• Welcome to AlpineZone, the largest online community of skiers and snowboarders in the Northeast!

    You may have to REGISTER before you can post. Registering is FREE, gets rid of the majority of advertisements, and lets you participate in giveaways and other AlpineZone events!

Electric Cars/Trucks and winter weather testing with results. What do you think? Who has taken one in Freezing cold long distance to a Ski mountain?

MidnightJester

Active member
Joined
Oct 7, 2011
Messages
913
Points
43
To the people that it works with most of them drive less then 100 miles each way, Usually, Not all but most. That works. Driving beyond the battery packs range is Risky in the cold just too many real life stories and articles to say otherwise.

Yes there are articles and testimonials that show it does work in the cold but they are cherry picking the trip and charging locations & times usually and that doesn't work for the spur of the moment and off times. Wasting even a single hour to charge a EV car while MID-trip once is not really acceptable to me,

How do you work on a Snow trip with limited charge going or coming from the Mountain and there is a (2,3,4) Hour delay on the access roads and surrounding highways. You can stop and get a tank of gas at enough locations or even be brought gas on the road. The same is far far from the current truth of EV vehicles. One day maybe but not now and not in the frozen long term cold. A 100% or dead EV in a parking lot and even in a CHARGING LOT or on the side of the road cant be recharged "YET" where it is. Needs to be towed away.

Some, Most EV's brick themselves to protect the EV battery nearing total discharge. No recharging where it sits.
Most if not all dealers charge to un-brick and to get a EV's battery to again accept a charge if you screw up. Hundreds and Hundreds if not Thousands with a TOW.
 
Last edited:

VTSkiBike

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
59
Points
18
Location
Sugarbush & MRG
To the people that it works with most of them drive less then 100 miles each way, Usually, Not all but most. That works. Driving beyond the battery packs range is Risky in the cold just too many real life stories and articles to say otherwise.

Yes there are articles and testimonials that show it does work in the cold but they are cherry picking the trip and charging locations & times usually and that doesn't work for the spur of the moment and off times. Wasting even a single hour to charge a EV car while MID-trip once is not really acceptable to me,

How do you work on a Snow trip with limited charge going or coming from the Mountain and there is a (2,3,4) Hour delay on the access roads and surrounding highways. You can stop and get a tank of gas at enough locations or even be brought gas on the road. The same is far far from the current truth of EV vehicles. One day maybe but not now and not in the frozen long term cold. A 100% or dead EV on the side of the road cant be recharged where it is. Needs to be towed away

Just get pull a gas generator and some jerry cans behind your EV. Cold weather range problems solved.
 

drjeff

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 18, 2006
Messages
19,247
Points
113
Location
Brooklyn, CT
There are so many EVs around Southern VT I don’t think it’s the problem you guess it is.

this Thread is still so funny.
A Tesla owning friend of mine, told me that there were multi "charger stalkers" camped out near the bank of Tesla chargers (I think there's about a half dozen of them) waiting for one to open up, especially on Sunday, when the crowds were BIG. He actually got a "please be kind and move your vehicle when done charging so others can use the charger" official note on his car on Sunday......

And yes, there are plenty of EV's around So VT on a daily basis, with typically enough charging stations (either at their residencies or various businesses) to handle the usual need, however, when you get a BUSY ski day (word on the street was Mount Snow had over 10k people on the hill on Sunday), some of whom are day tripping with their EV's to the area, that certainly can put a strain on the available infrastructure, especially when some weather rolls in, like happened on Sunday afternoon, and it's not like it makes any sense to install say 100 charging stations, for the less than a handful of days a year when there might be the demand for that many
 

letitsnow1

Active member
Joined
Jan 14, 2024
Messages
153
Points
28
I think someone should make a hybrid that is an ev with a generator instead of a battery. Best of both worlds. Heavy equipment even new snow groomers are designed like that. Evs may be the future but lithium ion batteries are not.
 

SkiingInABlueDream

Active member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
801
Points
28
Location
the woods of greater-Waltham
I think someone should make a hybrid that is an ev with a generator instead of a battery. Best of both worlds. Heavy equipment even new snow groomers are designed like that. Evs may be the future but lithium ion batteries are not.
🤔this would actually be the worst of all worlds.

Edit. If you're not storing electrical energy then there's no benefit to the electric drivetrain in cars.

