• Welcome to AlpineZone, the largest online community of skiers and snowboarders in the Northeast!

    You may have to REGISTER before you can post. Registering is FREE, gets rid of the majority of advertisements, and lets you participate in giveaways and other AlpineZone events!

need me some new boots

mriceyman

New member
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
1,344
Points
0
Location
cnj
looking for some help. since my boots are 9 years old I am def in need of new ones. im an advanced skier who loves the trees, bumps and steeps. any recommendations on which direction to head in as theres many options to chose from. thanks for the help.
 

drjeff

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
17,342
Points
63
Location
Brooklyn, CT
Seriously just seek out the names in your area of some GOOD bootfitters and go into their shop(s) with an open mind and an honest evaluation of your skiing and let them evaluate your foot shape + volume and let them match that to their stock.

Much better to start with something that works for your foot shape + ability and tweak from there rather than get a boot because such and such says its great and then try and make it fit your foot

Sent from my DROID RAZR using AlpineZone mobile app
 

Hawkshot99

New member
Joined
Aug 16, 2006
Messages
4,489
Points
0
Location
Poughkeepsie, NY
I agree 100% with DrJeff. I personally love Dalbello Boots, but only because the shape matches my foot shape.

Go into a good shop, with a complete open mind on what type of boot will be best.
 

ScottySkis

Active member
Joined
Jan 16, 2011
Messages
11,998
Points
38
Location
Middletown NY
I agree 100% with DrJeff. I personally love Dalbello Boots, but only because the shape matches my foot shape.

Go into a good shop, with a complete open mind on what type of boot will be best.

+2 I have had these boots and love them to. If you have irregular feet they are awesome.
 

WoodCore

Active member
Joined
Jun 15, 2007
Messages
3,191
Points
38
Location
CT
+3 Whatever fits and feels best is the right boot! Tecnica boots fit my foot right out of the box without any messing around. The new Cochise line is pretty hot IMHO! :snow:
 

jack97

New member
Joined
Mar 4, 2006
Messages
2,513
Points
0
looking for some help. since my boots are 9 years old I am def in need of new ones. im an advanced skier who loves the trees, bumps and steeps. any recommendations on which direction to head in as theres many options to chose from. thanks for the help.

I'll throw in a contrarily remark.... if you really like bumps and trees, go target the dalbellos and full tilt boots. They have the three piece (cabrio) design which gives the skier a progressive flex about the ankle joint, this design minimizes shin bang when you hit uneven terrain. All other designs which are the two piece design (currently in vogue) is geared more for racing, current generation boots have lateral stiffness, do not have a forward lean and do not have that progressive flex. And imo, the latter are not geared for the skiing bumps and trees.

I def agree that finding a boot that fits is the highest priority but you should be aware that both dalbellos and full tilt have models with different last. In addition, bootfitters may not carry all lines of each boot.
 
Last edited:

mriceyman

New member
Joined
Jan 4, 2012
Messages
1,344
Points
0
Location
cnj
Thanks for the replies and thanks to jack for that info.. I will check em out soon.


Sent from my iPhone
 

deadheadskier

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
25,809
Points
63
Location
Southeast NH
As a contrary to Jack's point, I wouldn't go with one particularly brand our boot style just because they are recommended for a certain style of skiing. I like skiing bumps perhaps more than any other kind of a terrain. I bought the Dalbello Krypton Pro hype a few years ago and never have been all that happy with them. They're okay, but I think I'll be returning to a traditional overlap designed boot after this season. Patrick Deneen is one of the best male US bumpers ever. He skis Lange.
 

jack97

New member
Joined
Mar 4, 2006
Messages
2,513
Points
0
Patrick Deneen is one of the best male US bumpers ever. He skis Lange.

Lange still has good forward lean. btw, I heard some old school bumpers at the national and wc level modified the lange boots to get more flex.

btw, not taking anything away from deneen, I would almost give anything to ski like him but he is not the best us male ever. He won a wc championship base on his air not on his turns.
 

deadheadskier

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
25,809
Points
63
Location
Southeast NH
I did say "one of". I have read that he prefers a stiffer boot....as do I. I just find the Krypton to be "sloppy" and not very responsive compared to a traditional overlap boot.

Sent from my XT907 using AlpineZone mobile app
 

jack97

New member
Joined
Mar 4, 2006
Messages
2,513
Points
0
I did say "one of"

That would be debatable and it would take this thread off topic.


I just find the Krypton to be "sloppy" and not very responsive compared to a traditional overlap boot.

When I got my dalbellos, the bootfitter said some love that progressive flex while others hated it and preferred the responsiveness of a stiff two piece design.

