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What Kind of Flashlight Do You Use?

ironhippy

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most of the time I use a headlamp. I've got several, and I find them a heck of a lot easier to use then a flashlight for just about everything.

I don't have any recommendations though, mine are all old.
 

JimG.

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most of the time I use a headlamp. I've got several, and I find them a heck of a lot easier to use then a flashlight for just about everything.

I don't have any recommendations though, mine are all old.

I got a BD headlamp, no idea model#. Got it on sale for $29 seems like a great deal.

A newfound (for me) necessity for fishing at night.
 

Quietman

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Black Diamond Spot. I've had many and this one is worth the extra $. Granted, I got mine as an EMS return for $15.
 

billski

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+1 on the BD headlamp. It's great for using the one-holer in the dark, cooking over the grille in the dark and fixing plumbing under the sink. Used it to extract ticks, look for lice and ambush moose. It's really small, takes 2 AAA which makes it really lightweight and I haven't broken it yet. I led a group of 12 people out of the woods with this headlamp, on a washed out trail with no blazes. Don't ask....
 

JimG.

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My BD is the Cosmo.

It has a main spot perfect for landing the boat or 2 lower intensity LED's great for unhooking fish or tying knots that also turn red.
 

bigbog

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You need a double sized light for Maine. It's darker than most places on the east coast. ;)

You're right Bill, lots of dense softwooded areas with leafy hardwoods. Lots of leafy and rocky bluffs dropping off to wet/moist terrain by brooks.. You can still find em' ~every 2-3miles.
...Not to mention the country roads that extend into the boonies/sticks up here.
...Also keep handy a handheld big one...A-batteries powered. Once I get another 4wd vehicle I'll mod it with some extra lighting. Handy in remote areas.
EDIT: My two Stanley LED bright beam-ers are nice and light.
 
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billski

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Usually I end up using the light on my cell phone...

Sent from my SM-G930F using AlpineZone mobile app

Groan... I know you are half-serious, but lots of people read this, so here's my public-service announcement for lurkers...

As someone leading an effort to reduce Search and Rescue missions in the white mountain, we've lost count of the number of people who believe a cell phone light will be sufficient. TCell phone lights are good for a walk in the park, but with rocks, boulders, roots and trees, it's damn near impossible to get a sense for what's up ahead. I've led teams out in the pitch dark, he woods are darker than you think - they suck up lumens ;) So then when you trip, fall and break your leg from what you didn't see, you'll need to call 911 on your cell phone which is probably losing the battery power necessary for SAR team to geo-locate you. Drop and break it, you're hosed.

We are presently combing through multiple years of SAR data; it's shocking how many people have been lulled into believing that's their answer. One conservation officer told me that if he could stand on top of Franconia ridge and sell flashlights, he'd be rich. People don't realize until it's too late they need a more powerful light. Sad part is you can buy a pretty decent LED light for $10 these days.

Which brings me to my last point. A national forest is not a national park. Very different. a forest has few visitor services, programs, developed areas or ADA-compliant trails. Much of our forest is inaccessible to vehicles and equipment without great effort and expense. That's why the vast majority of the WMNF is called "back country".
 

dlague

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I would not even consider hiking out where I am in the forests in the dark. However we do have and emergency pack with a smaller LED flashlight if by some chance it did get dark while hiking . But my biggest concern are mountain lions. Plus flashlight hiking if you go off track does not help a whole lot but GPS does.

Sent from my SM-G930P using AlpineZone mobile app
 

Hawkshot99

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Groan... I know you are half-serious, but lots of people read this, so here's my public-service announcement for lurkers...

As someone leading an effort to reduce Search and Rescue missions in the white mountain, we've lost count of the number of people who believe a cell phone light will be sufficient. TCell phone lights are good for a walk in the park, but with rocks, boulders, roots and trees, it's damn near impossible to get a sense for what's up ahead. I've led teams out in the pitch dark, he woods are darker than you think - they suck up lumens ;) So then when you trip, fall and break your leg from what you didn't see, you'll need to call 911 on your cell phone which is probably losing the battery power necessary for SAR team to geo-locate you. Drop and break it, you're hosed.

We are presently combing through multiple years of SAR data; it's shocking how many people have been lulled into believing that's their answer. One conservation officer told me that if he could stand on top of Franconia ridge and sell flashlights, he'd be rich. People don't realize until it's too late they need a more powerful light. Sad part is you can buy a pretty decent LED light for $10 these days.

Which brings me to my last point. A national forest is not a national park. Very different. a forest has few visitor services, programs, developed areas or ADA-compliant trails. Much of our forest is inaccessible to vehicles and equipment without great effort and expense. That's why the vast majority of the WMNF is called "back country".
No I was serious, but I don't go hiking. If I did actual hikes I would use a headlamp flashlight so my hands are free. I have a nice one i keep in my truck and one on my motorcycle incase I have issues at night.

Sent from my SM-G930F using AlpineZone mobile app
 

billski

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No I was serious, but I don't go hiking. If I did actual hikes I would use a headlamp flashlight so my hands are free. I have a nice one i keep in my truck and one on my motorcycle incase I have issues at night.

Sent from my SM-G930F using AlpineZone mobile app

The vast majority of in-the-dark hikers are those who did not anticipate the length of their hike nor that light diminishes faster in the woods than on a peak or wide open area. Which is why knowing sunset time is so important. One conservation officer told me he can sit in the parking lot in Franconia Notch and watch a stream of cell phone lights coming out of the woods after sunset.
 

kiliman

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I've always used a Petzl headlamp and still have my trusty original from years ago, which uses 4 AA batteries! These days though, the technology is a lot more advanced, in terms of battery life, weight and efficiency.
 
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