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Strict Ski Patrol at Jay Peak

thetrailboss

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Considering that Jay is still in receivership and lost about 60-80% of its business this year due to the border being shut I would imagine that folks are on a short fuse due to pressure to keep costs down and avoid risks (including cracking down on liabilities). Perhaps ski patrol DID yell at them and they did not hear them. I don't know the facts of what happened so I can't pass any judgment.
 

kbroderick

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I can see ski patrol being more lenient with someone skiing a closed trail and putting only themselves at risk versus straight-lining a trail used by skiers of mixed abilities. The decision to pull the passes of the straight-liner's pals - with or without a warning - does seem draconian, but all we have here is one side of the story. I guess the big lesson here is to never voluntarily hand over a pass to ski patrol.
a) almost every pass I've had included language either on the card or in a waiver about it remaining property of the resort and being required to surrender it if so required
a.i) refusing to hand over a pass or ticket is almost never going to improve the outcome for you
b) skiing closed trails doesn't just endanger you; if you get hurt, guess who gets to come get you? As tempting as it might be to leave someone writhing in pain because they ducked a rope, I don't think it's going to happen.
c) the first set of tracks down a closed trail generally invites more

I'm all for aggressive trail openings and I'll plead the fifth as to whether or not I've ducked ropes, but I understand why it can be a rather touchy subject.

When I was patrolling, I never had need to pull a pass, but (see above) I may be more sympathetic to questionable judgement than some. If the same kids had given me attitude when I called them over, they probably would've ended up without tickets. Had they tried to take off, I think I would've laughed, radioed it in, and then given them a short head start to make it sporting. YMMV, of course.

I'm also on the "we're not hearing the whole story here" bus, until and unless I hear evidence to the contrary. I've worked with patrollers who were draconian, but even for them, the story as relayed would be a bit much.
 

jaytrem

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Most patrollers are great, but every so often you run into an idiot. I think I've had 2 confrontations with patrollers my entire life. Both times they were completely in the wrong.

First time I got yelled at for "ducking a rope" to get a shovel. It was back in the "Bear Trap Bump Off" at Mount Snow. The initial jump build wasn't holding up, so my friend/event organizer asked me to go garb the shovel from the judging area. That area just happened to be surrounded by ropes right near the lift lines. I "duck the rope", grab the shovel and next thing know some moron patroller is giving me a hard time. Let's just say the crowd at the lift was not on his side and I received no penalty. Whole thing was just a ridiculous power play that made no sense.

Second time was when I got yelled at for skiing an open trail. They just opened a crossover from Canyon to the quad at Mount Snow. I got a little stuck near the lift (snowboarding) and some patroller above me on the quad said something. I figured it was probably a patroller friend making a silly comment about me getting stuck, I laughed and gave him a big smile. I guess he didn't like my smile, because when I arrived at the top of the lift he was waiting for me. He immediately (and unprofessionally) ripped into me for skiing a closed trail and just laughing at him when he yelled from the lift. Admittedly that set me off a bit. I called him a few choice words while informing him that the trail was indeed open. I invited him to take a run me with me to check it out, or even go get his supervisor so we can discuss further. He grumbled something about "not having time for this" and skied off. I guess he figured I was probably correct about the trail being open. I just don't get the unprofessional yelling part, don't start with that and we can have a civilized conversation about whether I was skiing on a closed trail or not.

Other than that I've had nothing but great experiences with patrollers. Special shout out to one at Keystone who spent an entire afternoon giving me a tour of the trees and bumps. Guess he didn't want me to get hurt skiing alone. :) Also to Cheryl for hauling me down from Beartrap when I sliced my knee open. She gave me a nice speedy ride, but we did find time to stop for a picture. Local newspaper ended up using it as a stock photo. I am referred to as "occupant" in the caption. Friends got a kick out of that.
 

Domeskier

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a) almost every pass I've had included language either on the card or in a waiver about it remaining property of the resort and being required to surrender it if so required
a.i) refusing to hand over a pass or ticket is almost never going to improve the outcome for you

When your pass is being revoked, handing it over is not voluntary.
 

crank

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Only experience I ever had with Jay patrol was a good one.

Way back in the early '80s before the place was really discovered, before they had glades on the map, my Brother in law and I were skiing a powder morning and there were 2 sets of tracks ahead of us on every trail our first 4 or 5 runs. We eventually caught up to a pair of patrollers on Uller's Dream and they pointed towards present day Beaver Pond and told us if we wanted we could ski the trees down to the xc trail and that would lead us back to the base. We did!

