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How Many NH 4000 Footers Have You Bagged?

How Many NH 4000 Footers Have You Bagged?


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    18
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Cornbread

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I've done Jefferson from Caps Ridge Trail. That's actually the only Presi I've done. Almost all of my focus has been on the Pemi and the stuff right around it, although I've still quite quite a few yet to do in this region. My reason for wanting to do Owls Head in the Winter was actually so I could make good time on skis going in from the Kanc instead of having a long death march. Someone (Climber456) on an AMC board recommended this, and I'd been looking for a good Winter trip that would involve skiing. Plus, I've heard about a deep water crossing that must be done when going in from the South, so I figured it would be easier to do if it were frozen. Any comments on this plan are welcomed.
 

Mike P.

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Owl's Head

I'm not a skier, but that is good advice. The other alternative for missing the crossings is a bushwhack from the Black Pond trail. from there it's almost a due north trip keeping brook to right & F-Ridge to left until you get to later crossing when it's much smaller.

For skiing across those brooks I'd be tempted to say mid-winter is best as I would not want to fall in. (Winter brook crossings are my personal paranoia, especially early or late in the season.)

I know snowshoe users do teh bushwhack, I'm not up on skiing so I do not know if the bushwhack would be a hindrance or a help, a question getting ski advice for (from AMC's site would be my best guess or VFTT) when the time comes.
 

Max

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Working on the 4th

Hi. I'm new to this forum, but have been backpacking since the mid 70's. I've finished the 4000 footers 3 times and have 17 more to go for my 4th trip around. I kept going after the first loop when my son got an interest in hiking them all. We did his first 4000 footer (Liberty) when he was 5, camping at Liberty Springs and making it a 2 day trip. He finally finished up on Carrigain when he was 11 years old. Over the years I've managed to complete the 100 highest as well. I've been away from hiking for a few years, but just started getting back into it. My pace sure has slowed down! :D
 
P

porcupine

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I've hiked all 48, many of them multiple times/ seasons. Many inspirations started me on the endeavor, here's a few.
A friend introduced me to the club, with the first hike being Carter Ridge peaks. I found it to be a great inspiration to spread hikes around the White's to places I might not otherwise visit. On almost every one of these hikes I've seen ponds, bogs. <4000' peaks, waterfalls, cliffs, caves and cruised by numerous potential camping spots that I retuned to visit later. The 4000 footer 'goal' had the subsequent effect of providing a White Mtn. education, not only of place,but also skills.
When I started the 48 I was recovering from divorce. The therapy provided by committment to this goal was extremely beneficial. The personal development is a book in and of itself.
I'm a patch collector, so if I wanted this one on my wall.....................
Forest and Crag should be a required textbook for Northeast children.

PS I saved King Ravine up Adams for last.
 

Jayne

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peak bagging etc

After many years of hiking (30), I decided to go for the 48 4k's three years ago. I thought that I would hike many places and see many things that I might not have if I didn't pursue that goal. The other driving force is I have a competive side that continues to push me. Now that I have one left, Carrigan, which I hope to complete next weekend, I have this feeling of such achievement, it's incredible! When I'm done,next summer, I will do some of the peaks over that supposedly have great views ( I was socked in). Then on to VT and Maine, but probably not pursue any of them in different seasons or in 89.2 hours or any of those other goals. I hike for the beauty, sense of accomplishment, and most of all my comfort level. I won't hike with people who go to fast for my pace or hike in inclement weather. Enjoyment is my key motivator. I love the mountains!
 
R

RJ

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My wife and I also started the 48 three years ago and will conclude our little adventure on Carrigain on the 19th of October. Although we have climbed a number of the 48 in previous years, we decided to wipe the slate clean and start anew. I had smoked for 35+ years and I needed to quit so doing the 48 was a nice incentive for remaining smoke-free.
 

Jayne

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RJ,
I still have my favorites which I have done many times, but some of the remote ones have been my favorites. I'm not so sure I would have done those if there wasn't a "list". I don't tend to read my hikers bible aka White Mt Guide from front to back....so it was a bit of an initiative. Also, the 50 Hikes in the White Mts and 50 More Hikes In the White Mts has some great hikes. Some of my trail choices were made from those books, and they were more interesting and less crowded than the typical trails. Give them a try. :D
 
R

RJ

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I too feel that if it wasn't for the list, we might not have climbed certain mountains. For instance, Hale, Waumbek, North & South Kinsman, and Tecumseh are ones that I do not need to repeat. However, the Presidentials, Franconia Ridge, The Bonds, and the Wildcats & Carters are all mountains that I will climb for years to come.

Once we complete the list on the 19th our hiking will not end. There are a number of trails that I want to hike that have always intrigued me, but I didn't have the time to hike. For example, Six Husband, Castle Trail, King's Ravine Trail just to name a few. I also plan on doing a one-day Presidential Traverse next year before I get too long in the tooth. We both plan to hike until we have to give up the ghost.
 

