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How about something different

kingslug

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My basement is down a 25 degree hill so getting anything down there is a task. Just carrying sheetrock down that hill is a pain..and thats the lightweight stuff. I don't know how I would get something truly heavy down there. Now at my last job at the WTC I build a machine shop by myself. 2600 pound milling machine..big lathes..500 pound tables. A Johnson bar and some steel dollies..oh and a big Gantry for the milling machine. Everyone was like..how the hell did you move this shit..my answer was always " The jews built the pyramids..we know how to do this"...
 

mister moose

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Pretty much. My introduction was a very cheesy affair on my Dad's Skillsaw that was a wobbly bar and the guide was as long as your pinky finger, with a max rip of maybe 6 inches. Poor results, you might as well just follow the line. I bought an aftermarket one that fits my Dewalt, the guide is maybe 9 inches long and is rock solid. That Kreg unit you listed looks primo.

I'm looking ahead to completing my table project and not sure how I'm going to edge it without a track saw. Make a jig? Make a pattern and follow it with a flush cutting router bit? Just clamp a guide board?
 

kingslug

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Very easy to make..pretty much a long board wide enough for the saw to ru n on..and another board attached to it that you rip with the saw..then you have created a perfect edge to cut with..you can make them as long as you want but have to get the second board perfectly square with the track board.
 

Dickc

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Very easy to make..pretty much a long board wide enough for the saw to ru n on..and another board attached to it that you rip with the saw..then you have created a perfect edge to cut with..you can make them as long as you want but have to get the second board perfectly square with the track board.

Personally I like the 8 foot angle iron I bought some years ago. Clamp it to any board, and rip away. Straight as an arrow that lumber never is. Lumber ALWAYS warps!
 

BenedictGomez

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That Kreg unit you listed looks primo.

I think I'll get it. I've been using a speed square pressed against the saw's shoe, but that's a poor man's solution.

Personally I like the 8 foot angle iron I bought some years ago. Clamp it to any board, and rip away. Straight as an arrow that lumber never is. Lumber ALWAYS warps!

That's a clever idea as well.
 

uphillklimber

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Concerning the " shooting boards". the 4' and 8' guides clamped to the board you wish to rip, I have a couple suggestions. First, never us an actual board, because, as stated, they will always warp. Use plywood or tempered hardboard.

Tempered hardwood works well for the bottom piece, that actually contacts the wood to be cut, as it is fairly thin (I prefer the 1/4" thick as opposed to 1/8" thick). This allows you to be able to cut down something as thick as a door, should you need to from time to time. it is not uncommon to have to trim a door bottom after a floor job or rug install. I keep a 4' guide handy for just such a job. I even keep one handy when we are sheathing a building, using 3/4" plywood, for durability, as during framing and sheathing, things get handled a bit rough. I do have an 8' shooting board, using 3/4" plywood as the bottom piece, as I am unlikely to need to trim a door, typically only cutting materials 3/4" thick.

For the guide atop the tempered hardboard or plywood, I use a 3/4" plywood strip. I make sure the plywood guide strip is as wide as the motor hanging over the guide, and that the base material is an inch or so wider, allowing me to clamp the guide in place without the saw running into it.


I have made the guide strip an inch wider, but every now and them, I clamp a little too close and the saw motor runs into the clamp, so the base extending out works better. Sometimes, depending on the configuration of your saw, you may need a relief cut on the guide strip to fit the contours of your motor.




Pretty much, the first cut you make with your shooting board will trim you shooting board. Make it a nice clean smooth cut with a good sharp blade. If your saw base is 6" wide, make sure you 6 1/2" or 7" of the plywood beyond the guide strip. First cut trims it exactly. Sand off any burrs or splinters very gently.

When you need to cut anything, measure and mark at both ends and clamp the guide right on the marks (Waste wood beyond the guide, project wood under the guide). Perfect cut every time.

Back to sheathing. Most times, this kind of accuracy is not needed. Many will use a T-square and free hand cut the sheathing. If you are doing this all day, you will be sharpening and going thru pencils, and every now and then, maybe a cut isn't quite right. And it is easy enough to trim off right in place. But my co workers liked being able to give a measurement and having it fit just right and not having to keep a skil saw on the roof, where they have to nail a 2X4 on the roof to keep it from sliding off.

As each saw is different, you'll need one for each saw you have, mark them with a sharpie, B&D, DeWalt, etc... You can also use such a shooting board for a router. Suppose you want a fluted board, with a line or three of grooves going the length of your board.

