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When is there too much snow?

deadheadskier

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+1

Wider skis with some rocker are a total game changer in deep snow and trees. 98mm is a good compromise width for eastern powder, but even wider is better if can manage dedicated powder skis.
Yes, that's a good compromise

If I only was to have one pair of skis in the East and I skied North enough that powder and trees being open frequently was my common experience, I would buy something in the 95 - 100 range.

If those conditions where infrequent for me, but I still valued good performance the few days a season I got to ski them, 88-92 would be what I'd want.

Right now my everyday ski is a 90 and my powder ski a 107. Love them both. I'm pretty particular about performance though. The 90s are mostly great, but leave something to be desired on the boilerplate days. A 90 width is also still a bit too burly for proper ziplinning bumps.

I finally tried a set of modern bump skis with Savemeasammy a couple weeks ago and holy cow what a difference. Made me want a pair in a big way, but I'm guessing they wouldn't deliver what I want on boilerplate. Going to a four ski quiver seems a bit much. I'll probably eventually grab something in the 75-80 range that has great bite on the hard stuff, but also can zip well. I think something like a Head irally would fit the bill.

Ski manufacturing has gotten so advanced it really has me by the balls. The manufacturers have gotten so good at producing equipment for specific conditions that once you try such a ski, it makes you not want to compromise.

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Savemeasammy

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OP - this was alluded to by someone, but deep snow is great on steeps, but not so much on flats. I was at Pico in the morning yesterday (and also another powder day in Dec). Pico has some really flat runouts to the summit quad, and imo these runouts should have at least one groomer track in the center. That would allow people to get some speed so they could venture back into the deep pow for a few turns. As it was, there were a number of runouts that had a singletrack leading out. Your results will vary of course. If you are on fat, floaty powder boards, you will have an easier go of it.

Off topic: DHS, my F17 WC's have a regular tune with a 90 degree edge (rather than a beveled mogul tune). I find they ski hardpack surprisingly well.


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St. Bear

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Two categories.

1. Power outages and serious threat to life. Like what CA has dealt with this year, and I remember Hunter a number of years ago with 84" in a week, and the town kept losing power. That is obviously too much snow.

2. "First World Problem" too much snow. This can be split into two sub-categories.
a. Inability to ski deep snow. Whether by inexperience, lack of ability, or inappropriate gear, this is a legitimate issue; but it's on you, not the snow.
b. Lack of steeps. I was at Jack Frost on Wednesday. They got 30" on Tuesday and another 5" on Wednesday. The mountain lacks any sustained vertical, and is very much like a stair step. So you'd get 3-4 nice turns, then have to flounder and duck walk to the next drop. Repeat 3-4 times to the bottom. It was better than not skiing powder at all, but I can see where the more casual skier would get fed up with the process.
 

BenedictGomez

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Would fat skis make that much of a difference for an average skier?

Definitely.

For the longest time, my only skis were 67mm underfoot, submarining in deep snow and I was a horrendous tree skier. Then I bought a pair of 90mm underfoot and it made an incredible difference, overnight I became a bad tree skier. Seeing such improvement, I bought a pair of Rossy S7's, which are 115mm underfoot and that helped in deep snow even move, making me merely a poor tree skier.
 

kingslug

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The only way to learn to ski deep snow..is to go to places that get it. I floundered for years in Utah on my Skinny skis, then rented, then bought. It just takes practice, which is tough when we don't get anything deep. Its like skiing super steep narrow chutes, tough to practice that here. I t may sound crazy but I watched TGR and MSP films a million times and studied how they moved around. But then would have to go west to try it out. So any chance you get, even if its only 6 inches..practice.
 

Cornhead

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Do these fat skis that float along the surface make 30" of powder feel like 8"?
Not if you weigh 260lbs, but every bit helps. Haven't got stuck since I got 132mm underfoot. I had more fun at Belle Tuesday afternoon, much fluffier snow than Platty Wednesday. I think the wind packed it in, felt alot denser. More work to ski. Fluffier in the trees though.


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kingslug

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I ski a 105 in everything. I designed them for ice and powder. Yes 120's would be better in the deep stuff but murder on ice. Technique is the biggie though. I've seen people rip through 3 feet on 75 underfoot, old school style. They say they like to sink in and pop out. Wider skis are like water skiing. Which is how I describe it to people who have trouble in it. You can't use hardpack technique, you'll end up breaking something, like you leg.
 

