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Lost Hiker in WMNF Found Dead

Abubob

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I'll answer my own question. This from further in the article -

Her pack was off, and her face was scraped and cut. Her headlamp was still in place.
“It looked like she got blown off the Star Lake trail,” Pelchat said. “A big gust of wind picked her up and blew her off the trail.”
 

Johnnyboy

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It was a terrible, albeit avoidable, tragedy. And the one year anniversary of a death is almost as difficult to deal with as one day after.[/QUOTE

Yes, an avoidable tragedy, but Kate live her script just as we all are living ours day to day. In case you are wondering if you are living yours, just look down at feet and check where you are. I thought of her this morning as I was out for an early walk in an ice storm. I love the ice and snow. You have a great quote as your signature line Abubob...reality minus expectations
 

Cannonball

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Yes, an avoidable tragedy, but Kate live her script just as we all are living ours day to day. In case you are wondering if you are living yours, just look down at feet and check where you are.

Boy is that depressing. (to me anyway). I'd hate to think that we are simply living a script. That seems to suggest that everything (including her tragedy) is actually unavoidable. I prefer to believe that there is no script and we are writing our history as we go with the decision we make.
 

Johnnyboy

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Boy is that depressing. (to me anyway). I'd hate to think that we are simply living a script. That seems to suggest that everything (including her tragedy) is actually unavoidable. I prefer to believe that there is no script and we are writing our history as we go with the decision we make.

I understand what you are saying. A turning point in my life was adding Trust. Trust answers all my questions. Pain, suffering, death are all inevitable at some point. I trust it has a purpose.
Much of my time in the mountains has been seeking higher meaning and understanding after plenty of personal pain, suffering, tragedy.
I've experienced the "third man factor" in the Whites when I was guided each and every move by a clear voice when I was in trouble over my head. Many mountaineers have experienced such benevolent guidance. Check out the website on the third man factor or the book.
We are all free to believe as we wish and think for ourselves. I prefer to add Trust to each and every move and believe in the order of things as viewed from high places. Of course we need to do what we can to avoid tragedy in the mountains and elsewhere but if we take the risks with good judgement and Trust, then we can also trust that the consequences are meant to be.
When I initially learned of Kate's death and her climbing plan for the day, I knew she had an overambitious plan, at least no way I could do that route in a day in winter or summer. So the consequences played out. And so it is...maybe it doesn't even matter what you or I think, believe or feel.
 

Abubob

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Of course we need to do what we can to avoid tragedy in the mountains and elsewhere but if we take the risks with good judgement and Trust, then we can also trust that the consequences are meant to be.
When I initially learned of Kate's death and her climbing plan for the day, I knew she had an overambitious plan, at least no way I could do that route in a day in winter or summer. So the consequences played out. And so it is...maybe it doesn't even matter what you or I think, believe or feel.
You're still talking about FATE. As if it doesn't matter what YOU decide. You are just following some unknown pre-described script?
 

Johnnyboy

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You're still talking about FATE. As if it doesn't matter what YOU decide. You are just following some unknown pre-described script?

I follow my heart, just as Kate did by challenging herself in the Presidentials in winter. Our hearts are our connection to our Source. I trust the Source.
I find day to day living in the workaday world very draining and unfufilling. So I seek extreme stuff. It is my nature. I question everything, which has led me to places where others only shake their heads in disbelief and fear. I am willing to bleed and die for my choices. But at the same time, I use my mind for discernment.
There is order in this world. There are laws which no one is exempt from. We don't control when we are born or when we die. Trust that and you may see the beauty, the consistency of this thing we call life. Life is not random.

Read through my other posts, if you see any inconsistencies, please point them out. I'm always open to a higher truth. I am always seeking, always questioning, always introspecting. It's fun, it's extreme!
 

Abubob

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I am willing to bleed and die for my choices. But at the same time, I use my mind for discernment.
There is order in this world. There are laws which no one is exempt from.
I think this is a healthy attitude. One of the things that bothered me about Kate's death is that she ignored warnings from park rangers.

We don't control when we are born or when we die. Trust that and you may see the beauty, the consistency of this thing we call life. Life is not random.
I'm not prepared to die for my recreation. I don't need to come within an inch of my life to see beauty. We are surrounded by it. Certainly the trail is the place to be immersed in it. However, even though I listen to my heart, my head trumps my heart most - most - every time. So while I don't control the drunk driver I do have control over what I do and don't do. I don't drink and drive. I keep my tires and brakes in order and try to drive a reasonable speed. When I'm on the trail I carry extra food and water and some medical supplies as I'm sure Kate did but I won't knowingly walk into a tempest. So while life has it random moments I mitigate by my choices. It sounds as though you do as well but with your experience you can press a bit - maybe quite a bit - further than most. Kate, no doubt, felt the same way. Still I think her heart led her astray. In the mountains the consequences of a misstep and a random occurrence are much more dire as you are well aware. To me, life is sacred. I - and this is a personal choice - will not risk it unnecessarily.
 

wtcobb

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Another hiker fallen on the Castle Ridge Trail, not far from Mt. Adams and Starr Lake... From PVSAR's post:

2016-02-28 -- Callout #1 - Castle Ridge Trail. Pemi supplied 11 people to the recovery effort that required upwards of 30 people from multiple agencies. The following article from the Union Leader gives an accurate description of the incident:

Hiker found dead on trail in White Mountain National Forest

A hiker was found dead Sunday morning on the Castle Ravine Trail between Mount Adams and Mount Jefferson in the White Mountain National Forest.

According to New Hampshire Fish and Game officials, two hikers came across the body of at 8:45 a.m. on the Castle Ravine Trail close to the tree line.