When trimming a door bottom, using a shooting board will minimize splintering of the veneer if you are trimming a veneer door, as the shooting board holds the veneer down as you cut it. You can also pre-score the veneer with a sharp knife blade to better assure this does not happen, but be careful not to cut into the shooting board.

Once you make one of these and start using them, you'll use them all the time.
 

kingslug

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Perfect. right now I get the store to cut the boards at least in half so I can work with them. 8x4 3/4 ply is no fun to cut down..MDF even worse. Have to pick up an 8x4 peice of styrofoam insulation as a cutting board.
Now I'm painting the whole basement after my miserable sheetrock job. Then base molding..then spray the ceiling..a job I dread but it will look good and its a cheap option I don't need a permit for.
 

kingslug

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Crap..Long 3 days so far. Finished sheetrocking..primed and painted the whole basement. Now putting in the base molding and others. Coping inside corners is...fun? Thank god I have a good lumber store nearby and not just Home Depot.
 

mister moose

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Concerning the " shooting boards". the 4' and 8' guides clamped to the board you wish to rip, I have a couple suggestions. First, never us an actual board, because, as stated, they will always warp. Use plywood or tempered hardboard...

Thanks for that informative post. I have a long piece of scrap plywood I figured I'd use for the base. And I've used clamped boards for a guide before, but if you don't keep the pressure just so on the saw, the cut can drift. I've seen plans for a 2 sided shooting board, where the slot is contained inside the base, guides on both sides so its more of a rail effect. Ever tried that?

Now I'm painting the whole basement after my miserable sheetrock job.

Ugh. Takes me untold hours to hang, tape and compound, and it's not as good a job. If its bigger than a sheet or two, I'm paying a pro to do it. My last remodel project sheetrock was the only thing I hired out.

Coping inside corners is...fun?
That's what painters caulk is for.

[SUB][SUP]
[/SUP][/SUB]
 

uphillklimber

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Thanks for that informative post. I have a long piece of scrap plywood I figured I'd use for the base. And I've used clamped boards for a guide before, but if you don't keep the pressure just so on the saw, the cut can drift. I've seen plans for a 2 sided shooting board, where the slot is contained inside the base, guides on both sides so its more of a rail effect. Ever tried that?


There are a couple things to consider when doing a slot cut as you ask. I have done them before, but they were for very specific mas production models. Say you want to cut a board at 3 feet long. You would need a 4' shooting board, or longer. You would need some 6" or more of unslotted guide at each end, simply because you need something to hold the guide base on the other side of the slot. Typically, you'd also have an additional two blocks on the bottom of the guide, that would be spaced 3' apart, to lock onto the stock being cut. Then you would need to do a drop cut into the slot, which takes practice, and even with practice, is tough to do just right.

Short answer, I don't bother with them any more. It took less than an hour to realize all of this was so much easier if I just used a good sharp blade and just kept the saw against the single guide.

The single sided guide also allows you to easily align the shooting board. Say you want to cut the sheet of plywood at 3'. Measure and mark both edges of the plywood at 3', place the edge of your shooting board at 3', and the saw cuts it right there. No need to draw a line all the way across the plywood. On a slotted guide, it's a little harder to see your mark thru the slot.
 

kingslug

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Its funny. If you watch a million you tube vids on this stuff..you get a million ways to do things. Best thing I've built yet is a crosscut sled for the table saw. Now I'm going to try to get the fence from 035 out to 0035 out..and add a sliding stop.
 

BenedictGomez

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Is the crosscut sled for people with table saws who dont want to buy (or dont have additional room for) a miter saw?
 

uphillklimber

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Is the crosscut sled for people with table saws who dont want to buy (or dont have additional room for) a miter saw?

Basically, but I have also worked with folks who would ignore a miter saw right next to them and use the table saw. It's what they know how to run, and either haven't learned how to use a power miter saw or are not comfy with them. Ultimately, the person doing the job decides what tool they want to use to get the job done.
 

kingslug

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Crosscut sled is more versatile than a miter saw..which I have. I can crosscut any size board on it and it provides a zero clearance throat on the blade..something I have to make for when I don't use it.
 

uphillklimber

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Crosscut sled is more versatile than a miter saw..which I have. I can crosscut any size board on it and it provides a zero clearance throat on the blade..something I have to make for when I don't use it.


I'd say it's not. For example, how do you do a combination miter cut on a 16' piece of crown molding? It's real easy on a miter saw. Not saying it can't be done on a table saw, I've seen people do it. All a matter of what the worker is used to and how comfortable they are with the various tools. But I suspect most would prefer to cut the 16" crown with a compound miter on a miter saw.

$0.02
 
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