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Vail Resorts is buying Peak Resorts.

jimmywilson69

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yeah it seems that poaching has become very common at places in the northeast. I imagine it happens out west, but consequences have the potential to be much worse, DEATH, than just having your pass pulled or yelled at by patrol.
 

FBGM

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yeah it seems that poaching has become very common at places in the northeast. I imagine it happens out west, but consequences have the potential to be much worse, DEATH, than just having your pass pulled or yelled at by patrol.

Who is dying from poaching something at a resort? Unless you’re running into a snowcat on a closed trail or snap a femur on a ground gun on a closed trail. If that’s the case, we are just thinning the heard of the dumb.
 

BenedictGomez

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A skier ducked a rope & triggered an in-bounds avalanche at Copper Mountain just this weekend, but luckily nobody was below.
 

jaytrem

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Honestly haven't noticed much of a difference in what the ambassadors and patrolers are doing.

What I have noticed, is that more folks (not a huge amount, but sure feels like more folks) are pushing the boundaries on what they're doing on the hill (speed, rope ducking, being courteous, respecting the posted rules, etc) and I think that that may be more of what's going on verses a complete change in the enforcement policy

I did notice some patrollers speaking with a guy that was snowing up Long John the other day. Was wondering if they were just chatting or enforcing some policy.

I do hope they continue to be liberal with the trail openings and still use the good ol "thin cover/variable condition" signs.
 

abc

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Lower Hudson Valley
yeah it seems that poaching has become very common at places in the northeast. I imagine it happens out west, but consequences have the potential to be much worse, DEATH, than just having your pass pulled or yelled at by patrol.
Who is dying from poaching something at a resort? Unless you’re running into a snowcat on a closed trail or snap a femur on a ground gun on a closed trail. If that’s the case, we are just thinning the heard of the dumb.
I was referring to poaching out west where you could be killed in an avalanche.
Or fall off a unmarked cliff!
Well, I suppose those who are dumb enough he can't figure out the danger of poaching out west are prime to be thin from the "herd of the dumb"
 

GregoryIsaacs

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Dec 18, 2017
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Well, I suppose those who are dumb enough he can't figure out the danger of poaching out west are prime to be thin from the "herd of the dumb"

As if we ever needed proof that FBGM was stupid........ Can we put this post on a wall-of-shame somewhere?
 

BenedictGomez

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Why he so dumb, when he hears explosions going off he assumes there's a celebration going on.
 

2Planker

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May 16, 2007
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Location
Conway NH
Who is dying from poaching something at a resort? Unless you’re running into a snowcat on a closed trail or snap a femur on a ground gun on a closed trail. If that’s the case, we are just thinning the heard of the dumb.

Responded to that very scenario, years ago @ SR.
Made for a bad day for a whole bunch of people.

Dude did OK after a lil help from Life Flight
 
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Jcb890

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Feb 25, 2015
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Central MA
Honestly haven't noticed much of a difference in what the ambassadors and patrolers are doing.

What I have noticed, is that more folks (not a huge amount, but sure feels like more folks) are pushing the boundaries on what they're doing on the hill (speed, rope ducking, being courteous, respecting the posted rules, etc) and I think that that may be more of what's going on verses a complete change in the enforcement policy
Agreed. I think once the season hits full steam we'll see more folks out there 'policing' in the slow zones. However, that seemed to be more common/more of a trend the past few seasons anyways.

Not sure I agree with the 'pushing boundaries' portion... any good examples on that one? Perhaps just some different clientele who ride/ski as they normally do at their regular results, however, have come to check out Mt. Snow early season.

[rant] One thing that always bugs me is people stopping in terrible spots. I understand it's the person coming downhill who is responsible to keep things safe and not cause problems, but people need to stop on the sides of the trail and not on down-slopes, etc. I have seen a bunch of that this season with people putting themselves in possibly dangerous positions. [/rant] :lol:
 

jaytrem

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Oct 22, 2007
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I understand it's the person coming downhill who is responsible to keep things safe and not cause problems, but people need to stop on the sides of the trail and not on down-slopes, etc. :lol:

Debatable, run em down, see #3....


  1. Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  2. People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  3. You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  4. Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  5. Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  6. Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.
 

Cornhead

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Dec 4, 2010
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I don't think I made a single run without violating rule 6 yesterday. None of the poaching was done alone. I think that's the biggest problem with skiing closed terrain is that if you were alone, and something were to happen, and you couldn't summon help with your phone, you could be in trouble.

The shit we were skiing was definitely hazardous to your equipment, little or no base, but except for the occasional water bar, the risk was minimal. Sometimes it's hard to believe the closures aren't just "suggestions". We skied Belleayre on 12/2 after 23" and there were 3 trails officially open. I'm pretty sure the ropes were to prevent the, "Let's ski this one" only to be confronted with two foot high brush poking through the steep parts, with the inevitable water bar at the transition to the flatter part. To expect everyone to stay on 3 groomed blue and green trails with two feet of fresh snow is just unrealistic.

Poaching out west is a whole different animal. I don't think I would ever do it.

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