The hikers checked for a pulse and found the hiker frozen with no signs of life.

They tried to make a 911 call from that location but were unable to do so. The two then continued to hike down the trail until they met another hiker coming up about a mile from the trail head. They used that hiker's cell phone to make a 911 call at 11:22 a.m. reporting the dead hiker.

Conservation officers, volunteers from Androscoggin Valley Search and Rescue, Mountain Rescue Services, U.S. Forest Service, and Pemi Search and Rescue responded to assist in the recovery.

Conservation officers spoke with the hikers who found the body and a plan was made to have two teams come in from two separate directions to help in the recovery.

One team went up the Lowes Path to the Randolph Path across the ridge to the Castle Ravine Trail. The other team took a snow cat up Mount Washington and crossed the ridge line about five miles to reach the trail. Both groups arrived about 6 p.m.

By then it was dark and the location given was not precise enough for the rescue parties to quickly locate the victim.

Ultimately, the middle aged man, weighing about 200 pounds, was found. He has yet to be positively identified and his family has yet to be notified, Fish and Game officials said.

Conservation officers investigated the scene while consulting with the medical examiner. After finding nothing suspicious, they started moving the body down the mountain because it was impossible to go up the way they had come. Other search and rescue teams hiking up had to be diverted over very rugged terrain to aid with the extraction.

The rescue party made it out about 2:30 a.m. and were met by personnel from the Bryant Funeral Home, who brought the body to their facility where the medical examiner will start the process of determining the cause of death.

Once the man is positively identified and his family notified, officials said additional information will be made available.

Very sad. Condolences for the family.
 

wtcobb

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Something about Adams, man. My avi is the sign 1/2 mile below the summit from when I returned to hit it after failing coming up King Ravine, in September not winter. Just a brutal place.
 

yeggous

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He was identified as a hiker from New York:
http://www.conwaydailysun.com/newsx/local-news/124896-autopsy-done-on-hiker-s-frozen-body

Another year and another New Yorker found as a popsicle in the Presidentials. As a reminder, here is last year's version:
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/nyc-hiker-found-dead-n-h-mountains-article-1.2118000

This has become a trend. Somebody from New York thinks they know what it is like to hike in winter. He or she then feels that this qualifies them to tackle the Presidentials alone. Said person then freezes to death after realizing that he or she is no longer in Kansas.

I don't know why these people don't understand that the White Mountains are not the Catskills or Green Mountains. The White Mountains are much, much more severe and unforgiving than the rest of the East Coast.
 

wtcobb

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This has become a trend. Somebody from New York thinks they know what it is like to hike in winter. He or she then feels that this qualifies them to tackle the Presidentials alone. Said person then freezes to death after realizing that he or she is no longer in Kansas.

Well, he was an outdoor guide and former president of the New York State Outdoor Guides Association. I don't think the lesson here is that he didn't know what he was getting into - by all accounts he seems the most qualified to do so. The lesson is that it can happen to anyone.

I was out in the Presidentials hiking alone (save for my dog) on the same day, and I even pushed my original plan to get another 3 miles. The mountains are fickle. What caused his mishap is still unknown, but I don't find it fair to question his ability, especially knowing his background.
 

Abubob

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This is sad to be sure. But...

Hiking alone and with no ID? Experienced? Guide? Oh yeah nothing suspicious here.

A quote from his website:
In moving vessels at sea, it's necessary to pay great attention to details and logistics ... the particulars of the vessel, the waters, the weather. Every consideration for safety must be taken. The ability to implement backup plans has to be second nature. Nothing can be left to chance.

How does someone so experienced so adamant about safety allow himself to be so careless?
 

yeggous

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Hiking alone is not being prepared. Some dude from Long Island goes for a winter hike alone in the White Mountains and freezes to death. We've seen this before.


Sent from my iPhone using AlpineZone mobile app
 

wtcobb

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Being alone doesn't indicate preparedness or lack thereof. You can have a group be much less prepared than an individual hiker. Saturday I had crampons, three extra layers, a bivy, a tracking beacon, and surplus water/food. I could have spent the night outdoors if something happened. A group of three on top of Eisenhower had one set of microspikes between them.

Hiking alone and with no ID? Experienced? Guide? Oh yeah nothing suspicious here. How does someone so experienced so adamant about safety allow himself to be so careless?

This does seem odd. Again, I find no issue with hiking alone, but the lack of ID and judgement are questionable (though an ID wouldn't save you...). And obviously, he perished that night.

Did a lapse in judgement ultimately cause his demise? Obviously. But it's too simple to write off as "he didn't know what he was doing/getting into" or a lack of experience. It's insulting a man who just lost his life.

John Bachar was extremely experienced. But he was involved in an inherently risky sport (free soloing), something went wrong, and he fell to his death.
 

ALLSKIING

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Being alone doesn't indicate preparedness or lack thereof. You can have a group be much less prepared than an individual hiker. Saturday I had crampons, three extra layers, a bivy, a tracking beacon, and surplus water/food. I could have spent the night outdoors if something happened. A group of three on top of Eisenhower had one set of microspikes between them.



This does seem odd. Again, I find no issue with hiking alone, but the lack of ID and judgement are questionable (though an ID wouldn't save you...). And obviously, he perished that night.

Did a lapse in judgement ultimately cause his demise? Obviously. But it's too simple to write off as "he didn't know what he was doing/getting into" or a lack of experience. It's insulting a man who just lost his life.

John Bachar was extremely experienced. But he was involved in an inherently risky sport (free soloing), something went wrong, and he fell to his death.

We'll said!
 
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