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Dog Rescued on Mt. Bierstadt - Animal Cruelty or Horrible Mistake?

MadMadWorld

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http://denver.cbslocal.com/2012/08/15/dog-rescued-after-8-days-on-mt-bierstadt/

I am somewhat torn on this one. My feeling is you shouldn't bring up anything you can't carry down. And while he did make an attempt to initially rescue the dog, he gave up and didn't try to do anything more after the fact to save his dog. Amazing job by the guys over at 14ers.com for saving that dogs life. My feeling is that he doesn't deserve to get his dog back but shouldn't be prosecuted for animal cruelty.

My other point of this post is to ask others, what precautions do you take to ensure that you and your dog make it home safely whether hiking or in the backcountry?
 

Puck it

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Drop him back off at the summit with no food or water and scrape up his feet(take his shoes) and see what he does. That is all I would do!!!!!!
 

Abubob

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He gave up the dog for legitimate reasons but never asked for help to retrieve him. Not to mention he doesn't chime in on the forum that rescued him until many days after. He without a doubt gave up the dog for dead. Fine. Let the rescuers have him.
 

MadMadWorld

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Drop him back off at the summit with no food or water and scrape up his feet(take his shoes) and see what he does. That is all I would do!!!!!!

We all have gotten into situations where we have misjudged a situation, but to just write the dog off after he and his friend got to safety is sickening to me as a dog owner. Whether it's human or dog you never leave someone behind especially in that weather on a 13,000 ft peak with little shelter and no food. I personally would have stayed with my dog and sent the other person for help so SAR would have been forced to send people in.
 

JimG.

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I remember a story over on First Tracks about a seasoned BC skier whose dog loved going with him.

They set off an avi and the dog was buried. Both had transceivers. In a selfless act, he risked his own life and rescued his dog.

I remember thinking that story was a good example of why it is not a good idea to bring dogs into high risk situations like that.
 

MadMadWorld

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I remember a story over on First Tracks about a seasoned BC skier whose dog loved going with him.

They set off an avi and the dog was buried. Both had transceivers. In a selfless act, he risked his own life and rescued his dog.

I remember thinking that story was a good example of why it is not a good idea to bring dogs into high risk situations like that.

Most dogs do fine in the backcountry. If you plan to bring your dog into the backcountry the most important thing to teach your dog is not to run and chase behind you because he can injure himself on your skis and is more likely to trigger a slide. I tend to be a little more conservative when choosing snow conditions and terrain.I have taken my 5 year old Yellow Lab with me on multiple backcountry adventures including the Chic Chocs and the High Peaks. I got him a pack that he carries his food, water, first aid supplies, and of course....tennis balls. He gets so excited when he sees me break out his pack. He runs along side me and I have never had an issue.

The other moral of that story is that you never go out into the backcountry without another two legged skiing companion!
 

JimG.

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Most dogs do fine in the backcountry. If you plan to bring your dog into the backcountry the most important thing to teach your dog is not to run and chase behind you because he can injure himself on your skis and is more likely to trigger a slide. I tend to be a little more conservative when choosing snow conditions and terrain.I have taken my 5 year old Yellow Lab with me on multiple backcountry adventures including the Chic Chocs and the High Peaks. I got him a pack that he carries his food, water, first aid supplies, and of course....tennis balls. He gets so excited when he sees me break out his pack. He runs along side me and I have never had an issue.

The other moral of that story is that you never go out into the backcountry without another two legged skiing companion!

I understand and I'm not criticizing anyone regarding this issue. I can see how people and especially the dogs would enjoy doing this.

This is an interesting discussion...you mentioned always bringing another person along. Here's a theoretical situation...2 people and a dog go BC and trigger a slide. All are wearing tranceivers. The dog and one person are buried. The remaining person is OK and begins a search and rescue effort. After 15 minutes that person zeroes in on one of the victims. It's the dog and he's OK. But by the time they locate the other person and dig them out it's too late.

Comments?
 

MadMadWorld

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I understand and I'm not criticizing anyone regarding this issue. I can see how people and especially the dogs would enjoy doing this.

This is an interesting discussion...you mentioned always bringing another person along. Here's a theoretical situation...2 people and a dog go BC and trigger a slide. All are wearing tranceivers. The dog and one person are buried. The remaining person is OK and begins a search and rescue effort. After 15 minutes that person zeroes in on one of the victims. It's the dog and he's OK. But by the time they locate the other person and dig them out it's too late.

Comments?

Yea I completely agree with that. I draw the line there. My dog does not wear a transceiver for that exact reason. He has however learned how to deploy his airbag though in case of emergency lol
 

JimG.

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Yea I completely agree with that. I draw the line there. My dog does not wear a transceiver for that exact reason. He has however learned how to deploy his airbag though in case of emergency lol

That is the response I was hoping for...I would feel comfortable with you in those types of situations. I also know that you would dig through miles of snow to try to save your dog if he was buried without the transceiver.
 

jlboyell

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as a dog owner, i dont think i could leave him, but if i had too, id have to turn around with help immediately, not just assume he was dead and leave him. i think probably no charges but no way he gets the dog back. the people who rescued her deserve her and she deserves them.
 

ski stef

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I heard through the grapevine that search and rescue spent a lot of time taking some dogs off another 14er recently. Pretty much they want to put word of mouth out there not to take your dogs up 14ers anymore. I hiked Bierstadt with my 2 dogs the other day and had no problem with them. Lots of concerns from fellow hikers about their pads on the rocks, considering the article that this thread is about, but these dogs have been on rough terrain since they were puppies. I'm assuming most of the issue is that people come out West with their dogs and want to hike with them but the dogs haven't been properly introduced to that type of shale and walking on loose rocks/boulders. I will continue taking my dogs on 14ers that are Class 1 and Class 2. Once it gets above their I will leave them at home. Felt bad for this pup.. Bierstadt is a pretty wide open trail to the top. I'm surprised he couldn't have helped the dog get down.
 

MadMadWorld

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I heard through the grapevine that search and rescue spent a lot of time taking some dogs off another 14er recently. Pretty much they want to put word of mouth out there not to take your dogs up 14ers anymore. I hiked Bierstadt with my 2 dogs the other day and had no problem with them. Lots of concerns from fellow hikers about their pads on the rocks, considering the article that this thread is about, but these dogs have been on rough terrain since they were puppies. I'm assuming most of the issue is that people come out West with their dogs and want to hike with them but the dogs haven't been properly introduced to that type of shale and walking on loose rocks/boulders. I will continue taking my dogs on 14ers that are Class 1 and Class 2. Once it gets above their I will leave them at home. Felt bad for this pup.. Bierstadt is a pretty wide open trail to the top. I'm surprised he couldn't have helped the dog get down.

Absolutely. Dogs need a progression just like humans as far as climbing goes. I think I would be offended if someone told me to take my dog off a mountain if I have taken every precaution for myself and the dog. Throw some boots on the dog and get hm used to moving around in them goes a long way. People don't realize that its not just the sharpness of the rocks but also the heat that can cause damage to the pads of their paws
 
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