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Did I buy the wrong skis??

JimG.

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I find 185 is a good length for everything. Shorter is easier in the tight trees though. My 191's are big powder boards but have no trouble on groomers..just not solid ice. Long skis on groomers work great..see how long race skis are.
I've read very good things about the Head Kore line. I bought the 117's in 191 length . The 93 width got very good reviews for all conditions.

Go slug!

I am about to pull the string on a pair of Kore 93's along with a pair of 117's for powder days. Will probably go 180 for the 93's and 191 for the 117's.
 

killwhat

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I just changed my daily skis for similar reasons. These days I spend a lot of time skiing with the wife and teaching less experienced skiers so a long/beefy ski was a pain on a daily basis. Last season, I went back to skiing a shorter and less stiff ski, which was a lot more fun.
 

da pimp

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The beauty about the Pinnacle 95 and the entire k2 Pinnacle series is that there is a lot of front rocker, plus a small tail rocker. They ski short, which means they feel like a shorter ski. You will engage most of the ski length at high edge angles, and only a portion of the ski has pressure on it when mostly upright. I have a lot of time on the 95 and 105, older models as well as the gray 2018-2019 version. Standing upright you will pressure only about 150cm of the ski thanks to the early rise rocker.

The more you get them on edge the more the length rewards you with stability. Since they are not stiff, the typical descriptive word is playful. With a 95mm waist and 191cm, it will do everything you want on the East Coast and would be great as a daily ski out west. And they are lighter than comparable brands.

When running the groomers with your wife, try to focus on getting them on edge at slower speeds. You will make effortless round turns, won't intimidate her by ripping away, and you can change your turn shape at will.

As with all rocker skis you don't want to sit back ever. Stay forward and pressure the tips in everything you do and the ski will reward you.
 

mister moose

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The past few years I've been on blizzards which were 180-- pretty snappy skis but borderline too short and beat to sh*t...and I tried out line and rossignol last year which were in the 180 range as well. The 191s are definitely the longest I've had. When I purchase (online) them I felt like I was making the right call, but when they arrived they were longer than expected. I have looked at some other 190's and they didn't feel as big. The pinnacles are relatively light so I'm hoping I still feel as nimble as before. I usually buy new then sell the old ones, but maybe I should just start a collection so I can select the right one for the day

I don't see how 180 is too short for you, and for a strong skier I don't think +10cm is going to make that much difference. 5% longer. A skilled skier should feel the difference, but not be overcome by the difference. One thing worth pointing out is woods and bumps don't elongate for taller skiers. You're skiing a pattern laid down by the average 165 cm skier on the longest pair of skis in that model. So you're further departing the groove.

As Da Pimp said, rockered skis ski short on the flat. However in powder (and when I say powder I'm not talking about a 4 inch freshie) the entire ski is immersed and tracking 100% of the time.

If you recently bought the 2018 model, you must have saved $$, so not a huge loss if you don't like the ski. Consider skiing 2 pairs instead of one. Maybe find an only driven to church on Sundays pair of used Brahmas, since you know and like them.

Looking around some liftlines it seems some guys buy their 1 pair of skis for the 8% of their ski days that are true powder days. That's a heck of a lot of compromising for the other 92%.

As for skiing with your wife, kudos. I say you're doing it right. However, you can sometimes ski the steep fork that rejoins the Blue cruiser. You can sometimes take the double Black and meet at the lift. You can hang back and crank turns at speed to catch up if it isn't crowded. And when she's tired or cold she can go in and you can crank it for 2 or 3 runs.

You say extensive research and trying out a few skis. This year find some demo days and do less research and more trying.

How many days per season do you ski?
 
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prsboogie

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You'll be just fine on the 191s and they do measure long, like 193.5 I think but the rocker kills the length. I say drill'm and rip'm

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using AlpineZone mobile app
 

pauldotcom

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For groomers, shorter skis are better.

Huh? For real? I am 5'10 and wouldn't use a ski under 180cm for groomers. I actually use 180s in the glades/woods/bumps and looking for a little longer for groomers. At you're height, 191 is IDEAL. That is if you really are an expert lol..
 

slatham

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The beauty about the Pinnacle 95 and the entire k2 Pinnacle series is that there is a lot of front rocker, plus a small tail rocker. They ski short, which means they feel like a shorter ski. You will engage most of the ski length at high edge angles, and only a portion of the ski has pressure on it when mostly upright.

Bingo! What length will affect your skiing more - tip to tail, or the amount of edge on the snow? I say the later. And the more rocker, the less edge on the snow. Which is why my rockered up powder skis are about 10cm longer than my cambered front side skis.

