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Are you at..where you want to be

kingslug

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Have you reached a point in your ability that you feel you cant go past?
My trip to MRG got me thinking about this. Ive done some seriouse, to me at least,lines that had seriouse fall consequences. Now that im a regular to N VT..im wondering how much farther i can go. Its totaly different than the west where the lines are wide, huge in most places, the glades are open, etc. Pics like this:
20180320_145234.jpg
I find amazing..yes thats past paradise. So much more interesting than watching the stars drop Alaska lines..not that that isnt cool to watch but this stuff is right in front of you...
Thoughts?
And if anyone goes back there again..gopro if you have one..it would be very interesting to watch.
 

BenedictGomez

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I could definitely improve my moguls (especially steep moguls) and tree skiing.
 

bdfreetuna

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keep the faith
Mainly focusing on improving technique for more enjoyment and lower impact on the body. High school days were more about hucking cliffs for fun.

Steeps out west give me vertigo due to lack of trees, at least the open bowls. If there's a few trees around that changes everything, I need to have at least something in my peripheral vision pointing upright.

Places like MRG, Stowe, Jay, Sugarloaf, Smuggs, Magic etc I still find somewhat challenging depending on the conditions so I don't think I'll ever "outgrow" the East, nor do I intend to.
 

kingslug

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Me too..ive been going out west for 20 years and it didnt prepare me for eastern tree skiing. Dropped little chute at Baldy ..did nothing but scared the hell out of me..never again. Theres so much more i want to do..at 53 the clock is ticking..problem is that mistakes in the woods can be fatal..no room in there..but thats where its at up north.guess ill just slowly work my way in there..its the acceleration that i cant control enough..the good tree skiers just run through there...scares the hell out of me to hit a tree.
 

Scruffy

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Every skier ( even WC, or Extreme comp skiers ) can improve within a personal range (where the top end of the range gets harder to obtain), until age mitigates that range, and even that is subjective of the individual.
 

kingslug

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I skied with a guide in whistler..84 years old and could just rip. Says i can do 40 pushups..can you..um..not without some pain. I would think around 90 it might be time to call it..all depends how you take care of yourself i guess.
 

Scruffy

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I skied with a guide in whistler..84 years old and could just rip. Says i can do 40 pushups..can you..um..not without some pain. I would think around 90 it might be time to call it..all depends how you take care of yourself i guess.

I hope to be skiing on my 100th BD, then I'll evaluated things :p
 

drjeff

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These posts got me thinking, at what age does the average skier "retire" due to age rather than desire?

Don't think there's an average for that. For every old retired skier there's a personal story as to why they hung it up.

Probably also is a function of how much wear and tear ones body has accumulated over the years (both snow sports and non snow sports related...)

Myself, nearing 50, and with almost 40 seasons under my skiing career belt, is noticing that I am scaling it back just a touch, and taking more time to enjoy my time on the hill rather than constantly push myself to do more, the last couple of seasons... I think some of that is because physically I feel good, and want to be one of those 80 year olds out on the hill 30+ years from now, and that's likely going to take some big picture, planning to do everything possible in my power to make it happen....
 

BenedictGomez

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Don't think there's an average for that. For every old retired skier there's a personal story as to why they hung it up.

But there literally is an average, which I'm sure people who handle demographics for the ski industry are keenly aware of. That's what I'm curious about.

Were I to spitball, I'd put it at early to mid 60s? I think skiers in general skew older, but there's certainly an age above which I dont see too many people in the lift lines with me regardless of where I'm skiing. I think that age is something like 60. Keep in mind, most people generally arent going to "know" when they can no longer ski, it will probably just "happen" that they sadly come to realize they cant anymore.
 

Vaughn

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Agree on the tree skiing. I've done Kinsman and some other glades but I don't enjoy it as I'm not that good at it. I'm 50 and have an active life with kids and really don't want to miss time spend doing other things due to injury pushing it in the woods. The payoff just isn't there.

Like so many other middle-aged people, I'm more and more intrigued with backcountry - not the stuff like extreme Tuckeman headwall runs but more like hiking up Moosilauke then skiing down it, etc... I.e. increase the 'adventure' aspect without amplifying the risk.
 

bdfreetuna

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.its the acceleration that i cant control enough..the good tree skiers just run through there...scares the hell out of me to hit a tree.

If conditions are good I like to keep the tail loose in the trees. Schmering is considered bad technique on the groomers, and sub-optimal on moguls, but it's the only way I know to be constantly able to modulate the "brakes" and be ready to hocky stop in an instant if a tree comes out of nowhere.
 

Siliconebobsquarepants

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Like so many other middle-aged people, I'm more and more intrigued with backcountry - not the stuff like extreme Tuckeman headwall runs but more like hiking up Moosilauke then skiing down it, etc... I.e. increase the 'adventure' aspect without amplifying the risk.

As I get older I've slowed down and enjoy quality over quantity . My most memorable ski run is BC Poconos 13-14 Winter.
managed to ski a line I had been looking at for 20yrs!. Being the first descent ...I think? was a rewarding part but just getting there and enjoying the scenery without other people wizzing by is priceless.IMG_2694.jpg
 

tumbler

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I love the woods but know my limits. I don't need or want to do the gnarly stuff so I'll push it in the stuff I'm comfortable with. I don't find the single track roller coaster down the super steep enjoyable. I prefer more of the glade where I can choose a path and move around. Out west I was amazed at how well me and family skied the steeps from the first run. I think it was from learning in the east trees and making quick reactive turns.
 

deadheadskier

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I was probably at my peak in terms of my off piste abilities in my mid-20s. I was skiing 80-100 days a year and just better practiced at skiing technical lines and more willing to huck stuff. I'd ski moguls much faster then too.

Combination of self preservation due to age and just not skiing enough to have my skills as sharp as they once were has me dialed well back. I'll still ski any marked trail in the East and most of the off map stuff with little worry; I'll just take it a bit slower and often opt for the ladies tee on drops in tight locations.

Carving I'm probably as good as I've ever been and probably could get better at it still. I spend much more of my days carving groomers now (probably 50/50) vs skiing ungroomed stuff. In my 20s a groomer was only an avenue to and from the natural stuff.

Sent from my XT1635-01 using AlpineZone mobile app
 

BenedictGomez

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As I get older I've slowed down and enjoy quality over quantity . My most memorable ski run is BC Poconos 13-14 Winter.
managed to ski a line I had been looking at for 20yrs!. Being the first descent ...I think? was a rewarding part but just getting there and enjoying the scenery without other people wizzing by is priceless.View attachment 23606

Is that the Del Water Gap area?
 
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