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Too much waxing bad for ski base?

Sum1

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Is it bad for your ski bases to wax them before every ski weekend?

A fellow told me that if you leave too much wax on your skis it can "seap" or "weave" into the base layer in such a way that it begins to crack and deteriorate the base material.

I'll admit I've probably been applying too much wax (Purl Purple Non-PFC All Temp) and not scraping it off the base as perfectly as a professional, but I'm completely satisfied with the results of my effort -- my skis feel slippy, smooth, and fast under foot. After two days running on New England dust on crust, ice, and whatnot, there is considerable wax depletion, but not all gone.

So, am I destroying my skis or is a little extra wax basically harmless?

Thanks for your help and guidance.
 
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wa-loaf

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I think the idea is you want the wax to absorb into the structure of the base. Only prob with a lot of waxing is if you aren't scraping well you will get wax built-up. Base will get damaged if the iron is too hot.
 

Nick

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I can't imagine how too much wax would physically damage the skis but maybe there is something I'm missing.

Is wax build up make you slower? Why wouldn't you want a layer of was under the base?
 

Sum1

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Only prob with a lot of waxing is if you aren't scraping well you will get wax built-up. Base will get damaged if the iron is too hot.

Thanks for the response, Mr. Loaf.
I just bought some decent ski vice gear so I can definitely do a better job of sraping more accurately and cleanly.
I didn't think about the iron heat, though. I try not to let it set in one spot and keep it moving constantly, but I may be leaving the setting too high after the initial wax dripping.
 

snowmonster

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I didn't think about the iron heat, though. I try not to let it set in one spot and keep it moving constantly, but I may be leaving the setting too high after the initial wax dripping.

If the wax begins to smoke, the iron is too hot. Either turn down the heat or stop waxing to let the iron cool a bit.

Be sure to scrape off the wax. Wax build up will slow you down. I have never heard of waxing damaging your skis (unless you burn your base but that's another story). On the contrary, frequent waxing protects your ski's base. I wax every three ski days just to keep things fresh.
 

Scruffy

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You got some wrong advice. There is literally no way to wax too much. If you just kept waxing, assuming you're not burning your base, once all the pores of the base are filled with wax the melted wax would just drip off the sides and you would be wasting it.

Have you heard of a Hot Box? Racers have their skis hot boxed. Thick layer of wax ironed on, skis go into a box base side up, the box has a heating element and is heated for hours, as the whole ski heats up and pores expand wax is impregnated into pores even more than can be achived by waxing from the iron. Skis come out, rinse and repeat.
 

Sum1

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If the wax begins to smoke, the iron is too hot. Either turn down the heat or stop waxing to let the iron cool a bit.

Nice. That's a guideline I can follow.

I have never heard of waxing damaging your skis (unless you burn your base but that's another story). On the contrary, frequent waxing protects your ski's base.

That's what I've always read too.
After running Northeast conditions for a few seasons, it would seem you can't wax often enough to keep the bases protected.
 

Sum1

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You got some wrong advice. There is literally no way to wax too much. If you just kept waxing, assuming you're not burning your base, once all the pores of the base are filled with wax the melted wax would just drip off the sides and you would be wasting it.

Thanks for the re-assurance, Scruff.
Sounds like the only thing I need to do is watch the iron temp. and be a little more careful to make a smooth wax layer.
 

JDMRoma

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Thanks for the re-assurance, Scruff.
Sounds like the only thing I need to do is watch the iron temp. and be a little more careful to make a smooth wax layer.

I tend to wax frequently too, but I am careful on the Iron temps.....but Guilty of not scraping it all off !
 

Warp Daddy

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I wax after every 3 days too. i make sure the iron temp is controlled somewhat below the temp recommended and keep that sucker MOVING . I scrape it down and buff it with a series of brushes . been doing this forever , no issues . When i do an extended road trip i use one of the flouro wax tubes that just apply it . Works for me .
 

hammer

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Is there any advantage of pushing the upper limit on the iron temp? I have it hot enough to melt the wax and smooth it over and keep it moving as suggested. I'm pretty sure I could scrape more and I'm still working on using as little wax as possible...mainly because a thick coat that gets scraped off is a waste.

My skis are due for this weekend...
 

Sum1

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I'm encouraged by all the responses to this thread.
Can't express how helpful it is to read the experiences of others.
 

snowmonster

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Is there any advantage of pushing the upper limit on the iron temp?
The only reason to crank up the temp is to melt a hard wax (like the Swix green wax used for really cold temps). However, once it gets too hot and the wax smokes, you're changing the characteristics of the wax and, in the case of fluoro waxes, you're burning away the fluoro.

I'm all for using as little wax as possible. When you have a thick layer of wax, it's a PITA to scrape it off after it's cooled.
 

Bobt2ski

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I used to work at a ski area and spent a lot of time on the snow!!!! I wax before every time I go out. I've tried about every method there is but finally settled on rubbing the wax by hand, then rubbing with a cork to smooth out, in which I believe the friction of the cork puts some wax into the pours, then finally rubbing with a soft cloth. No damage to the ski, no waste to the wax and skis glide through the snow just as good if not better than any one!!!!
 

Sum1

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Update: I had a chance to try out the Toko 3-piece ski vise product and it has made a world of difference in helping me be more precise in applying and scraping the wax. Previously, I was holding/steadying the ski with one hand and waxing/scraping with the other. With the vises, the skis are held motionless to a bench and I can apply pressure more evenly with two hands and scrape to a finer finish. Now that I can scrape more cleanly and thoroughly, I can also see that I don't need as much wax to begin with.

The vise-bench simplified everything.
Learning slowly and steadily; the best part is it's all fun when it comes together.

Again, really appreciate the thoughts and experiences of forum members.
 
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