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best truly waterproof outerwear and gloves?

skiur

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Skiing in the rain sucks. While the snow is usually very nice, visibility usually sucks, you have to constantly wipe your goggles which makes visibility even worse and on top of all that you are getting wet. Did I mention that visibility sucks? I hate skiing when I can't see.
 

KustyTheKlown

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Just say no to skiing in the rain.

in a perfect world i agree. but in the northeast in 2022, we're gonna have some days where we are walking the razorblade between snow and rain and I'm still gonna ski on those days usually. the full on downpour (see this past Saturday) is when i sit it out. I've also had some very wet days in snowing conditions. i recall an epic 10"+ powder day at powmow where i got back to the car drenched. 31 degrees and dumping. i def got wet. so yea, i want a better waterproofed kit, but agree fuck the rain
 
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2Planker

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May 16, 2007
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Best Gloves ever - Rocky Mountain Hand Shoes. Had one pair last over `almost 10 years of Patrolling, approx 350 days

Low tech, Elk Hide and Wool Liners
 

x10003q

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Aug 14, 2009
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Bergen County, NJ
I've used up to 5 layers when Stowe hit 48 below windchill last year...worked pretty well..the shell keeps that damn wind out.
And it gets pretty windy up there...
I could never ski in 5 layers. When it is uber cold /below zero I switch from the Flylow Roswell to an OR Stormbound Pertex/down jacket with a patagonia r2 fleece and some kind of terramar long sleeve shirt as the bottom layer.
 

Smellytele

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Right where I want to be
Most days I ski with 4 layers on top. Short sleeve poly, long sleeve poly, next layer is the one that varies sometimes a fleece jacket, sometimes a partial fleece/ part down and very cold days full down, then shell on top. Really Warm days I skip the insulating layer.
 

KustyTheKlown

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i also like to layer. i'd rather be too warm than too cold, and i tend to run a little cold. i can always shed a layer if i need to

- technical merino ski underwear. sometimes 2x if very cold
- a light quarter zip fleece
- a heavy merino smartwool flannel shirt/jacket - removed in warm temps
- my strafe insulated jacket, or my faction shell in warmer temps
 

deadheadskier

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My solution is to not ski in the rain. I've done it a few times. I doubt I will ever do it again.

As a teenager, I loved skiing in the rain. My folks would drop me off at Okemo with a trash bag over my head and I'd bash the rain softened bumps on Sels Choice for hours with no lift lines.

As an adult, I no longer bother. I guess after 39 years of skiing, missing days because of weather is no longer that bothersome to me.

But, I also live within an hour of decent skiing. If I lived in NYC like Krusty and one weekend day looks good and the other bad, I'd probably try and find a way to ski both days to make the drive worth it.
 

abc

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If I lived in NYC like Krusty and one weekend day looks good and the other bad, I'd probably try and find a way to ski both days to make the drive worth it.
That’s an excellent observation.

Though I‘m no longer based in NYC, I still have a minimum 2 hour drive to VT. I don’t head out if the entire weekend is a washout. But, when one weekend day looks great and the other one looks wet (a situation I found myself in in spring time a lot), I often opted to ski both days. Having the appropriate clothing makes that an easy decision.

Granted, I actually enjoy skiing in the rain for the most part. For the snow surface condition, that is. Not everyone like to ski cream cheese, I know. So to me, getting suitable clothing that keeps me dry on rainy days is no different from getting suitable clothing to keep me warm on ”regular cold days” all winter long.

If you think about it, people who don’t ski would be baffled at how much we paid to get clothing to keep us warm while staying outside for a whole day, when we “should” be staying inside by the fire on those cold days. Yet I’m 100% sure everyone here had worked out what can keep them warm on the mountain all day long! So I don’t see why it’s such a big deal that some people who wants to ski in the rain are looking for appropriate clothing for that condition.
 

JDMRoma

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Jan 20, 2013
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That’s an excellent observation.

Though I‘m no longer based in NYC, I still have a minimum 2 hour drive to VT. I don’t head out if the entire weekend is a washout. But, when one weekend day looks great and the other one looks wet (a situation I found myself in in spring time a lot), I often opted to ski both days. Having the appropriate clothing makes that an easy decision.

Granted, I actually enjoy skiing in the rain for the most part. For the snow surface condition, that is. Not everyone like to ski cream cheese, I know. So to me, getting suitable clothing that keeps me dry on rainy days is no different from getting suitable clothing to keep me warm on ”regular cold days” all winter long.

