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Does the "skiers code" need to be updated?

Bene288

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I saw this topic on Epic Ski, and after reading in the "People wearing their helmets wrong" thread, I thought this would be a good discussion.

There is a perception on most mountains that the downhill skier is invincible. Impervious to all fault during a collision. I've witnessed this many times; a beginner or child drifts into the lane of the uphill skier. Uphill skier practically condemned to the gallows by the downhill skier and patrol/ops. I acknowledge, agree and follow the fact that the uphill skier should always be in control and be aware of what is in front.

However I think that the safety code should HIGHLY emphasize the importance of yielding to the uphill skier if stopped. It's happened to me more times than I can count; a beginner or child and parent stopped on a trail while I'm in my line. They then proceed to drift out into my line without looking because they have this perception that the downhill skier is bullet proof. Or they will look and see me coming down and proceed to cut me off anyway.

In beginner trails I acknowledge this as a common occurrence, and I adjust my skiing. But there is no excuse for it on advanced terrain. Advanced terrain is for advanced skiers and riders. I don't mind at all if someone skis out of their skill level, that is how you get good. However they should be obligated to yield to the uphill skier as well as the downhill.

All too many times I've had a pissed off father puff his chest out to me in front of his kids for "getting too close" on an advanced trail. I usually will keep my distance from these people, but on advanced terrain there are typically more variations in the grade, I can sometimes not see them stopped on the side of the trail hiding behind a whale or in other defilade.

What do you guys think? While driving we look over our shoulders before changing lanes, how come in skiing the driver is not obligated to do so?
 

dmc

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Dude... I've been singing this song for years now...

and surprise - it's not gone over well on AZ.. This should get interesting...

:spin:
 

steamboat1

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I think your scenario is pretty much covered in the code already.


  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
 

Bene288

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I know it is covered technically in the skiers and riders etiquette. But it's not drilled into the heads of beginners like I think it should be. Like I said, there's this perception that no matter what, the uphill skier assumes all responsibility.
 

Edd

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If I'm skiing in, say, a 12 ft wide self imposed corridor, and then want to break pattern and turn wider, I'll always give a quick look behind me before initiating.

That's as much about my own survival as courtesy towards others. It won't do me much good to complain about the guy behind me not following the code if he flattens me because I couldn't be bothered to take a quick peek behind me.
 

dmc

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You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
Why does this matter if the uphill skier is ALWAYS responsible for what's happening down hill?



Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Again... Why does this matter if the uphill skier is ALWAYS responsible for what's happening down hill?
 

Cheese

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I think your scenario is pretty much covered in the code already.


  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

This. I think most guests at any resort never read the code, have overheard the second item and figure that's all there is. On the other hand, most of us that ski fast and think we are in control may not like to hear that we weren't as much in compliance with the first item as we thought.


  • Always stay in control, and be able to stop or avoid other people or objects.
  • People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.
  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.
  • Always use devices to help prevent runaway equipment.
  • Observe all posted signs and warnings. Keep off closed trails and out of closed areas.
  • Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride and unload safely.
 

dmc

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  • People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

Overrides this...



  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Or does it?
 

Edd

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  • People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

Overrides this...



  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Or does it?

I think you can look at this as a shared responsibility. Just because the uphill skier must avoid the downhill one does not mean the downhill one can be a mindless ding dong and ignore everything behind him.

No doubt certain collisions fall into a gray area in terms of who is at fault.
 

dlague

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  • People ahead of you have the right of way. It is your responsibility to avoid them.

Overrides this...



  • You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
  • Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Or does it?

I think the first point if for skiers and riders in motion the last two are relating to skiers and riders stopping or starting back up from being stopped.
 

dmc

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And that's not a blast about what you think...

It just the fact that the word think is used... We show KNOW what's right...
 

dlague

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As someone pointed out earlier, the code does address this but most do not know the code. But I think they should have something for

Changing your course then check behind you.
Do not go on trails that are above your ability.
 

wa-loaf

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There just need to be signs up everywhere that say "WATCH OUT FOR THE OTHER GUY!"
 

drjeff

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I think you can look at this as a shared responsibility. Just because the uphill skier must avoid the downhill one does not mean the downhill one can be a mindless ding dong and ignore everything behind him.

No doubt certain collisions fall into a gray area in terms of who is at fault.

Exactly! Just like when driving a car, you're not supposed to merge into a lane of traffic if YOU are going to impede the progress of that car already in the line of traffic, so you wait until there's a sufficient distance to merge into traffic before going.

Same thing on snow, if you're stopped, you're not supposed to merge back into the flow going down the hill unless there's ample space.

Also, just like in a car, if you're moving and approaching a car who is stopped, it's your responsibility to either a) stop behind that stopped car ahead of you, or b) avoid that stopped car ahead of you.

It's all about being aware of your surroundings and then using some common courtesy
 

dmc

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Exactly! Just like when driving a car, you're not supposed to merge into a lane of traffic if YOU are going to impede the progress of that car already in the line of traffic, so you wait until there's a sufficient distance to merge into traffic before going.

Same thing on snow, if you're stopped, you're not supposed to merge back into the flow going down the hill unless there's ample space.

Also, just like in a car, if you're moving and approaching a car who is stopped, it's your responsibility to either a) stop behind that stopped car ahead of you, or b) avoid that stopped car ahead of you.

It's all about being aware of your surroundings and then using some common courtesy

true...
but that's not what it says...
 

steamboat1

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You must not stop where you obstruct a trail, or are not visible from above.
Why does this matter if the uphill skier is ALWAYS responsible for what's happening down hill?



Whenever starting downhill or merging into a trail, look uphill and yield to others.

Again... Why does this matter if the uphill skier is ALWAYS responsible for what's happening down hill?

If you can't figure it out you're dumber than I thought.
 
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