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legalize it already

snoseek

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Oh and yes a full report DMC, have a kind trip. I'll be traveling through soon. Can't wait to get back to the land of plenty!
 

ScottySkis

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This is actually kind of a big deal IMO. This ought to make lots of politicians a little less nervous about decriminalization or even full legalization.

If the Fed is for for real and going to stop closing down full legal shops in states were it is legal, and hopefully DEA puts stop on arresting people for using a cannabis then this could be huge. +420 :):):):thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::beer::cool::cool::):):):thumbup:
 

RootDKJ

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Huck_It_Baby

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For those in favor, would you want to do it infront of say your 5yr old kid? (And then try and explain to them that smoking ANYTHING isn't healthy??

If the answer is "no" then why bother in the 1st place??

You don't have to smoke to gain benefits, medical or recreational. THC can be extracted and ingested without the negative health side effects.



Sent from my SCH-I545 using AlpineZone mobile app
 

RootDKJ

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Hope is kindled.

http://benswann.com/breaking-did-the-federal-government-just-legalize-marijuana/


As states continue to nullify federal laws against marijuana and hemp, the federal government has been faced with an important question. It’s been more than 75 years, and marijuana and hemp still remain illegal. Never mind the total lack of reasoning behind the federal government’s ban. Is it time to end the law?

Less than 24 hours ago, it all came crashing down. According to the Associated Press, the justice department said that states can allow citizens to use the drug, license people to grow it and allow them to purchase it in stores. As long as the drug is kept away from the black market, children and federal property– It’s a go!

According to Mike Maharrey, national communications director for the Tenth Amendment Center:

“The genie is out of the bottle and she won’t ever go back in. The feds have lost and they know it. No matter how Holder and the DEA couch their words in an attempt to maintain an illusion of control, state actions continue to effectively nullify these unconstitutional marijuana laws.“


When asked if the federal government just essentially legalized marijuana Maharrey responded:

“The announcement makes it clear the feds have no will to fight the states on weed. They can call it an “illegal drug” all they want, but if they can’t, or won’t, stop people from using marijuana, their “law” means nothing.”

The recent surge in nullification has sent states fighting against the federal government on pot use. It would seem that the federal government just gave up. A major victory for the states- no doubt.
 

RootDKJ

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http://tenthamendmentcenter.com/2013/08/30/nullification-win-holder-doj-back-down/#more-22586

Nullification Win! Holder, DOJ Back Down

Nullification works.

James Madison wrote in Federalist 46 that refusing to cooperate with unconstitutional federal acts would create “serious impediments” and “obstructions which the federal government would hardly be willing to encounter.”

On Thursday, Eric Holder’s Department of Justice essentially backed down in the face of marijuana legalization by popular vote in both Colorado and Washington state.

The DOJ said that it would not challenge the new state laws. A DOJ memo indicates that as long as Washington and Colorado create “tightly regulated” markets that address eight federal “enforcement priorities,” it will not interfere with state laws. Federal enforcement priorities include preventing distribution of marijuana to minors, keeping drug money out of the hands of criminal enterprises, preventing diversion of marijuana into states where it remains illegal, preventing trafficking, preventing drug related violence, preventing drugged driving, keeping marijuana cultivation off public lands, and stopping marijuana possession on federal property.

The DOJ couched its announcement in language meant to create the impression that it remains in control, even though it’s not.

In a new memorandum outlining the policy, the Department makes clear that marijuana remains an illegal drug under the Controlled Substances Act and that federal prosecutors will continue to aggressively enforce this statute.

The announcement makes it clear the feds have no will to fight the states on weed. They can call it an “illegal drug” all they want, but if they can’t, or won’t, stop people from using marijuana, their “law” means nothing.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper released a statement Thursday.

Amendment 64 put Colorado in conflict with federal law. Today’s announcement shows the federal government is respecting the will of Colorado voters.

Don’t for a minute think that the feds backed off because Holder and company are soft on weed. The Obama administration has spent more on enforcement measures and conducted more marijuana raids than any president in U.S. history. But when the people of the states resist in big numbers – the feds lose – just like Madison envisioned.