For a while, lange and the old flexion (now fulltilt) dominated the wc bumper scene. Going back to the mid 90s, you can clearly see which WC champs and Olympic medalist used the full tilt due to its unique ribbed tongue and colors. From what I heard, the lange had forward lean so that the skis can be front loaded and it was easy to modify for more flex by taking out a certain hinge.

In addition, some modern day two piece ski boots may not have the forward lean as the lange. The current preferred approach is to have a more open ankle stance and rely on the lateral stiffness of the boots to roll the skis from side to side. This takes the pressure off the thighs since they do not need to flex the knees as much. IMO.... the reason this type skiing is bad for bumps and tress is that these types of turns takes to long to complete.
 

Madroch

New member
Joined
Nov 13, 2008
Messages
1,490
Points
0
Location
ct
As a bumper wannabe- tried hard to fit into the kryptons- too wide- I have a very narrow foot- am in a Lange 92 plug- rivets blown out for some flex-(actually one busted- drilled EM both out- now happier) love the fit- wish they had a little larger flex range.
 

deadheadskier

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 6, 2005
Messages
25,809
Points
63
Location
Southeast NH
The current preferred approach is to have a more open ankle stance and rely on the lateral stiffness of the boots to roll the skis from side to side. This takes the pressure off the thighs since they do not need to flex the knees as much. IMO.... the reason this type skiing is bad for bumps and tress is that these types of turns takes to long to complete.

My point Jack is that it's all about personal preference. Yes, there is a "world cup" style to skiing bumps, but that doesn't mean that other styles of skiing bumps (and especially trees) is "bad". I don't find the Kryptons to be overly quick; in fact quite the opposite. I find the progressive flex (even on the stiffest setting as I have mine set up) actually slows down turn initiation and weakens the lateral power transmitted to the skis edges. I want near instantaneous response and snow feedback when I roll my ankles and toe in my ski tips to the turn; like a slalom racer does. I get more of that out of a traditional overlap design than I do a three piece. The extended play with progressive flex makes me feel late sometimes and I find myself getting in the back seat in these boots more so than any boot I've owned in the past. Now some of this might be my weight. Depending on my diet motivation :lol: I'll weigh anywhere from 180 to 200# during ski season. I've read of other heavier skiers finding that they overpower the Krypton like I do.


I've still enjoyed the boots for a few seasons now and will eek out one more year with them, but will be returning to an overlap on my next pair of boots and one with a hike option for side country. I have no idea if they'll fit my feet well, but I like what I'm reading about the Rossignol Alltrack Pro 130 for a do everything boot.
 

jack97

New member
Joined
Mar 4, 2006
Messages
2,513
Points
0
My point Jack is that it's all about personal preference. Yes, there is a "world cup" style to skiing bumps, but that doesn't mean that other styles of skiing bumps (and especially trees) is "bad". I don't find the Kryptons to be overly quick; in fact quite the opposite. I find the progressive flex (even on the stiffest setting as I have mine set up) actually slows down turn initiation and weakens the lateral power transmitted to the skis edges. I want near instantaneous response and snow feedback when I roll my ankles and toe in my ski tips to the turn; like a slalom racer does. I get more of that out of a traditional overlap design than I do a three piece. The extended play with progressive flex makes me feel late sometimes and I find myself getting in the back seat in these boots more so than any boot I've owned in the past. Now some of this might be my weight. Depending on my diet motivation :lol: I'll weigh anywhere from 180 to 200# during ski season. I've read of other heavier skiers finding that they overpower the Krypton like I do.


I've still enjoyed the boots for a few seasons now and will eek out one more year with them, but will be returning to an overlap on my next pair of boots and one with a hike option for side country. I have no idea if they'll fit my feet well, but I like what I'm reading about the Rossignol Alltrack Pro 130 for a do everything boot.


no offense... you're the first to dropped a wc name on this thread. And I did mention some prefer the progressive flex and some do not.

In addition, what Madroch said may be correct on the lange, serious bumpers had to blow out the rivets to get that flex.
 

bigbog

Active member
Joined
Feb 17, 2004
Messages
4,876
Points
36
Location
Bangor and the state's woodlands
all the previous....
Fwiw...Some boots have Walk-mode and interchangeable soles, have taken a few years but now out there and are quality boots..some are pricey, some are affordable.
Check the soles(or downhill sole) to make sure they can be altered if you need it...or you can go under the binding to apply mods(ie shim strips).... Sounds like a PITA, but there's no law that prohibits using two sets(lengths) of screws...for 1)walkmode and 2) downhill...
Multiple lasts/shapes are out there too and often sold within the same company...
 
Last edited:
Top