If you think about it, people who don’t ski would be baffled at how much we paid to get clothing to keep us warm while staying outside for a whole day, when we “should” be staying inside by the fire on those cold days. Yet I’m 100% sure everyone here had worked out what can keep them warm on the mountain all day long! So I don’t see why it’s such a big deal that some people who wants to ski in the rain are looking for appropriate clothing for that condition.
Totally agree ! I dont mind skiing in the rain, soft snow and no lines win /win ! If I plan a day off and use a vacation day, Ill be skiing the whole day rain or snow.
Cant waste days off, too hard to get them !
 

KustyTheKlown

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Windham being on ikon and Indy having some options within 3 hours helps on the weekends when one day is a wash
 

Domeskier

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New York
Keeping glasses/goggles dry in rain or wet snow is a big pain. Old eyes are a big pain too. Maybe it's time for contacts.
 

4aprice

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Mar 14, 2008
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I guess after 39 years of skiing, missing days because of weather is no longer that bothersome to me.
50 + years of skiing here. I find myself skipping for more then just for rain. Last season for a period it seemed like every weekend brought along with it "icy cold" weather. I did not string together 2 consecutive weekend days for many weeks in a row. -20 windchills v pillow, the pillow won. Even on a weekend up at our friends house in Killington we opted for cards and cocktails one Sunday. Northeastern weather can be cruel.
 

drjeff

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Keeping glasses/goggles dry in rain or wet snow is a big pain. Old eyes are a big pain too. Maybe it's time for contacts.
A little Rain X wipe on the goggle lens before starting my rain ski day has helped a bunch. It's more about convincing my brain to look past the water droplets on my goggle lens and at the terrain infront of me, and then get that I won't be skiing at max out because of the decreased visibility and more likley variable snow conditions that I could encounter
 

abc

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Keeping glasses/goggles dry in rain or wet snow is a big pain. Old eyes are a big pain too. Maybe it's time for contacts.
Wet snow is hard to deal with. It sticks on the lens. Rain I found it easier to deal with. Perhaps I’m doing what DrJeff is talking about, I just look pass the droplets. I don’t ski fast even on non-rainy days. And the slopes are usually a lot emptier on rainy days. So I don’t need to see too well to ski safely.

If you’re “old”, your eyes probably won’t take contacts too well If you haven’t done it from a younger day. LASIK instead?
 

abc

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50 + years of skiing here. I find myself skipping for more then just for rain. Last season for a period it seemed like every weekend brought along with it "icy cold" weather. I did not string together 2 consecutive weekend days for many weeks in a row. -20 windchills v pillow, the pillow won. Even on a weekend up at our friends house in Killington we opted for cards and cocktails one Sunday. Northeastern weather can be cruel.
I’m passed skiing everyday now.

But of all the unpleasant weather, I found wind to be the most unpleasant. Chairs swing, stop, leaving me dangling in mid-air blasted by the chill wind freezing my butt off. So it’s the one I skip most readily.

I had the advantage that I also cross country ski. Super cold days are just perfect for cross country skiing! :) Even many windy days are quite enjoyable xc skiing in tree-lined trails. No chair rides to worry about.
 

raisingarizona

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I’m passed skiing everyday now.

But of all the unpleasant weather, I found wind to be the most unpleasant. Chairs swing, stop, leaving me dangling in mid-air blasted by the chill wind freezing my butt off. So it’s the one I skip most readily.

I had the advantage that I also cross country ski. Super cold days are just perfect for cross country skiing! :) Even many windy days are quite enjoyable xc skiing in tree-lined trails. No chair rides to worry about.
Maybe but fresh wind buffed cream is the jam man!
 

raisingarizona

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50 + years of skiing here. I find myself skipping for more then just for rain. Last season for a period it seemed like every weekend brought along with it "icy cold" weather. I did not string together 2 consecutive weekend days for many weeks in a row. -20 windchills v pillow, the pillow won. Even on a weekend up at our friends house in Killington we opted for cards and cocktails one Sunday. Northeastern weather can be cruel.
Quality>Quantity. I don't have to go or have anything to prove and I've never been much of numbers sort of guy. Different strokes for different folks!

Shoot, These days I prefer no lines and chalky moguls over deep and powder frenzied weekends but I've spent so much of my life chasing snow I feel extremely satisfied. I'd probably have a totally different opinion if I was a 9-5 tri-state area office sort of guy.
 

HowieT2

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A little Rain X wipe on the goggle lens before starting my rain ski day has helped a bunch. It's more about convincing my brain to look past the water droplets on my goggle lens and at the terrain infront of me, and then get that I won't be skiing at max out because of the decreased visibility and more likley variable snow conditions that I could encounter
is rainX safe to use on goggle lens? I'd be afraid of damaging the coating.
seeing in the rain is bad but freezing rain where the goggles get coated with ice is the worst. and yes, I have one of those mini squeegee things
 
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