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My skis are worn out. Any reason I shouldn't get the same skis for next 5 years?

bdfreetuna

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Since 2010 I've had Rossignol Phantom 80s at 185 length and these were a massive improvement over anything I'd skied before.

I have abused the heck out of these skis and it's a wonder they only have some top coat damage, worn edges (that's my bad), scrapes in the base and one small bubble in the base.

Pros:
- Stiff and rugged, high speeds don't phase them
- Maneuverable even at 185 dodging trees and taking on very steep technical terrain is a delight
- Bad-ass looks. They're all black and have a translucent bald Eagle which I'm in love with
- Raised back tip, camber, and a perfect front shovel. Like new skis are still trying to figure out this magic formula.
- They can take a beating
- Very very good in bumps either slipping through them or zipping through them
- Plow through chop very nicely as they have some dampness and weight to them

Cons:
- Suck on glare ice

So I'm thinking possibilities...
1. Atomic Vantage 90 Ti
2. Dynastar Powertrack 89 or 84
3. Get another pair of Rossignol Phantom 80s, same length, better bindings

Option #3 I could do for cheaper, although it's getting near impossible to find these now.

Why should I change skis when I find almost no faults in the one I've become adapted to and love?

Opinions welcome :)
 

eatskisleep

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Why change? Has your ability changed over the past 5 years? Ski technology has also changed. Nothing wrong with the same skis, but there may be better skis out there.
 

VTKilarney

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Has ski technology really changed that much in five years? I'm suspect.
 

bdfreetuna

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I've become a better skier but I was pretty good when I got the skis. I'd say I've grown into making the most out of them. There might be a bit of room to continue to grow into them.

That's the part I'm skeptical of... has ski technology really changed? Maybe for some skis, but are they the best because of it? Does some honeycomb construction make an actually better ski?

The skis I'm looking at seem to have a very similar shape and raised back / camber / not crazy-rocker tip. Seems like I'm looking for the same thing just with a new coat of paint.

So why change? I can't think of a good reason. If my current skis didn't have a little bubble in the bottom I'd sharpen them up for another couple seasons at least.
 

deadheadskier

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The best race skis on the planet will suck on glare ice if not tuned frequently. So, if you want better ice performance, that's on you.

I'm a big fan of my Nordica Steadfast for an East coast do anything ski. They can still be found for cheap.
 

Edd

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I think change is fun. Trying new skis is a good time. I can't see buying the same pair I've been on for years but that's just me.
 

deadheadskier

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I think change is fun. Trying new skis is a good time. I can't see buying the same pair I've been on for years but that's just me.

Normally I agree.

The Steadfast I enjoy so much, I briefly entertained the idea of buying a back up pair to "cellar"
 

bdfreetuna

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I've demoed a few skis over the time I've owned the Phantoms and each time thought they were an interesting novelty but would not have traded them for my Phantoms. I think the last one I demoed was a Rossi Experience 88, which I wasn't impressed with at all.

Since I'm only going to ride 1 pair of skis... 1 ski quiver .. for the forseeable future there's a bit of risk in trying something new. I'm pretty sure I'd enjoy a Dynastar Powertrack or Atomic Vantage although I haven't had a chance to try them.
 

drjeff

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The best race skis on the planet will suck on glare ice if not tuned frequently. So, if you want better ice performance, that's on you.

I'm a big fan of my Nordica Steadfast for an East coast do anything ski. They can still be found for cheap.

Agree 100%!

"Great" ice skis won't be "great" if they're not tuned!!

The amount of performance benefit that can be derived with the proper tuning equipment and about 15 minutes of effort IMHO is worth what you spend to buy the tuning gear 100 times over!! Let alone the simple fact you get to appreciate how well a cold beer goes with the smell of melting ski wax! ;) :beer:
 

drjeff

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Has ski technology really changed that much in five years? I'm suspect.

IMHO depends on what type of skis you're looking at....

Powder skis - not really

Race skis - short of the longer minimum radius on GS skis, not really

Bump skis - not really

Twin tip park/freeride skis - not really

The 1 ski "quiver" slight tip rocker 80-90 underfoot East Coast ski - IMHO YUP!! Way more versatility now than 5yrs ago
 

bdfreetuna

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I might do a demo day.

DrJeff I think Rossi nailed the "1 ski quiver 80-90 East Coast ski with the Phantom. Kind of like how Specialized pretty much nailed it with the mid 2000's Enduro (I still ride a 2004 frame with maxed out parts for lack of seeing anything noticeably better).

As for tuning... we're in agreement on that. I definitely plan to have a bench and wax setup in my home for next season. This is one area I've been seriously slack. Not that I think it's really held me back very much at all, but it's a nice smell and a nice feeling, and yeah edges a little better after a fresh tune.
 

Abubob

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Go to some local ski shops with the expressed intent not to buy - but to discuss. Figure out what is it that you like about your present skis. Flex them - tip, center and tail and the compare to possible skis you might buy. You've got all summer. Take your time.

Demoing probably not necessary and really, unless you're prepared to buy immediately after demoing then why bother?

Buy a ski that flexes like the one's you've got but be prepared for them to be different anyway. Your present pair is worn out? Then new skis will be different no matter what you buy. You've been making micro adjustments on your old skis as they aged. You will similarly make adjustments to your new skis.

Enjoy the process.
 

bdfreetuna

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Go to some local ski shops with the expressed intent not to buy - but to discuss. Figure out what is it that you like about your present skis. Flex them - tip, center and tail and the compare to possible skis you might buy. You've got all summer. Take your time.

Demoing probably not necessary and really, unless you're prepared to buy immediately after demoing then why bother?

Buy a ski that flexes like the one's you've got but be prepared for them to be different anyway. Your present pair is worn out? Then new skis will be different no matter what you buy. You've been making micro adjustments on your old skis as they aged. You will similarly make adjustments to your new skis.

Enjoy the process.

Thanks for this reply. I do have all summer... guess I have time for some hands-on research :)
 

xwhaler

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Wait for 4th of July sales. I picked up 2 new skis last 4th of July...a front side carver/true hardpack ski and an all mtn 90 waist ski.
Bought them both new in wrapped for $350 shipped.
Having a quiver of skis to really best deal with the conditions of the day really was nice this yr.
 

Not Sure

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6 pairs available! Tuna could be set for 30 Years for $1140!

I really hate to buy new skis ! I find a pair I like and stick with them till they die. My past purchase without demo satisfaction rate is about 60%. I was just a one ski guy but not anymore.Having a quiver is really the way to go . Old B2's are great in the bumps but lacking in crud , you're right about the Hell & Backs ! Had I not bought them I wouldn't have known the difference as I skied both pairs the same day. Made the crud fun !
Plus if you break something you a familiar pair to fall back on .

Bubble in base might be repairable with a hypodermic needle an some epoxy ? But $190 for new skis I'd jump on that!
 
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