Stiffness also plays a roll but I would guess the skis in question are not radically different, but I don know for sure.
 

abc

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Traditional wisdom dictates shorter skis for groomers and trees, longer for pow, blah, blah.
I don’t buy that.

The only time to go “short” is in the trees. On groomer, you can get away with skis “too long” or “too short” easily. Any “expert” should be able to easily adapt to any length of skis on the groomer.
 

mister moose

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Bingo! What length will affect your skiing more - tip to tail, or the amount of edge on the snow? I say the later. And the more rocker, the less edge on the snow. Which is why my rockered up powder skis are about 10cm longer than my cambered front side skis. .

The only time to go “short” is in the trees. On groomer, you can get away with skis “too long” or “too short” easily. Any “expert” should be able to easily adapt to any length of skis on the groomer.

Everything is a compromise. The longer rockered ski will have more swing weight. The rockered ski generally takes higher edge angles to engage, and doesn't engage linearly, meaning the feel changes as the longer edge engages, and the longer rockered edge can feel grabby sometimes in uneven snow.

Even if you're an expert, it isn't about making do, its about maximizing fun. Choose the right ski for the day, or if you only have one ski, buy one that suits you most of the time. For many skiers, that means an "all mountain ski", which means it does everything sorta good and does nothing really good.

If you're skidding turns, you're not as concerned with edge hold. If you're carving turns, that by definition means zero skidding, all edge hold, so length matters. You can overpower a too-short ski.


Each ski does have its own personality, its own unique set of trade-offs, so that's why it's better to ski it before buying it.
 

urungus

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I don’t buy that.

The only time to go “short” is in the trees. On groomer, you can get away with skis “too long” or “too short” easily. Any “expert” should be able to easily adapt to any length of skis on the groomer.

What about bumps ? I am certainly not a mogul expert, but I struggle with longer skis in the troughs of big or tight bumps.
 

kingslug

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I discovered one thing about big fat skis in the bumps..the good bumps not the ice mounds..you can just glide over them as if they aren't there..
 

BenedictGomez

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I discovered one thing about big fat skis in the bumps..the good bumps not the ice mounds..you can just glide over them as if they aren't there..

You mentioned this last year and pretty much everyone disagreed with you. I still dont get it. "Big fat skis" are terrible in moguls. They're pretty much the opposite of what you want. The best mogul skis are relatively short, and have a very tiny waist underfoot.
 

kingslug

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Well..have they ever tried it? So lets say your in Jackson cruising around on a powder day on you fat boards and come across a huge mogul field..Jackson has tons of them. What do you do? I cruise right through them. Regardless of that fact that everyone says it can't be done. I do it all the time out there. Are you doing them "the correct way"..whatever that is..no. But it works for me and is a lot less work. At Stowe last year when it dumped a person I was skiing with who was a very good bump skier said " you dont turn much" Well I don't have to today.
A lot of people out west use these fat skis ALL the time. They get through everything no problem..I ski with them a lot..and they are pretty damn good. I'm just happy to keep up with them. Its where I learned to ski this stuff.The East is different..super hardpack and ice moguls do not like fat boards at all.
 

Bumpsis

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You mentioned this last year and pretty much everyone disagreed with you. I still dont get it. "Big fat skis" are terrible in moguls. They're pretty much the opposite of what you want. The best mogul skis are relatively short, and have a very tiny waist underfoot.
Couldn't agree more. My absolute favorite bumps skis are the ancient ("straight") K2 KV Comps with 63mm waist. They are 185cm and I'm 5'6". The skis are light and super easy to turn in bumps. Alas, my legs are not what they used to be and 4 or 5 bump runs just simply burn up my quads ( yeah, I'm old).
My "regular" everyday skis are 80mm in the waist and although I can take them through a nice mogul field just fine, they are nowhere as fun as the KV comps.
 

BenedictGomez

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Well..have they ever tried it? So lets say your in Jackson cruising around on a powder day on you fat boards and come across a huge mogul field...... I cruise right through them. Regardless of that fact that everyone says it can't be done. I do it all the time out there......a person I was skiing with who was a very good bump skier said " you dont turn much" Well I don't have to today.

I dont even physically understand this.

It seems that you are saying that on fat powder boards you are essentially straight-lining huge mogul fields?

The only thing I can think of when this could be possible is if it's such a powder day that what you are calling "mogul fields" really arent mogul fields.
 