I have skied many a closed run there and never had any issues. Not one to go super fast but if you're gonna do that I would say don't blow by a slow skiing sign.

That said I have had issues with cops and security guards who seemed to have a Napoleon complex or just a really big stick shoved up there ass.
 

jaytrem

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I felt real bad for the patrollers at Snoqualmie the other day. They were dealing with a disagreement between customers that resulted in a bit of an assault. One guy asked another to turn down his radio (curse filled lyrics). He didn't take to kindly to that and argument ensued. Complainer guy's girlfriend/wife takes out a phone to start recording. Radio guy's girlfriend/wife grabs the other girls arm and tries to wrestle the phone from her. Crowd gets a bit involved and radio guy and friends go around the lift to the other line and jump 3/4 of the line. This was Hidden Valley area, so no way out except the lift. Guy behind me vehemently insists patrollers get involved and they do. They looked very reluctant, I'm sure that was not in the job description. Radio guy and friend get to the merge point and patrol asks them to step out of the line, the girlfriend/wife starts screaming about needing to get back to her car. Could still hear the arguing as we rode up the lift. Radio guy screaming something about the other guy should have minded his own f'n business. When we got back to the true base are there were a number of security folk there, I assume waiting for the radio people. Like I said, felt terrible that the patrollers had to deal with that nonsense.

Speaking of radios, when I was as Sugar in NC about a month ago, they had patrollers staffing the lift line for mask checking and also had anybody with a radio turn it off. All the radio offenders that I saw were respectful and complied.

Final note on radios. I've notice there a lot of females with the radios blaring these days. Anyone else notice that? Seems like that used to be a predominantly male thing.
 

dblskifanatic

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I felt real bad for the patrollers at Snoqualmie the other day. They were dealing with a disagreement between customers that resulted in a bit of an assault. One guy asked another to turn down his radio (curse filled lyrics). He didn't take to kindly to that and argument ensued. Complainer guy's girlfriend/wife takes out a phone to start recording. Radio guy's girlfriend/wife grabs the other girls arm and tries to wrestle the phone from her. Crowd gets a bit involved and radio guy and friends go around the lift to the other line and jump 3/4 of the line. This was Hidden Valley area, so no way out except the lift. Guy behind me vehemently insists patrollers get involved and they do. They looked very reluctant, I'm sure that was not in the job description. Radio guy and friend get to the merge point and patrol asks them to step out of the line, the girlfriend/wife starts screaming about needing to get back to her car. Could still hear the arguing as we rode up the lift. Radio guy screaming something about the other guy should have minded his own f'n business. When we got back to the true base are there were a number of security folk there, I assume waiting for the radio people. Like I said, felt terrible that the patrollers had to deal with that nonsense.

Speaking of radios, when I was as Sugar in NC about a month ago, they had patrollers staffing the lift line for mask checking and also had anybody with a radio turn it off. All the radio offenders that I saw were respectful and complied.

Final note on radios. I've notice there a lot of females with the radios blaring these days. Anyone else notice that? Seems like that used to be a predominantly male thing.

Like a bluetooth speaker? Or Radio as in walkie talkie?
 

jaytrem

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Im guessing he means a bluetooth speaker. Seems to always go hand in hand with blaring expletive music.
Correct, I'm old! What the hell is this bluetooth I keep hearing about???
 

jimmywilson69

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No they wear them in a back pack and let everyone hear their typically shitty music

You haven't noticed this the past few years?

With the ladies its usually some terrible modern day country music
 

kingslug

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Nope..not really..not at Stowe SB gore or Hunter..but then again I have heavy metal playing in the noodle bucket so I really cant hear much anyway..But not loud enough for anyone to hear it..and I turn it off on the lift in case anyone talks to me.
 

cdskier

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Nope..not really..not at Stowe SB gore or Hunter..but then again I have heavy metal playing in the noodle bucket so I really cant hear much anyway..But not loud enough for anyone to hear it..and I turn it off on the lift in case anyone talks to me.
I've heard people with speakers a few times at SB this year. Not often, but I have heard it.
 

jaytrem

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I've heard people with speakers a few times at SB this year. Not often, but I have heard it.
Not counting the deserted days I've skied, I'd say 90% of the days I've seen/heard them. One guy at Silver Creek did have some entertaining George Carlin going for a bit. That was a bit odd. Maybe the loudest of the year. Also played Freebird, probably by request.
 
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