And the people do not support the unconstitutional federal war on marijuana. A Pew Research poll shows 59 percent of Democrats and 57 percent of Republicans think the feds should back off enforcing federal drug laws in states with legalized marijuana. Thursday’s DOJ announcement reveals the power of the people working through their states. It does indeed create “obstructions which the federal government would hardly be willing to encounter.”

In fact, the battle against federal marijuana laws started back in the 90s when California voters approved Proposition 215, or the Compassionate Use Act, legalizing medical marijuana. The Supreme Court ruled that the feds could indeed regulate six plants grown in your back yard in the 2005 Raich v. Gonzalez decision, but that didn’t stop the momentum. Despite sporadic DEA attempts to crush the movement, today, 21 states have ignored the Supreme Court’s opinion and legalized medical marijuana programs.

And now we have the feds essentially telling Washington and Colorado, “you go right ahead and ignore federal ‘law.’ It’s the law! But we won’t enforce it.”

The genie is out of the bottle and she won’t ever go back in. The feds have lost and they know it. No matter how Holder and the DEA couch their words in an attempt to maintain an illusion of control, state actions continue to effectively nullify these unconstitutional marijuana “laws.”

Make no mistake, the entire war on drugs, including marijuana prohibition, rests on the same authority as all of the other undeclared wars waged by the federal government in the last 75 years.

None.

The constitution delegates no authority for the federal government to wage drug war. Drug policy should rightly remain an object left to the states and the people. Doubt this? Then ask yourself why it took a constitutional amendment to enact federal prohibition of alcohol.

In his original draft of the Kentucky Resolutions of 1798, Thomas Jefferson wrote, “Where powers are assumed which have not been delegated, a nullification of the act is the rightful remedy.” Washington and Colorado, along with all of the states now running medical marijuana programs did just that. They exercised their will, ignored the federal mandates and acted with the support of their citizens.

And it’s working.

Nullification Win: DOJ Backs Down on Marijuana Legalization by Tenth Amendment Center

About Mike Maharrey
 

ScottySkis

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Were getting their, slow yes. cannabis is a miracle plant. Most people who use it for medical reasons don't get want to be high. Which is possible with strains with no thc and it really is great for people with seizures it totally stops it. It also is such a great antidepressants and people who have cancer can use this instead of prescription addiction pills that are now officially killing more people then heroin and cocaine combined. I can't believe it has been illegal for last 75 years because of lies from our government so they could have their departments paid for and lying the public making this miracle herb into a big lie. People think of people who use it as hippies but I know so many different classes of people who use it and don't talk about because of it shaming , finally seeing the light.
 

RootDKJ

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Cops freak out over Holder/DOJ cannabis memo. Be sure to ignore the bolded section as to why they fight "we the people" so violently.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/30/police-eric-holder-marijuana-_n_3846518.html

Police Groups Furiously Protest Eric Holder's Marijuana Policy Announcement

WASHINGTON -- A broad coalition of law enforcement officers who have spent the past three decades waging an increasingly militarized drug war that has failed to reduce drug use doesn't want to give up the fight.


Organizations that include sheriffs, narcotics officers and big-city police chiefs slammed Attorney General Eric Holder in a joint letter Friday, expressing "extreme disappointment" at his announcement that the Department of Justice would allow Colorado and Washington to implement state laws that legalized recreational marijuana for adults.


If there had been doubt about how meaningful Holder's move was, the fury reflected in the police response eliminates it. The role of law enforcement is traditionally understood to be limited to enforcing laws, but police organizations have become increasingly powerful political actors, and lashed out at Holder for not consulting sufficiently before adopting the new policy.


"It is unacceptable that the Department of Justice did not consult our organizations -- whose members will be directly impacted -- for meaningful input ahead of this important decision," the letter reads. "Our organizations were given notice just thirty minutes before the official announcement was made public and were not given the adequate forum ahead of time to express our concerns with the Department’s conclusion on this matter. Simply 'checking the box' by alerting law enforcement officials right before a decision is announced is not enough and certainly does not show an understanding of the value the Federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement partnerships bring to the Department of Justice and the public safety discussion."


The missive was signed by the Major County Sheriffs’ Association, the National Sheriffs’ Association,
the Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the National Narcotic Officers Associations’ Coalition, the Major Cities Chiefs Police Association and the Police Executive Research Forum.