Griswold

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OP - this was alluded to by someone, but deep snow is great on steeps, but not so much on flats. I was at Pico in the morning yesterday (and also another powder day in Dec). Pico has some really flat runouts to the summit quad, and imo these runouts should have at least one groomer track in the center. That would allow people to get some speed so they could venture back into the deep pow for a few turns. As it was, there were a number of runouts that had a singletrack leading out. Your results will vary of course. If you are on fat, floaty powder boards, you will have an easier go of it.

Off topic: DHS, my F17 WC's have a regular tune with a 90 degree edge (rather than a beveled mogul tune). I find they ski hardpack surprisingly well.


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So your side edge is 90? What is your base edge at? Just bought mogul skis so am curious what edge bevels most people tune them to. Thanks


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Domeskier

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So your side edge is 90? What is your base edge at? Just bought mogul skis so am curious what edge bevels most people tune them to. Thanks

Kinda curious about the purported benefits of beveled edges for mogul skiing. I have three pairs of mogul skis and have no idea what the shop does to the edges when I get them tuned. If it's just for world cup skiers to go a little faster than their world cup skiing opponents, I think I'm good.
 
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So your side edge is 90? What is your base edge at? Just bought mogul skis so am curious what edge bevels most people tune them to. Thanks


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What skis did you get? I need to get some mogul skis for next season.
 

Griswold

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What skis did you get? I need to get some mogul skis for next season.

K2 244 mamba. Got them on eBay from a shop in Canada with look pivot 14 bindings included for about $500. Considering the bindings retail for about $350, I thought it was a good deal. Looking forward to trying them next weekend at killington.


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K2 244 mamba. Got them on eBay from a shop in Canada with look pivot 14 bindings included for about $500. Considering the bindings retail for about $350, I thought it was a good deal. Looking forward to trying them next weekend at killington.


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Nice! I love the top sheet graphics on those. My first google was for Harts but they are freaking expensive. It seems like most of the serious bumpers are really into the Dynastars but I probably wouldn't know the difference anyways. How tall are you and what length did you go with?
 

Griswold

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Nice! I love the top sheet graphics on those. My first google was for Harts but they are freaking expensive. It seems like most of the serious bumpers are really into the Dynastars but I probably wouldn't know the difference anyways. How tall are you and what length did you go with?

Yeah, I wanted Harts too but they are more than I wanted to spend. I'm 5"10 and got the 173's. Also looked at the twisters too but ended up going with these because of the money difference. Here is the exact link if interested.

http://m.ebay.com/itm/311778249243?_mwBanner=1







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prsboogie

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Yeah, I wanted Harts too but they are more than I wanted to spend. I'm 5"10 and got the 173's. Also looked at the twisters too but ended up going with these because of the money difference. Here is the exact link if interested.

http://m.ebay.com/itm/311778249243?_mwBanner=1







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Same company just direct from them - price is in CAD funds
http://www.corbetts.com/2017-k2-244-mens-mogel-skis-only/


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mishka

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Guys we're drinking pbr's waiting in line at 815. Wish I was still in college. I do appreciate the responses. I am sure tin crushes it in all depths of snow, but for me today was a more difficult day than say 12" of powder a month ago, which is why I asked the question. No denying my level of ability either. Would fat skis make that much of a difference for an average skier?


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12 inches is not the same as truly bottomless. deeper it gets hard to ski on skinny short skis.

There are many discussions on the subject "does it need to own wide powder skis". This thread is great example of it. Maybe for some it's would be one ONE day season when they need pow skis but that day can create memory of lifetime or miserable day and thread like this one ..... your choice

but on another hand....:thumbup: in January I found myself in mineral basin at Snowbird which was closed five days and three big storms with visibility about 10 yards. The only way I could determine direction and steepness of the slope by see many people down the slope who felt and looking for their skinny skis
 

bdfreetuna

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Either no bevel or negative 1 degree, maybe 2 degree bevel if you want to rip it up on ice. But this can get "hooky" if you aren't prepared to carve every turn. No bevel IMO best all-mountain, all-conditions.

I can't see basically detuning my entire ski just so slipping mogul lines is a little faster. I have old rock skis I don't maintain for that.
 
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