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How about something different

kingslug

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This is like the one i have..My miter saw is used for different purposes..this thing can cut wide boards..miter saw is 6 inch tops
 

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uphillklimber

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I likethat. Many folks use a sliding miter saw that cuts wider boards easily, full 1X12's. Of course they cost more than the little ones that cut only 6". (I have one of each).
 

uphillklimber

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Looks like that sled works well. Again, just my $0.02, but that looks big and unwieldy to me. But as I have said, it needs to work for the person using it, not me.
 

kingslug

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Prevents a kickback from nailing you. I find the table saw to be the most dangerouse thing in the shop. I bought a huge Sawstop at my last job so no one would cut their fingers off. That thing was great. Five thoudand dollars great but it saved us so much time. Before that they were using a little Dewalt portable and trying to cut full sheet plywood. OY. Now I need to build an outfeed table.
 

uphillklimber

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Prevents a kickback from nailing you. I find the table saw to be the most dangerouse thing in the shop. I bought a huge Sawstop at my last job so no one would cut their fingers off. That thing was great. Five thoudand dollars great but it saved us so much time. Before that they were using a little Dewalt portable and trying to cut full sheet plywood. OY. Now I need to build an outfeed table.

When cutting wide boards as shown, you certainly need to do something to prevent kickbacks. It only takes a little movement on a long board laid sideways like that to squeeze the blade and cause a kickback. Not that it is impossible for it to happen when ripping a board, especially when a board has some stress in it, but it is a whole lot less likely to happen.

A large shop or bench saw is one of those things most of drool over, especially with an outfeed table, but you need space to set it up. Something many of us lack in our shops, if we have one.

I've seen people cutting whole sheets of plywood with a portable table saw. Happens a lot on jobsites where tools are trucked in and out moreso than in shops where tools can be set up and spread out. This is where I much prefer a shooting board. I find it easier and safer than running a 4X8 sheet of plywood or melamine over a portable saw. Not that any of the tools couldn't do the job, it is a balance of effectiveness and safety.
 

BenedictGomez

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Prevents a kickback from nailing you. I find the table saw to be the most dangerouse thing in the shop.

My father-in-law had a kickback last week on a table saw and almost lost his thumb. Deep gash to the bone, but didnt go through. I have no idea how the heck it happened, but they're snowbirds & will be returning to Vermont this week so I'll hear the story soon. And he has over 40 years in construction so it's not like he has no idea what he's doing.

I've seen people cutting whole sheets of plywood with a portable table saw...... I find it easier and safer than running a 4X8 sheet of plywood or melamine over a portable saw.

Curious how do the get a straight cut moving such a huge piece of wood over such a tiny saw (I'm assuming the portable table saw is only about a meter wide)? Do they build up structure even with the table saw's table on both sides of the plywood?
 

uphillklimber

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Curious how do the get a straight cut moving such a huge piece of wood over such a tiny saw (I'm assuming the portable table saw is only about a meter wide)? Do they build up structure even with the table saw's table on both sides of the plywood?

That is exactly what they did, and they would often cut it themselves, no help. I kinda just walked away, not wanting to see it or distract them. The table saws used were basically 20" by 30".

Pretty much, while a table saw "can" be used for crosscuts, a power miters was is so much better for the job. Especially when doing a double miter cut. It doesn't take long to learn how to use a power miter saw and get comfortable with it. I've had guys working for me who knew how to run a table saw, and pretty much were adverse to change or learning something new, I'm just not sure. But I watched , and quickly walked away, as one tried to cross cut a twelve foot 2X12 at 4 feet long at 45 degrees. You could see his as muscled bulging as he maintained balance on the board as it was cut thru, ever so slowly. When he finished, I took him to our power miter box and made the same cut in seconds with no stress and suggested he learn to use this machine.

That being said, if you have room in a shop for a huge platform surface, especially with some of those new vacuum suction devices to securely hold the material while a computer guides the material over the blade, well... yeah, we wish we all had one of those.

In my shop, I have 24' long wall, with lower cabinets in it, a great place to store tools and keep them dust free, thus making for easier cleanup when finished. At about the 8 mark, I have a lower cabinet, and my chop saws sit in there, and their surface is flush with the rest of the counter top. I can trim the end of a 16' board, or cut it in half.
 

kingslug

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I'm going to build an outfeed and infeed table out of pressure treated 2x4 and plywood since it will live outside. I just lengthened my shop by double but don't want to create dust hell down there as the gym and stereo live there. I do have a whole house vacuum system that we do not use so I can convert that to a dust collector by adding a cyclonic separator.
I'm still in sheetrock hell at the moment though.
 

uphillklimber

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Sheetrock hell! It is a heart breaker, eh? Professionals who do it all the time can knock it out in a week. For use weekenders, it's 3 weeks easy, sometimes even longer..... No apparent progress for all those weeks.....

I hear you about the dust. I was so happy at my last house that I had a large garage and could park the cars in the driveway and build things. But.... so much dust found it's way into the house thru the door and me tracking etc.... My current shop is about 50 feet from my house. And I still had to vacuum the entry rug when I was finished.:-?
 

kingslug

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I have a big Gazebo that I don't know what to do with..It has power and 2 ceiling fans so..If I can secure it , it could be a good place for a miter station.
The prob I'm having with the sheetrocking is the soffits I made and the corners..and I'm not doing a ceiling so its exposed. A weird situation. ! 1/8 pine corner trim is your friend for this..covers everything very nicely. The metal corner guards are a pain to get right.
 

Boxtop Willie

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Spent my life with rental real estate and house renovation. Do much of the repair and reno work myself. However, sheetrocking is why God invented those professionals. Short money, excellent results, way less angst. Mudding only looks easy.
 

Siliconebobsquarepants

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Spent my life with rental real estate and house renovation. Do much of the repair and reno work myself. However, sheetrocking is why God invented those professionals. Short money, excellent results, way less angst. Mudding only looks easy.

And most of them have a fierce devotion to alcohol. I happened to have one teach me a few tricks after he noticed my lack of skills while renovating a bathroom. Like an old episode of WKRP in Cincinnati where Johny fevers reaction time improves the more he drinks . Two beers and I’m in the zone .
 

mister moose

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... sheetrocking is why God invented those professionals. Short money, excellent results, way less angst. Mudding only looks easy.
Mudding is easy. Anyone can slap up 6 coats in 12 times the man hours and sand forever. The pros do it on stilts in 3 coats at mach speed and never have to do it over. What's your time and lungs worth?

Moose tip:
Compound and paint under 1000W lights and get your face in it under 2 feet from the surface. Then in normal light 10 feet away it's gorgeous.
 

kingslug

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These have been my nightmares. Because the ceiling will remain unfinished and theres ductwork and piping everywhere..trying to get all this smooth and level and the corners right..has been a bit difficult
 

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kingslug

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I'm done. Actually came out good once I painted everything. Now just have to sand down the stairs and recoat them. Don't know what to do with the ceiling..Its huge. I sprayed an area of it white..but if there is even a tiny hole in the plastic tarps..it goes everywhere.
 

kingslug

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Million times better than it was..
Now time for real woodworking
 

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