Law enforcement, the police groups said, "becomes infinitely harder for our front-line men and women given the Department’s position."


The Justice Department declined to respond.


Local law enforcement agencies rely heavily on the drug war for funding. Police departments are often able to keep a large portion of the assets they seize during drug raids, even if charges are never brought. And federal grants for drug war operations make up a sizable portion of local law enforcement funding.


The letter warns that marijuana can cause suicidal thoughts, impairs driving and is a "gateway drug." The missive does not, however, address the failure of law enforcement generally to reduce drug use, even while tripling the number of people behind bars. Instead, the police warn that liberalizing pot laws will lead to an increase in crime.


"The decision will undoubtedly have grave unintended consequences, including a reversal of the declining crime rates that we as law enforcement practitioners have spent more than a decade maintaining," the officers write.


Worse, they warn, more states are likely to follow Washington and Colorado.


"The failure of the Department of Justice to challenge state policies that clearly contradict Federal law is both unacceptable and unprecedented. The failure of the Federal government to act in this matter is an open invitation to other states to legalize marijuana in defiance of federal law," they write.

This is how you know you are winning. When the agents of The State, resort to emotion and avoid facts to justify their jobs.
 

deadheadskier

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"The decision will undoubtedly have grave unintended consequences, including a reversal of the declining crime rates that we as law enforcement practitioners have spent more than a decade maintaining," the officers write.


interesting logic. eliminate a crime and suggest that crime rates will go up
 

dmc

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I can report back that Colorado is fine...
It's spreading out to the masses at the Phish concerts for sure. :) Which were really great btw... :)

By the time I fly out there for riding it will be legal for tourists to purchase.
The New Amsterdam with KILLER snowboarding and skiing..
 

ScottySkis

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Year in half ago I started this thread and for first time I feel positive about possibly if full legalization of this miracle plant maybe soon, I mean it should have never been illegal in the first place.:):beer:;)
 

ScottySkis

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I can report back that Colorado is fine...
It's spreading out to the masses at the Phish concerts for sure. :) Which were really great btw... :)

By the time I fly out there for riding it will be legal for tourists to purchase.
The New Amsterdam with KILLER snowboarding and skiing..

Glad you had fun out their DMC, I might have to drive from SLC to one of these shops next time I get out west.
 

dmc

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Glad you had fun out their DMC, I might have to drive from SLC to one of these shops next time I get out west.

Or just hit Colorado... they actually have great skiing there.... I actually prefer CO to UT myself...


You want to show how legalization is positive?
Spend $ in places that allow it...
 

JimG.

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Or just hit Colorado... they actually have great skiing there.... I actually prefer CO to UT myself...


You want to show how legalization is positive?
Spend $ in places that allow it...
Yes, vote with your $$.
 

dmc

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Cool thing that people have there are vape pens - loaded with "wax" or "oil"...

You can barely smell it and it's really potent... So I've been told..
They sold them on the "lot" before the Phish show..
 

Edd

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Sounds like Sophie's Choice for Scotty! Legal weed in CO or OMG, just the bestest, deepest, dry Utah pow! Pop quiz hotshot! What do you do? What do you do....
 

ScottySkis

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Sounds like Sophie's Choice for Scotty! Legal weed in CO or OMG, just the bestest, deepest, dry Utah pow! Pop quiz hotshot! What do you do? What do you do....

Well since my but is ass broke, go to Utah and ski cheaply, with cheap hotels and powder, and drive to Colorado ski one day there and drive stop at MJ shop. I love the idea of the portable Vap DMC and I never done the oil yet. I hear Utah is looking for medical Cannabis I saw article today so maybe it be legal their and everywhere soon so we can close the thread.
 

Edd

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Well since my but is ass broke, go to Utah and ski cheaply, with cheap hotels and powder, and drive to Colorado ski one day there and drive stop at MJ shop. I love the idea of the portable Vap DMC and I never done the oil yet. I hear Utah is looking for medical Cannabis I saw article today so maybe it be legal their and everywhere soon so we can close the thread.

Utah can barely come to grips with booze so don't hold your breath on legal weed. There's gotta be some cheap deals in CO for skiing.
 
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