Or, were you thinking of capacitors instead of batteries?
 

letitsnow1

Active member
Joined
Jan 14, 2024
Messages
153
Points
28
🤔this would actually be the worst of all worlds.

Edit. If you're not storing electrical energy then there's no benefit to the electric drivetrain in cars.

Or, were you thinking of capacitors instead of batteries?
Its more efficient and reliable than a normal ICE vehicle and less moving parts with electric motors at each wheel. No transmission differential etc. And you get instat power like an electric car. Lots of new caterpillar heavy equipment is designed like this. Killington bought a groomer like this they claimed it uses 40% less diesel.
 

SkiingInABlueDream

Active member
Joined
Aug 2, 2006
Messages
801
Points
28
Location
the woods of greater-Waltham
Its more efficient and reliable than a normal ICE vehicle and less moving parts with electric motors at each wheel. No transmission differential etc. And you get instat power like an electric car. Lots of new caterpillar heavy equipment is designed like this. Killington bought a groomer like this they claimed it uses 40% less diesel.
What is powering the electric motors in your concept?
 

letitsnow1

Active member
Joined
Jan 14, 2024
Messages
153
Points
28
A gas or diesel generator. it's proven to work in heavy equipment, why not passenger vehicles?
 

BodeMiller1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2022
Messages
1,791
Points
63
Location
Barre, VT
At this point looks like charging stations need to be indoors where the weather can get cold. And you need to keep an EV in a heated garage. At bear minimum a heater on the oil pan like a diesel. On ward and sideways...✨
 

BodeMiller1

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 7, 2022
Messages
1,791
Points
63
Location
Barre, VT

what a PITA
Some humans operate better at low temperatures. 😎

Humans make choices on how to react to weather changes. Cars can't think on the fly. It's all about the batteries. Butt, we all know that.

Humans feel bad when they run over a squirrel, cars just "think" it's another bump in the road.
 

MidnightJester

Active member
Joined
Oct 7, 2011
Messages
913
Points
43
Hmmmmmm EV owners are lucky that more people don't already have EV's. There is already when in High demand not enough Charging or Working fully Charging spots

Mr. Spencer, 27, said he set out on Sunday for a charging station with 30 miles left on his battery. Within minutes, the battery was dead. He had to have the car towed to the station. “When I finally plugged it in, it wasn’t getting any charge,” he said. Recharging the battery, which usually takes Mr. Spencer an hour, took five hours.

That morning, Nick Sethi, a 35-year-old engineer in Chicago, said he had found his Tesla frozen shut. He spent an hour in minus 5-degree temperatures struggling with the locks. Finally, he was able to chisel out the embedded trunk handle to open it, clambering in and driving his Model Y Long Range S.U.V. five miles to the closet supercharging station. He joined a long line of Tesla drivers. All 12 charging posts were occupied, with drivers slowing the process down slightly by staying inside their vehicles with the heat on high.

In normal conditions, Ms. Rivera’s car can drive up to 273 miles on a single, charge. This week, Ms. Rivera said she has awaken to find about a third of her car battery drained from the overnight cold. As temperatures plummeted, she spent hours every morning waiting in line and recharging the battery.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Edd

Smellytele

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 30, 2006
Messages
9,996
Points
113
Location
Right where I want to be
Hmmmmmm EV owners are lucky that more people don't already have EV's. There is already when in High demand not enough Charging or Working fully Charging spots

Mr. Spencer, 27, said he set out on Sunday for a charging station with 30 miles left on his battery. Within minutes, the battery was dead. He had to have the car towed to the station. “When I finally plugged it in, it wasn’t getting any charge,” he said. Recharging the battery, which usually takes Mr. Spencer an hour, took five hours.

That morning, Nick Sethi, a 35-year-old engineer in Chicago, said he had found his Tesla frozen shut. He spent an hour in minus 5-degree temperatures struggling with the locks. Finally, he was able to chisel out the embedded trunk handle to open it, clambering in and driving his Model Y Long Range S.U.V. five miles to the closet supercharging station. He joined a long line of Tesla drivers. All 12 charging posts were occupied, with drivers slowing the process down slightly by staying inside their vehicles with the heat on high.

In normal conditions, Ms. Rivera’s car can drive up to 273 miles on a single, charge. This week, Ms. Rivera said she has awaken to find about a third of her car battery drained from the overnight cold. As temperatures plummeted, she spent hours every morning waiting in line and recharging the battery.
Well seems only people who don't have their own chargers at home are the ones to get fucked.
 
Top