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Backcountry and Side-country tips, tactics and locations. Where are you looking? Where are you going? or Where have you been?

kendo

Active member
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Mar 7, 2019
Messages
352
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43
I'll add, and this some my hiking pack
Epipen
Resuscitation kit
Knife or two
Zip ties
Para cord
Super glue
Compass
Clothes a spare of everything including boots
Spikes
Lighters

I'll stop there for now

I'll add (anytime skiing solo)...

Fox 40 whistle
 
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Joined
Jan 25, 2015
Messages
173
Points
18
I'll add, and this some my hiking pack
Epipen
Resuscitation kit
Knife or two
Zip ties
Para cord
Super glue
Compass
Clothes a spare of everything including boots
Spikes
Lighters

I'll stop there for now
Epicenter, no. Some Benadryl yes
resuscitation kit? You mean an airway mask for cpr?
super glue? Are you field sealing wounds? Not my course of action
clothes, only spares I bring are gloves and maybe ball cap/hat sunglasses/goggles. Everything else should work as a system so you use it all if an emergency occurs and you are waylaid.
 

ThatGuy

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Feb 10, 2021
Messages
1,609
Points
113
Location
America
Even if you’re not going in the backcountry I think you should always at least have a compass, whistle, power brick to charge things and a lighter on you
 
Joined
Jan 25, 2015
Messages
173
Points
18
Never carry a brick and although I carry a compass and familiar with it, never used one in the wilds.

Know first aid and take the minimum to make it work. Bring enough clothing to keep yourself warm through an extended down time. Bring at least one headlamp. Carry extra food.

sidecountry stashes are usually more guarded secrets than backcountry.

stream beds can be dangerous. Sharp drops, logs, open water, terrain traps. They scare me the most in the NE, but still ski them
 

ThatGuy

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Feb 10, 2021
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America
Also if you do plan on going Sidecountry/Backcountry or even deep into resort woods you should be able to read topo maps and have a good sense of direction. Gaia GPS and FatMap are you friends
 
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zyk

Active member
Joined
Feb 10, 2010
Messages
415
Points
43

Epicenter, no. Some Benadryl yes
resuscitation kit? You mean an airway mask for cpr?
super glue? Are you field sealing wounds? Not my course of action
clothes, only spares I bring are gloves and maybe ball cap/hat sunglasses/goggles. Everything else should work as a system so you use it all if an emergency occurs and you are waylaid.
Epipen if you need one and don't have one it can be very very bad. If you have one it is not good but it buys time. It is more of a summer thing but my kit doesn't change much. Hiking, skiing, event work. Not much changes. Benadryl big fan. First line of defense for me.

Superglue, duct tape, zip ties can fix gear temporarily.

If I'm close to home I probably don't need some things but it's easier to build a bag and always bring it along.
 

crank

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 3, 2005
Messages
1,360
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63
Location
CT
First time I skied the Dip at Jay Peak I scoped it out beforehand using google earth, which is still a thing. It just gave me more of a comfort level for going farther out from te resort than I had been before.
 

raisingarizona

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Nov 19, 2014
Messages
1,083
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83
I always have a light pair of gloves (like spring skiing gloves) for my climbing and winter gloves for everything else. It’s awesome to take the sweaty gloves off after a skin and put warm dry gloves on for the actual skiing.

I think it’s worth mentioning that you should always be a step ahead of body temperature regulation. Don’t ever let yourself become too hot or too cold. Sometimes it’s in your best interest to slow down to not become sweaty. Sweat can kill ya. Backcountry skiing is as much about this and managing layers as it is snow safety imho.

And ffs, secure all gear while transitioning in a windy ridge top or a steep slope with packed snow! I’ve seen a lot of people lose gear in those situations. It’s a real bummer to have to call it early because you lost a glove and now have become a liability for the group.

And practice your damn transitions. Don’t be the guy that’s figuring out his gear for the first time with your touring group. It’s inconsiderate if everyone else is constantly steps ahead and waiting on you because you haven’t taken the time to figure out how to use your gear until you are in the field.
 
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zyk

Active member
Joined
Feb 10, 2010
Messages
415
Points
43
Also if you do plan on going Sidecountry/Backcountry or even deep into resort woods you should be able to read topo maps and have a good sense of direction. Gaia GPS and FatMap are you friends
Map memory is important. Read maps, understand maps, memorize maps, bring maps. I don't have a phone so GPS does me no good.
 

Hawk

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Joined
Nov 22, 2016
Messages
2,479
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Location
Mad River Valley / MA
What? If you show up to ski the back country and don't know how to use your gear then maybe you should not be in the back country just yet. I have never had this happen. Then again I only ski with accompished guides and friends. Seeing someone struggle out of the gate would be a big red flag because once you enter the woods, they became your responcibility.
And practice your damn transitions. Don’t be the guy that’s figuring out his gear for the first time with your touring group. It’s inconsiderate if everyone else is constantly steps ahead and waiting on you because you haven’t taken the time to figure out how to use your gear until you are in the field.
 

VTSkiBike

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
60
Points
18
Location
Sugarbush & MRG
Yes, spend a lot of time sorting out your touring gear in your warm living room, not at the top of a skin track in freezing temps.
 
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