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Questions about flat spots at Gore Mountain

Breakout12

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Hi.

I've read many times about the flat spots on the Cloud/Lower Cloud trail at Gore Mountain. I've also watched some vids
on Youtube, but I still can't get a good perspective on some of the terrain. So, could someone please help me with some
questions?

1) Just how flat are they? Is it possible to glide all the way through, or will you come to a dead stop without poling/skating?
2) How many flat spots are there, and how long are they?
3) Where are they located?


I've included links to the Gore trail map and a vid that follows the trail. If anyone feels up to it, perhaps they could locate certain scenes in the vids to the trail map.

http://www.goremountain.com/mountain/trailmap.cfm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dqp6pf6au90

There are some points where I swear the camera guy is going uphill!

On a related note, what do you feel is the best path from top to bottom? I'd like to find the longest uninterrupted run.

Feel free to add any information you feel is relevant.

Thanks
 

Cornhead

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There are two summits at Gore. The first is the top of the gondola. From there you ski down to the Staightbrook Quad on Pine Knot, or Uncas, to access the other "summit". Chatiemac and Hawkeye can be skied right off the quad. To access Rumor, Lies, Upper Darby, Open Pit, and Cloud, a minimal amount of uphill traversing is required. To return to the base, you can ski to the Topridge Triple via Tannery, then ski Foxlair. If you continue on Cloud, some poling/skating is required to return to the Saddle Lodge. The flats can be nothing, or a pita, depending on conditions. It helps to straightline the last drop to pick up as much speed as possible. I don't think I've ever made it without some poling or skating.
 

Bene288

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I don't think it's too terrible. From what I've found, the worst flat/inclined spot is either Cedars Traverse (going to the Burnt Ridge quad) or Lower Wood Travers (to the High Peaks double). There's a few spots where the High Peaks double and Straight Brook quad empty that you may have to skate a bit. I know there's a trail near the Killkare glades that's inclined and requires a bit of skating but I can't remember which one. If it helps, I hear snowboarders complaining pretty regularly on the lifts about the flats.

As for longest interrupted run, it's got to be something like Cloud to Lower Cloud to Twister. That has to be all 2 or 3 miles. Sagamore and Echo are also pretty long. Those trails aren't difficult but you feel the burn in your legs afterward for sure
 

mattchuck2

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1) Just how flat are they? Is it possible to glide all the way through, or will you come to a dead stop without poling/skating?
2) How many flat spots are there, and how long are they?
3) Where are they located?

1 - They're pretty flat. It is possible to glide all the way through, but you have to know where to tuck and you need perfect conditions (recent icing). A lot of the time, a couple of good hard pushes will get you through, but if it has snowed recently, it can be a slog.
2 - There's a few flat spots, and they vary in length (see below).
3 - Flat spots are the spot on Cloud that you mentioned (especially after Ruby Run enters - there is a slight uphill), the entire first part of Cedars (which is rough from the base lodge, but fine coming from Echo), Wood In (which is flat no matter what way you slice it), Wood Out (which is actually fine if you just have a little speed going in), the top of the mountain (getting from the Hawkeye/Chatiemac area over to the Darkside - generally the most annoying because even locals have to use this one and there's no other way), and Pipeline (which is generally a pain, and should only be used if you HAVE to get to the Ski Bowl and the Barkeater glades aren't open).
 

Cornhead

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I don't think it's too terrible. From what I've found, the worst flat/inclined spot is either Cedars Traverse (going to the Burnt Ridge quad) or Lower Wood Travers (to the High Peaks double). There's a few spots where the High Peaks double and Straight Brook quad empty that you may have to skate a bit. I know there's a trail near the Killkare glades that's inclined and requires a bit of skating but I can't remember which one. If it helps, I hear snowboarders complaining pretty regularly on the lifts about the flats.

As for longest interrupted run, it's got to be something like Cloud to Lower Cloud to Twister. That has to be all 2 or 3 miles. Sagamore and Echo are also pretty long. Those trails aren't difficult but you feel the burn in your legs afterward for sure
I forgot about the new lift, it is a long slog from the base area. I've read you can access it from above through the trees.
 

Harvey

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There is no getting around it. It you want to ski the entire mountain at Gore, you may inadvertently get some exercise. Many are against the recent terrain expansions for this reason. In the 60s there was far less terrain and there were no flat spots in Gore Mountain's topography.
 

jfrenchu

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To me its not that bad as a skiier and a guy who doesn't mind getting a little workout as I could use it.It was a little bit of an issue when my kids were small and learning to snowboard.They would get caught a little bit more.All things considered Gore is my go to mtn,Its pros far outweigh the cons.
 

Cornhead

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To me its not that bad as a skiier and a guy who doesn't mind getting a little workout as I could use it.It was a little bit of an issue when my kids were small and learning to snowboard.They would get caught a little bit more.All things considered Gore is my go to mtn,Its pros far outweigh the cons.
+1, Gore is the first "big" mountain I ever skied, it holds a special place in my heart. There are places that are far more boarder unfriendly, Burke comes to mind.
 

riverc0il

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+1, Gore is the first "big" mountain I ever skied, it holds a special place in my heart. There are places that are far more boarder unfriendly, Burke comes to mind.
Just because of East Bowl?

I didn't notice the flats of Gore when I skied there. I don't mind a flat out to connect the dots. What I didn't care for was everything on the lower mountain serviced by the Gondola. I have no use for low pitch beginner friendly terrain. I'd rather ski a flat out between pods than a long beginner run.
 
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