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BenedictGomez

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In/Out Burger starting people at $13.50/hr.............corporate jobs aren't paying like the northeast though.

That seems like an odd dichotomy, any explanation for high-paid unskilled jobs with simultaneous low-paid skilled jobs?
 

BenedictGomez

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I've been working remotely on short stink for years. The work efficiency is not a problem at all. It's really the big wigs who are resistant to people working fully remote. (what's ironic, they would push for "off shore" work force in say India or Ireland, but wouldn't let the local work force to work from a couple thousand miles away, in the same time zone!)

I'm definitely one of the "glass half full" type. I think this pandemic WILL break this issue out in the open. So many people working successfully from home. All of them would want to continue this to some degree. The flood gate has opened. They can't hold back the tide any more! :)

OMG, so much all of this. Every bit of it. I work for a company run by white-haired people, and they wanted us ALL back in September, even though I'm not far from the GLOBAL EPICENTER of this nonsense. I cant even understand that. If you have a function that can be 100% done remotely with 0% drop in efficiency, why in god's name would you demand they come back to the building? I hate the expression, "OK Boomer", but "OK Boomer" actually applies here.

It's over. Nobody listens to techno. Start investing in the companies which are the pitchforks & shovels of the Cloud, because those companies are going to be the next to go BOOM! So many terabytes of data are now being created. Someone's gotta' store, manage, backup, compliance, govern, all that crap. MSFT claims it had 2 years of prior projected Teams growth in less than 2 months! Salesforce actually recently gave up on even trying to backup client's data & sent out a memo to their customers saying, "uhhh....guys....get a 3rd party to do this crap". They basically said, screw it & turned away millions of dollars because they're flipping swamped.
 
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KustyTheKlown

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I work in cloud technology for small to mid size law firms. We’ve been booming.

I listen to techno everyday.

The only reason I had no beard pre covid is bc it’s spotty and shitty. It’s a great shame but I don’t care during work from home life
 

thetrailboss

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NEK by Birth; Alta/Snowbird by Choice
IPO this week. Get your limit orders in early.
Re: Airbnb vs. VRBO

Based on my pandemic experience, if you are a unit owner, VRBO is better for you. If you are a consumer, Airbnb is better. We had a terrible experience with a VRBO host in March when this whole thing started. Airbnb immediately refunded all rentals in full. VRBO did nothing and tried to play the, "gee, we're just a middleman" bullshit. Ultimately we got most of our money back but it was clear that the owner was WAY over her head and like some others had built a rental empire with a flimsy foundation that came crashing down when business stopped.
 

abc

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Re: Airbnb vs. VRBO

Based on my pandemic experience, if you are a unit owner, VRBO is better for you. If you are a consumer, Airbnb is better. We had a terrible experience with a VRBO host in March when this whole thing started. Airbnb immediately refunded all rentals in full. VRBO did nothing and tried to play the, "gee, we're just a middleman" bullshit. Ultimately we got most of our money back but it was clear that the owner was WAY over her head and like some others had built a rental empire with a flimsy foundation that came crashing down when business stopped.
Different portfolio, I think.

My impression, VRBO are mostly 2nd home owners who count on the rental income to pay their mortgage. So yes, the house of card can come crashing down when the market dries up.

Airbnb has some of those. But many more of Airbnb owner are renting their unused space/property they've already paid off, or can comfortably carry without the rental income. Part of the reason maybe Airbnb hasn't been around long enough to inspire people building such "rental empire" from the ground up as VRBO has?

It's just a speculation of the top off my head. ;)
 
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thetrailboss

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Different portfolio, I think.

My impression, VRBO are mostly 2nd home owners who count on the rental income to pay their mortgage. So yes, the house of card can come crashing down when the market dries up.

Airbnb has some of those. But many more of Airbnb owner are renting their unused space/property they've already paid off, or can comfortably carry without the rental income. Part of the reason maybe Airbnb hasn't been around long enough to inspire people building such "rental empire" from the ground up as VRBO has?

It's just a speculation of the top of my head. ;)
That’s a good observation
 

BenedictGomez

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Because we have low unemployment and they can't find anyone to work those jobs. That's why.

That the latter half makes perfect sense, but if unemployment is so low, one would presume there will be upward wage pressure on the skilled jobs as well.
 

abc

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That the latter half makes perfect sense, but if unemployment is so low, one would presume there will be upward wage pressure on the skilled jobs as well.
Depends on what level of "skill".

