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2023/2024 Season Passes

snoseek

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Western Slope is anything west of the divide.

And they are about to start work on Floyd Hill to the tunnels before Idaho Springs lol.. I-70 v the Canyon roads in Utah which is worse? Still glad to be in Colorado
You're living out there now? I assume you're retired? If so the midweek thing ain't so bad
 

BenedictGomez

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housing is more affordable in Utah comparatively to Colorado.

The median home price in Utah isn't all that much less than the median home price in Colorado, but as you know, real estate is local - so I presume you're comparing more expensive places in Colorado versus less expensive places in Utah.
 

ThatGuy

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The median home price in Utah isn't all that much less than the median home price in Colorado, but as you know, real estate is local - so I presume you're comparing more expensive places in Colorado versus less expensive places in Utah.
Decent apartments in SLC/Ogden with proximity to skiing vs Denver are more affordable. I have no desire to live in the Aurora/Glendale area of Denver, I already have Albany and Troy near me in NY if want to get shot at/robbed. So its really Lakewood/Golden or Boulder vs nicer parts the Valley.
But on a statewide median basis if I were purchasing a home you are correct.
 

snoseek

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Spokane, Carson city or montrose/gj would be my pic if I ever ended up back out there.

I'm officially priced out of golden and slc.
 

Bosco DaSkia

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Work full time remote and wife works in medicine, we could live anywhere and the kids are not getting any younger. Made a list of criteria, only NH and Alaska check all the boxes. Checked out Hood River few weeks back with the idea of living over the bridge, cool town but too dry and far from skiing. Turns out there is no utopia.

-decent local skiing with long season
-sufficient rainfall to avoid regular wildfire and drought
-no state income tax
-decent seafood
-no helmet law
-reasonable 2A protections
-local airport with international flights
-cool local town with breweries and restaurants


Juneau has what you are looking for…


fact.
 

Smellytele

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Right where I want to be
My son was right on side Denver in wheat ridge and hated it. Said crime rate was too high. He is a country mouse and hates cities as I do. He is moving back to NH.
 

2planks2coasts

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Aug 1, 2017
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Work full time remote and wife works in medicine, we could live anywhere and the kids are not getting any younger. Made a list of criteria, only NH and Alaska check all the boxes. Checked out Hood River few weeks back with the idea of living over the bridge, cool town but too dry and far from skiing. Turns out there is no utopia.

-decent local skiing with long season
-sufficient rainfall to avoid regular wildfire and drought
-no state income tax
-decent seafood
-no helmet law
-reasonable 2A protections
-local airport with international flights
-cool local town with breweries and restaurants
Ok, how far from skiing is too far? White Salmon, WA is 40 minutes from the HRM lot at Meadows. An extra 15 gets you to Skibowl or T-line.
 

jimk

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Wash DC area
SLC: I could never do the bad food, bad politics, uber white culture on a permanent basis
Yeah I feel the exact same way about all of the above. Since I don’t plan on it being a permanent move I’m leaning SLC just because of the proximity to world class skiing and National Park access (Tetons/Yellowstone, Canyonlands, Grand Canyon, ect). Also as a white man from a rural area I already am used to that kind of political/social atmosphere. Plus housing is more affordable in Utah comparatively to Colorado. I love Denver as a city/Colorado as a state and have been many times but i70 would be horrendous to deal with every week. If I were to move there I’d probably just go to Loveland most of the time to avoid the tunnel.
Planning on October/November so I have a few months to decide where. Have to weigh the pros/cons of it all.
My wife is a great cook, so I can eat very well at home. However, SLC has good Mexican food and good BBQ places. It also has all types of fast food and casual dining franchises. I'm not the type to ever visit a Michelin 3 Star restaurant, but suspect you're out of luck if looking for them in Utah.
I'm not the type to be very concerned about the politics of people I live near. Usually I never talk about that with neighbors unless I know they are of my persuasion on such things. I've had some interactions with LDS people in Utah and they seem reasonably friendly as neighbors and quite trustworthy as contractors/retailers.
We're moving to Utah in less than a month.
Sounds like you're going to be a Park City/Epic pass person. I've skied there frequently in the past, but now I'm Snowbird/Ikon and unfortunately not likely to get a chance to make some tracks near term. But fire away if you have general questions about living in Utah. I live there four of five months each winter for last five years.
 

BenedictGomez

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SLC: I could never do the bad food, bad politics, uber white culture on a permanent basis

My wife is a great cook, so I can eat very well at home. However, SLC has good Mexican food and good BBQ places. It also has all types of fast food and casual dining franchises. I'm not the type to ever visit a Michelin 3 Star restaurant, but suspect you're out of luck if looking for them in Utah.