Jayne

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I'm sorry , "too long in the tooth" and "give up the ghost" - I get the general idea what that means but I've not heard those sayings...enlighten me.
YES- Castle Trail is definetly on my list ( that is the one to Jefferson, correct?) I am not sure I want to do the presidential traverse...I would have to work up to that. I never did many hikes around 10 miles rt until hiking the 48. It took me a little bit to get used to, but then after Owls Head and the 16 M trek....one foot in front of the other.... Maybe I will think about it next summer. :beer:
 
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RJ

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"Too long in the tooth or long in the tooth" probably comes from the mastodons or other mammals that have tusks. It basically means that you are getting on in years.

To give up the ghost means to die. I'm not sure of the etymology of the term.

I have to admit before embarking on the 48, I was a 4 or 5-mile hiker at best. My wife and her girlfriends would do Bataan Death Marches, while I would remain at camp. After quitting smoking, I was able to join her on the longer hikes and now love a good ten-hour hike. Our most strenuous hike had to be our Madison/Adams loop that we did last year. It took us ten-hours to complete and we were two whipped puppies at the end. Although Owl's Head was long (18 miles) I didn't find it all that bad. Most of the trail is flat until you hit the slide.

Another side effect of the 48 is that we both returned to backpacking. I use to backpack in my 20's, but gave it up for some reason or another that escapes me at the moment. We did the Bonds and the Wildcats & Carters as backpacking trips. We plan to continue our backpacking adventures next spring & summer.
 

Jayne

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If you haven't been to Baxter State Park yet it's a must do. The loop that goes over Knife's Edge and Baxter Peak and back to Roaring Brook campground is 10 miles mostly difficult. Even the walk out from Chimney Pond is not steep but rocky so you never get any flat cushy ground- BUT- well worth the trip!
The backpacking has been fun and even the hut to hut thing is an adventure. The Bond Cliffs- so far my favorite spot. I can't wait to camp at Guyot next summer and see the sunrise and sunset from Bond. There is always something to look forward to.
 
R

RJ

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We are planning on a backpacking trip to Baxter next summer. We will probably camp for one or two nights and day hike and then do a two night backpacking trip. I've always wanted to do the knife-edge, even though I'm not a big fan of heights. I figure if I can do that, I can do anything.

I also loved the Bonds. Unfortunately, the weather was less than ideal. The hike in was in clouds and fog and it rained all night. We were able to get a few glimpses of the surround peaks before hiking out the next day.

I usually take a week off in June by myself and after doing the traverse, I will probably do a two or three-night trip to either the Pemi or the Presidentials. A friend and I did a four-day trip last year from Thornton (near Waterville Valley) to Mt Washington. It was a fun trip albeit wet because it rained for two of the four days. I will try to talk him into coming with me in June.
 

Greg

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RJ said:
"Too long in the tooth or long in the tooth" probably comes from the mastodons or other mammals that have tusks. It basically means that you are getting on in years.

To give up the ghost means to die. I'm not sure of the etymology of the term.

Here is more info on Giving up the ghost and a discussion on getting Long in the tooth. Pretty cool Web site. Enjoy! :spin:
 

pedxing

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I was at 17 when I posted on this thread last June. I've now reached 40 (thanks mostly to hiking the New Hampshire AT). Still remaining:

12. N. Twin Mtn. 4761'
13. Carrigain 4700'
23. Field 4340'
29. Willey 4285'
33. Cabot 4170'
37. Hale 4054'
39. Tom 4051'
46. Waumbek 4006'

I'll hike North Twin (the highest of the remaining peaks) as park of Flags on the 48 in two weeks.
 
R

RJ

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Pedxing, you can knock off Tom, Willey, and Field in one fell swoop by doing a loop. It's a nice ridge and an easy hike. Cabot and Waumbek you can also do as a loop, but it will be a long day and require a car spot.
 

pedxing

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RJ: Thanks. I am thinking of WIlley, Field and Tom as a day hike loop. Cabot and Waumbek might be part of a nice w/e trip?

Carrigain might be a good place to finish (is that where you finished?), somehow I can't contemplate that hike without Vose Spur crying out to me for a bushwack.
 

Stephen

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Did numbers 5 and 6 this past weekend, Monroe and Washington, respectively.

I'm saving Wildcat for the end... Gonna try and get my family to tram up to celebrate at the peak.

-T
 

smitty77

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Finishing on Carrigain

Pedxing,

I finished on Carrigain on December 3, 1988 with about 6" of snow on the ground. It was a wonderful hike that wasn't too strenuous and allowed me to enjoy my accomplishment without being exhausted. The views were excellent. I highly recommend finishing on this one if you have the option.

Smitty
 

Jayne

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Yay for Carragain!

Pedxing,
I agree, Carragain is a beautiful way to finish. The signal Ridge trail is fantastic! I finished last October on that trail/peak. So worth it. Save the bushwack for another time.
 
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