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Spring Wax

xwhaler

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What do folks use? I'm the type of skier who gets his skis sharpened/waxed before the season starts and barring damage does not touch them until the following season.
I should put more effort into maintaining my own equipment or at least get into a seasonal program where I get them done every 5 days or so.

Having said that, what waxes for spring skiing are easiest to apply? Back in HS race team days there were quick dry stick waxes we used to use but I'm sure those last a run or 2 max.

I don't have the desire to invest in too much equipment like an iron or vices for my workbench or anything so looking for easiest/cost effective that will improve the sliding experience on those warm spring days.
 

billski

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I always use an iron on wax because I ski all day. Just thinking about it for this weekend. Since I'll probably see a tad of moist snow at the mountain base,I'm probably just going to go with universal wax (Swix F4 is great too). I have my mom's old iron from about 35 years go. I just use my workbench vise for pouring the wax on and ironing it. I then just stand them up to scrape the wax off of them, etc. For the kind of skiing I do, I really won't see much difference in performance, nor do I care. If it's really cold, cold, I'll put a "glacier wax" (I think that's the casual name used) on. When it gets wet, I use an above freezing wax. I don't bother trying to tweak it any closer, since I"m skiing all day in all sorts of terrain.

BTW, It takes me 10 mins to wax and touch up a set of skis, which is simplest enough for me.
In an emergency (if I forgot), I just use a rub on but they are only good below freezing.
I'm not impressed with spray on.
 
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Smellytele

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I have used a spray on wax on occasion in-between my iron waxes and shop waxes. With the spray on it takes awhile for it to dry. I let it dry over night and it seems to work for the day anyway.
 

dlague

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I use and iron on wax but rub it on then cork it and/or use a nylon brush then a horse hair brush and wipe wax dust in between. I started doing this last year by rubbing the wax on when spring days arrived. Last year I rubbed on a hard wax then used a nylon brush and then a soft cloth. It actually worked well on the spring conditions. I carry the brush and the wax in my boot pack!

I have Swix LF 8 & 10 and Swix CH 8 & 10 - can not say i noticed a whole lot of difference between the two. But I did notice the difference when I did the quick touch ups!
 

drjeff

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Hands down, spring is the most important time IMHO for a good coat of wax on one's skis/board on a regular basis, especially if and when "spring" actually arrives and we get some wet snow conditions.

Plain and simple, our skis/boards as they slide across the snow result in the friction between the base and the snow melting a fine layer of the snow and we actually glide on a fine layer of water. Our bases on a microscopic level (or if a core shot is involved a macroscopic level ;-) ) are porous - wax fills up the pores in the base with a hydrophobic material that helps reduce the suction that the water from the melting snow creates with the ski. The more water repellent a base is, the easier it glides, especially over wet snow surfaces. If a base is wax free from plenty of use (it will almost look "dry" and frosted in appearance as opposed to "slick" and smooth) then you get more water "sticking" to the base and sticking of the ski/board to the snow :eek: Granted in really wet snow, even with a perfectly waxed ski/board you may not be able to "break" the suction between the base and the snow and you'll still feel the ski stick.

In the spring, ideal is a soft warm weather wax, or a wax with a high fluorocarbon content, both of which are more water repellant, both of which though tend to not have the greatest longevity. A good universal wax will last longer, but not be quite as water repellent. Both hands down beat a "dry" base in wet spring snow!

Hot wax > rub on and cork > paste wax > liquid rub on wax >>>>>>>> no wax!!
 

WWF-VT

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I have a rub on wax / applicator for most ski waxing that I do and I carry a can of Swix F4 Paste Wax in the spring
 

Scruffy

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Base structure is important for warm weather also. A smoothly worn base will suction to the snow, while a properly structured base will break the suction. There really is no substitute for hot waxing with an iron, and it's not hard, or time consuming at all. Waxing irons are cheap.


Reading in one of the other threads about some of you skiing on dull edges and only getting a tune once a year make me wonder about your commitment to the sport :) A chef wouldn't have a dull knife in his kitchen. Take the time to learn to tune your own skis, or at least learn how to maintain a good shop tune. Know when to have a base grind, and know when to wax. Your skiing will improve.
 

snoseek

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Base structure is important for warm weather also. A smoothly worn base will suction to the snow, while a properly structured base will break the suction. There really is no substitute for hot waxing with an iron, and it's not hard, or time consuming at all. Waxing irons are cheap.


Reading in one of the other threads about some of you skiing on dull edges and only getting a tune once a year make me wonder about your commitment to the sport :) A chef wouldn't have a dull knife in his kitchen. Take the time to learn to tune your own skis, or at least learn how to maintain a good shop tune. Know when to have a base grind, and know when to wax. Your skiing will improve.


Yep, nice course spring structure is key, I had this done today and it made a big difference
 

legalskier

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Can anyone recommend a good spray on spring wax, or is it all iron type

I keep these in my bag just in case- both are rub on. Very pleased with the results.



 

SIKSKIER

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Drjeff has it right but structuring your base after waxing is even more effective by creating channels for the water to glide through and not allowing "suction".
 

Sven Leonson

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Three quick items.

One, I'm currently using the Tognar universal with Floro and have been very pleased.

Two, I used the Zardoz one very warm spring in VT (4 years ago?) and it was the key to an enjoyable day.

Lastly, my BIL took out a set of 'rock' skis that hadn't seen wax in ages and hit a pile of wet manmade snow - the skis stuck like they hit glue and he flew forward, breaking his collar bone and cancelling his 'out west' trip!

Lesson? WAX THOSE SKIS!
 

Cornhead

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+1 on Zardoz, I almost face planted once, stopped into the shop on the hill and asked if they had anything that would help, they pointed at a jar of Notwax towelettes. I've since purchased the "puck" online, a little hockey puck shaped container with a Scotchbrite pad on top, little bottle of Notwax inside. You can apply it prior to hot waxing for a slow release of the stuff. Isn't it a little early for this thread? I hope so, little snow this week, possible mega storm looming, fingers crossed.

Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2
 

drjeff

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Agree with the liquid dish soap for sure! I *might* of used some of that back in the racing days of my youth on wet snow days ;-) Was great to use at the start to get you going. You could really feel the difference for maybe 30 seconds or so. Although the tell tale sign of the occasional soap bubbles coming off your tails kind of gave it away ;) :lol:
 

jrmagic

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I get mine waxed pretty much every 4-5 days. in the spring Zardox does a nice job in between especially in mashed potato or wetter conditions..The hockey puck container lasts me at least 2 seasons.
 
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