The upper part of the "skill" is only skill based. You can't just pull someone off the street to work in the surgery center like you could to work in the mail room. You can't even put an unemployed nurse to work as a dental hygienist. The only way to increase supply (when population grows increases demand) is to attract someone from out of the area.

Wage level of the white collar job correlate more to housing cost than to unemployment. When the "real" income looks good, the professionals move in. So as long as housing cost is low, wage for white collar professionals won't move up.

Conversely, when contemplating relocation, don't expect to get the northeast level of pay in Utah. Look instead at what portion of your salary you get to keep. One of my co-worker relocated 2 years ago. They were the perfect example, one of the partner works in IT, the other a bike mechanic. The bike mechanic got a wage increase, the IT specialist took a pay cut. But after only a year there, they bought a pretty big house which they would never dreamt of in Brooklyn (NY)
 
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jimk

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Depends on what level of "skill".

The upper part of the "skill" is only skill based. You can't just pull someone off the street to work in the surgery center like you could to work in the mail room. You can't even put an unemployed nurse to work as a dental hygienist. The only way to increase supply (when population grows increases demand) is to attract someone from out of the area.

Wage level of the white collar job correlate more to housing cost than to unemployment. When the "real" income looks good, the professionals move in. So as long as housing cost is low, wage for white collar professionals won't move up.

Conversely, when contemplating relocation, don't expect to get the northeast level of pay in Utah. Look instead at what portion of your salary you get to keep. One of my co-worker relocated 2 years ago. They were the perfect example, one of the partner works in IT, the other a bike mechanic. The bike mechanic got a wage increase, the IT specialist took a pay cut. But after only a year there, they bought a pretty big house which they would never dreamt of in Brooklyn (NY)
Regarding last sentence, my son's house in the suburbs of SLC is very similar in style and age to mine in the suburbs of Wash DC , although his has about 10% less square footage. Both homes are pretty basic split foyers. The zillow estimate for his house is less than 50% of mine. That translates to a $400k differential.
 

ss20

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Ya know I have a marketing degree I should be putting more to use....but I also have a culinary background. For hahas I was looking at line cook jobs out in UT and the pay is only marginally less than what I'm getting in CT being at the same gig for 6 years. $15-$16 an hour....that's pretty damn enticing given the cheap cost of living. Work when the rest of the world is resting, ski when the rest of the world is working. But as anyone who's worked that industry knows....it sucks. Luckily I only do it 7/12 months of the year. I've been a part-time ski instructor at my local hill and I've got the certs and the experience I think I'd make decent money out there.

Anyway....the plan is to still teach skiing for a season out there then see what marketing opportunities are available in SLC post ski season. But I can see myself on a path up the ski industry. The marketing, FB, and instructing background makes me ripe to be grown into something valuable to the industry, I think.
 

BenedictGomez

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But after only a year there, they bought a pretty big house which they would never dreamt of in Brooklyn (NY)

Meh, that only worked because they're comparing it to NYC homes, which are among the most expensive on Planet Earth. Same could be said if you used San Francisco or some other crazy high real estate area as your comp, but the reality is, homes are actually very expensive in the Wasatch area on a relative basis for the average American, especially given the incomes are less. Frankly, I think Utah is in a housing bubble right now, which is likely only sustainable if more people from CA keep moving in after cashing out their high-priced CA homes! lol
 

ss20

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Meh, that only worked because they're comparing it to NYC homes, which are among the most expensive on Planet Earth. Same could be said if you used San Francisco or some other crazy high real estate area as your comp, but the reality is, homes are actually very expensive in the Wasatch area on a relative basis for the average American, especially given the incomes are less. Frankly, I think Utah is in a housing bubble right now, which is likely only sustainable if more people from CA keep moving in after cashing out their high-priced CA homes! lol

What I think will be interesting is Utah a flee-to state or a flee-from state in our post-pandemic world? Work-from-home is going to continue and people are going to keep moving to the suburbs and rural areas. Is SLC/Sandy "too big" and people go to the new, less dense communities around SLC/Sandy...or do they go totally off the reservation and go t the other boomtowns south and east of Park City? Or do they just pile into the new developments in the SLC area 20 minutes from the city center?
 

kingslug

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I've been looking at moving to Utah forever. The pay cut is extreme though..something like 70 to 80%..yes..that much. My wife would take a similar cut. Unless we really scored a rare job and we have looked.
 
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