Sirbannedalot

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You ask for advice but, once given you get all bent out of shape. Call me a keyboard warrior yet you are the one calling me a motherfucker. Actually I am married and my lifestyle is working out pretty well. My skiing has increased. Maybe you are the one that made a mistake getting married if your lifestyle had to change so much. Maybe you could have her take a lesson. With how short tempered you are, it's unlikely helping you wife with her skiing will lead to anything good. And yes if you are asking stupid questions like this then you obviously aren't as good as you think you are.

Thanks for your opinion guy, it sounds like you're a real nice dude. Besides, I skied out of the womb mf, I don't need the approval of a keyboard warrior with no friends. Also, when you get married one day, you might understand that your lifestyle has to change if you're expecting it to work out- not that you'll ever be tolerable enough for someone to be interested in you....I digress
 

drjeff

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Well..have they ever tried it? So lets say your in Jackson cruising around on a powder day on you fat boards and come across a huge mogul field..Jackson has tons of them. What do you do? I cruise right through them. Regardless of that fact that everyone says it can't be done. I do it all the time out there. Are you doing them "the correct way"..whatever that is..no. But it works for me and is a lot less work. At Stowe last year when it dumped a person I was skiing with who was a very good bump skier said " you dont turn much" Well I don't have to today.
A lot of people out west use these fat skis ALL the time. They get through everything no problem..I ski with them a lot..and they are pretty damn good. I'm just happy to keep up with them. Its where I learned to ski this stuff.The East is different..super hardpack and ice moguls do not like fat boards at all.

Agree!

Granted I'm not seeking out too many bump runs on a true powder day, but for sure, on a warm, spring bump day, I'm 100% on my powder boards, and me and my Blizzard Cochise's are happy campers.

Now, if we were to talk about "firm" mid winter and/or post freeze up with just a light coating of fresh snow on them bumps, I'd want nothing to do with my powder boards and those types of bumps
 

skiur

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You ask for advice but, once given you get all bent out of shape. Call me a keyboard warrior yet you are the one calling me a motherfucker. Actually I am married and my lifestyle is working out pretty well. My skiing has increased. Maybe you are the one that made a mistake getting married if your lifestyle had to change so much. Maybe you could have her take a lesson. With how short tempered you are, it's unlikely helping you wife with her skiing will lead to anything good. And yes if you are asking stupid questions like this then you obviously aren't as good as you think you are.


Wow, you really seem to be a douche!
 

bdfreetuna

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I dont even physically understand this.

It seems that you are saying that on fat powder boards you are essentially straight-lining huge mogul fields?

The only thing I can think of when this could be possible is if it's such a powder day that what you are calling "mogul fields" really arent mogul fields.

I could be wrong but I think Kingslug is referring to one of the basically 3 ways I'm aware of to ski moguls.

1) zipper line, narrow flexy skis are best
2) slip-zip, basically still using the troughs but also turn/skidding over the top of the bump. Works best in spring or soft snow, any ski will do.
3) skiing moguls as if it's a GS run which involves bigger turns and skiing over the tops of a couple bumps between turns, and variably turning in the trough or over the top of a bump depending on your turn arc. This isn't something you want to do on a <><> run on an icy day..

I ski bumps all 3 ways depending on the conditions and my intentions, using the same skis (90mm Atomics for the last few years). But conditions and terrain dictate this a lot more than my absolute free will in the situation.

My guess is Kingslug didn't start utilizing technique #3 until getting powder boards (which will aid in stability as such).
 

mister moose

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I could be wrong but I think Kingslug is referring to one of the basically 3 ways I'm aware of to ski moguls.

1) zipper line, narrow flexy skis are best
2) slip-zip, basically still using the troughs but also turn/skidding over the top of the bump. Works best in spring or soft snow, any ski will do.
3) skiing moguls as if it's a GS run which involves bigger turns and skiing over the tops of a couple bumps between turns, and variably turning in the trough or over the top of a bump depending on your turn arc. This isn't something you want to do on a <><> run on an icy day..

I ski bumps all 3 ways depending on the conditions and my intentions, using the same skis (90mm Atomics for the last few years). But conditions and terrain dictate this a lot more than my absolute free will in the situation.

My guess is Kingslug didn't start utilizing technique #3 until getting powder boards (which will aid in stability as such).

You can add carve 1 turn per mogul on the shoulder, skarve closer in but not slipping the back face. Infinite variations of all those. Wide range of personal styles and stance. Constantly changing bump shape, spacing, trough depth and bump length. Wide range of snow conditions. Add up all the permutations, and it amazes me that anyone thinks "This ski is good for the bumps" or "This technique works in the bumps" as if there's one ski or one technique. The thing that works best in the bumps is versatility.
 
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