As someone who used to eat in many of the "best" restaurants in Manhattan & drank the accompanying de rigueur expensive bottles of wine (all for free to boot), you can have it. I find much of that world is silly contrivance made to make people feel "special" or that they have the best. It can be quite arrogant too IMHO. That's not to say that they weren't truly exceptional restaurants, they usually were, but I can be just as happy at a good steakhouse with $24 - $34 steaks done exceptionally well, and where you can wear jeans & a tee-shirt. As for food in Utah, even with my snooty NYC comps, I've never been disappointed frankly, granted, I have much more experience on the Back than the Front, but there are decent resto choices, farm to table, local ingredients, etc... in the mountains at least. Maybe I'm just easy to please. I'm most worried about finding a good pizza spot frankly, but that's to be expected for someone from North Jersey.


Sounds like you're going to be a Park City/Epic pass person. I've skied there frequently in the past, but now I'm Snowbird/Ikon and unfortunately not likely to get a chance to make some tracks near term. But fire away if you have general questions about living in Utah. I live there four of five months each winter for last five years.
Correct. I can be at the hill so quickly that buying anywhere else just seemed kind of silly. Deer Valley was an option, but it's just so expensive for 1 mountain, and if the reports of crowding are true it's probably not the same as it was the last time I skied there, which was about 4 seasons ago. I actually really like Sundance too, and the fact most people have never skied there is a plus (i.e. the opposite of crowding), but I thought a pass there might be kind of limiting. Better than anything in the east of course, but still.....
 

snoseek

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Slc has some great mexicanish food.

If you're into fine dining then there's plenty of places up at park city. If that's not enough then you should probably avoid the west in general. The best most satisfying food is made at home imo. Buy a sous vide set up and some quality meat and add an unnatural amount of butter to everything and boom you're a chef. Don't forget the salt.
 

2planks2coasts

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SLC actually has a decent culinary scene. It's not NYC or SFO, but there's plenty to eat and drink. I recently broke my "no seafood in a land locked state" rule and had the Black Cod at Franklin Ave. Perfectly done and about $20 cheaper than the similar dish I had last night here in Miami. Mushroom Beignets as an app were quite good too. The silly booze restrictions are slowly being revised too.

Denver is actually the last place I would live to do a lot of skiing. Sure, you can see the mountains from there, but getting to them is another story altogether.
 

snoseek

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Messages
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NH
SLC actually has a decent culinary scene. It's not NYC or SFO, but there's plenty to eat and drink. I recently broke my "no seafood in a land locked state" rule and had the Black Cod at Franklin Ave. Perfectly done and about $20 cheaper than the similar dish I had last night here in Miami. Mushroom Beignets as an app were quite good too. The silly booze restrictions are slowly being revised too.

Denver is actually the last place I would live to do a lot of skiing. Sure, you can see the mountains from there, but getting to them is another story altogether.
Pretty much anywhere with people has good food. Nh isn't really known as a foodie paradise yet I can think of a dozen chef driven restaurants here that would satisfy that crowd.
 

Edd

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Newmarket, NH
Pretty much anywhere with people has good food. Nh isn't really known as a foodie paradise yet I can think of a dozen chef driven restaurants here that would satisfy that crowd.
I hope you, of all people, are watching The Bear. I'd be curious to hear your take.
 

2planks2coasts

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Pretty much anywhere with people has good food. Nh isn't really known as a foodie paradise yet I can think of a dozen chef driven restaurants here that would satisfy that crowd.
Where you talking about? My NH neighborhood places all reliably do the classics (stuffed haddock, shrimp pasta, etc, etc) but none are what I would call chef driven, barely chef attended. And don't get me started on the (lack of) wine lists. It's the same three reds and whites by the glass everywhere. Hope you like Meiomi....
 

machski

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denver sounds like the best place to live in terms of being in a real city. but i70 is a nightmare

never been to bend but have only heard great things about it. just think its too small for me.

SLC i could never do the bad food, bad politics, uber white culture on a permanent basis
Kusty, Bend is a blast, great dual activity base in the spring (ski morning at Bachelor, Mountain Bike out of Bend in the afternoon). That said, the amount the hill shuts down, especially the good terrain during storm cycles midwinter, not sure you'd like that. Summit barely opens at times.
 

snoseek

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Where you talking about? My NH neighborhood places all reliably do the classics (stuffed haddock, shrimp pasta, etc, etc) but none are what I would call chef driven, barely chef attended. And don't get me started on the (lack of) wine lists. It's the same three reds and whites by the glass everywhere. Hope you like Meiomi....
Take a little town like Exeter. There's like 4 solid places there right now. Vino e vevo is definitely chef driven. Look around to the popular areas anywhere.
 
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