaxing and widening blood vessels so blood can flow more easily) has helped tremendously...prescrip from your Doc
 

LiquidFeet

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the chemical heat packs for toes dont work as they need air to keep the heat going, a ski boot is pretty air tight..

Worked for me for 4 years. Granted, these little bags are fickle - sometimes they get too hot and other times don't do much. It depends on the amount of air in there, and who knows what else. Still, they did the trick for me. The Hottronics are better, and more dependable.

Thanks for the info on the Nifedical. I'll check it out.
 

wa-loaf

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How about a full bib skipants. Those should be easier to find and give a lot of coverage. Definitely get a set of heaters for your boots, even pair them with boot gloves to get extra toasty.
 
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